Skip to main content

Full text of "The Bengal obituary, or, A record to perpetuate the memory of departed worth : being a compilation of tablets and monumental inscriptions from various parts of the Bengal and Agra Presidencies : to which is added biographical sketches and memoirs of such as have pre-eminently distinguished themselves in the history of British India, since the formation of the European settlement to the present time"

See other formats





























Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2016 


https://archive.org/details/b28035264 


THE 


BENGAL OBITUARY; 

OR, 

A RECORD TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY 


DEPARTED WORTH: 

BEING 

A COMPILATION OF TABLETS AND MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS FROM VARIOUS 
PARTS OF THE BENGAL AND AGRA PRESIDENCIES. 

TO WHICH TS ADDED 

3Bingra|il]tnil itetitw nttii I&mtrirs 


SUCH AS HAVE PRE-EMINENTLY DISTINGUISHED THEMSELVES 


IN THE 

HISTORY OF BRITISH INDIA, 


SINCE THE 

FORMATION OF THE EUROPEAN SETTLEMENT TO THE PRESENT TIME. 


HOLMES AND CO. 

c 


39, COSSITOILA K, CALCUTTA. 


W. THACKER & CO., 

No. 8 7, NEWGATE STREET, LONDON; 

AND 

ST. ANDREW’S LIBRARY, CALCUTTA. 


1851. 


r.OYAL COLLEGE OF PMY3ICSAN8 
LIBRARY 

r CL AGS 

■ ! 

r ACCN. 

/■ . 

5V/V- ! 

j SOU I ICE 


| DATE 

J 


/ 


TO 


THE PUBLIC, 

THIS ATTEMPT 

TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY 

OF 

DEPARTED WORTH, 

IS, 

WITH THE GREATEST DEFERENCE, 
DEDICATED, 

BY 

THEIR MOST OBEDIENT AND HUMBLE SERVANTS, 


HOLMES AND CO. 




PREFACE. 


In presenting this work to the Public, the Compilers feel themselves called upon to 
explain the feelings by which they have been actuated, and the motives in which it 
originated. Such an explanation is however in a great measure superseded by the 
deep interest and melancholy pleasure the work is calculated to excite, in the bosom of 
every relative or friend (in this country as well as in Europe) — on finding that the 
names of those whom they loved, regarded, esteemed or admired, are not altogether 
forgotten. Feeble though the attempt may be, something, however, has been done 
to perpetuate the memory of those who claim our affection or veneration : and also to 
evince respect for those whose remains lie entombed in this quarter of the Globe. Nor 
will it be deemed a work of supererogation to convey, by the medium of this work, to 
sorrowing connections in Europe, or elsewhere, the pure and consolatory satisfaction, 
that the last mark of respect and duty to departed worth, has not been omitted by 
their sorrowing friends and that the sacred deposits still remain with us, — are still 
kept in view, and as piously cared for, as on the day of their first interment. 

With such views, and with the desire to preserve from unmerited oblivion the 
hitherto neglected Biographies of India, — the Compilers have connected with the 
Obituary, Memoirs of the most distinguished men in the annals of Indian History ; 
— men, who have, at the sacrifice of their lives, gradually raised the British Indian 
Empire to its present state of stability and eminence, by consolidating its Government, 
ameliorating the condition of its subjects, and embracing their temporal and spiritual 
happiness through the education of its people, and the protection of their rights and 
liberties from the encroachments of invading and cruel enemies. 

These great and good men have glided away from the stage on which they have 
shone so conspicuously : and it is the object of the Compilers, by this humble attempt 
to perpetuate, cherish, and embalm their memory, which becomes doubly dear from the 
consideration that they have fought, bled, and devoted their entire lives and energies to 
promoting the glory of their country and the good of the people over whom Providence 
has willed that they should rule. 

The objects attained by this publication are calculated to be two-fold : while it is, on 
the one hand, a memorial of such as have passed away from time to eternity, it will 
serve, on the other, and in a great measure, to influence the conduct of succeeding rulers, 
(in whose hands may be placed the future destinies of this vast empire,) excitino- in 
them an honest spirit of emulation and a desire to imitate the virtues of their illustrious 
predecessors and thus secure for them a niche in our affection, and a claim to the like 
tribute to their own memory : nor is it for those alone who hold the reins of adminis- 
tration that the lesson conveyed by these reminiscences will obtain a due effect : since to 
every class and grade of society, the manifestation that there is no station of life wherein 
the good and honest men may not have their names and deeds imperishably recorded 
will become at once apparent. Who will deny that the sight of a mere Monument has 
not repeatedly inspired martial enthusiasm, the flame of patriotism or the emulation of 


vi 


PREFACE. 


genius in the youthful breast. “ Siste viator, heroe/n calcas ,” has awakened ardour in 
the minds of all who have perused the tablet. How much more then is not a memoir 
of the great actions of illutrious men, in every department of usefulness, calculated to 
arouse attention and induce the like endeavour. 

It is utterly impossible' to trace back the period when Monuments and Monumental 
Inscriptions were first adopted to commemorate the acts and actions of illustrious men. 
It is certain, however, that for all the ends and purposes enumerated, Monuments existed 
both in ancient as well as modern times. To us it appears, and we have the testi- 
mony ot Holy Writ on this head, that their first origin may be traced as far back as 
the Universal Deluge, when the Rainbow was made, or selected, a standing token of the 
most awful judgment inflicted on a guilty world for its consummate wickedness, as well 
as a memorial of the subsequent love and pity displayed by the offended Deity after his 
divine justice has been satisfied. 

Although it is not in the power of all to command splendid Monuments, or rich 
Inscriptions, over the remains of their departed friends and relatives, yet they may 
be able to take effectual measures for securing those remains from premature decay, 
mutilations, or insult, by proper sepulture ; and it is remarkable, that it is in those 
communities only which are the most deeply impressed with that article of our faith 
the “ Resurrection of the body ” that any real care is evinced in this respect . 

It would be an unpardonable inadvertence were we to omit the mention of our 
grateful thanks to Gentlemen here, and in the Mofussil, by whose generous contri- 
butions our Obituary has been enriched, and who have helped us, with a friendly 
hand, to bring this compilation to a close — the aid they have afforded being a sure 
testimony of the interest they themselves have taken in the work we origiually 
projected. 

The Obituary comprehends events connected with a long series of years ; viz. from 
the first formation of the British settlement to the present time ; and includes a great 
number of Monumental Inscriptions, Memoirs and short Obituary Sketches. To the 
candour of a generous public, the Compilers submit their work, the first of a compre- 
hensive kind hitherto attempted in this country. The motives which prompted a 
publication on this plan cannot be wrong ; but if they have failed to realize their ideas, 
it is only because it is easier to project than to execute — to know what is right, than to 
be able to perform it. Every endeavour has been made to insure success, and no source 
of information has been left unexplored, or expense spared, in obtaining it, so as to 
render the work acceptable to subscribers. The Compilers, therefore, indulge the hope 
of a liberal patronage, which, if it be commensurate to the expenses incurred, will 
encourage them to offer a second volume by w r ay of continuation, the collection of 
materials for the same being under course of arrangement, if the favor shown to the 
first attempt warrants a prosecution of the labour. 








TABLE OF CONTENTS. 


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, MEMOIRS, &c. 


Page 


The Right Hon’ble Gilbert, Lord Minto, 

Governor General of India, 1 

Governor Job Charnock, Founder of Cal- 
cutta, 2 

Mrs. Frances Johnson, the oldest British 

resident of Calcutta, 5 

Sir R. H. Blossett, Knight, Chief justice of 

Bengal, 6 

Rt. Rev. T. F. Middleton, D. D. first Pro- 
testant Bishop and Metropolitan of all 

India, 7 

Henry Lloyd Loring, first Archdeacon of 

Calcutta, . . . . r 11 

Rt. Rev. Reginald Heber, D. D. Lord 

Bishop of Calcutta, 11 

Rt. Rev. J. T. James, D. D. Lord Bishop 

of Calcutta, 15 

Rt. Rev. J. M. Turner, D. D. Lord 

Bishop of Calcutta, 16 

Rt. Rev. Daniel Corrie, L. L. D. formerly 
Archdeacon of Calcutta and late Bishop 

of Madras, 20 

William Twining, Esq. C. R. C. L. S 23 

The Honourable John Adam, Governor 

General of India, 25 

Andrew Stirling, Esq. of the Bengal Civil 

Service, 28 

Brigadier Thomas John Anquetil, late 
Commanding Shah Soojah’s Army, .... 30 

James Pattle, Esq. late of the Bengal Civil 

Seiwice, 31 

Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Kirkpatrick, . . 32 

Rev. J. Z. Kiernander, Founder of the 

Old or Mission Church, 34 

Rev. Henry Martyn, Chaplain on the Ben- 
gal Establishment, 36 

Rev. David Brown, Chaplain on the Bengal 

Establishment, 39 

The Rev. Thos. Thomason, Chaplain on the 

Bengal Establishment, 40 

Rev. R. B. Boyes, Chaplain at the Old 

Church, 42 

Rev. W. Hovenden, B. D. Chaplain and 
Secretary to the Bengal Military Orphan 

Institution 44 

Mrs. Mary Brown, 45 

Mrs. Charlotte Vaughan, ib. 

Particulars of the cruelties of Suraj-ud- 
Dowlah and the Tablet to the Memory 
of the Sufferers in the Black Hole, .... ib. 
Rt. Hon’ble Warren Hastings, L. L. D. 

F. R. S. late Governor General of India, 47 
Lieutenant General Sir Eyre Coote, K. B. 
Commander-in-chief in India, 52 


Page 


Prince Hyder Ally, of Mysore 52 

Vizier Ally, Ex-nabob of Oude, 53 

Sir John Shore (Lord Teignmouth) late 

Governor General of India, 54 

Sir W. H. Macnaghten, Baronet, Envoy at 

the Court of Cabul, 56 

The Most Noble Richard, Marquis of Wel- 
lesley, K. P. K. G. D. C. L. and late 

Governor General of India, 59 

The Rev. William Hunter Ross, Chaplain 

of St. James’s Church, 63 

Miss Mary Bird, ib. 

Rev. N. Forsyth, Minister in the Dutch 

Church at Chinsurah, 66 

Rev. Charles Piffard, late of the London 

Missionary Society, 67 

Rev. J. Keith, late of the London Mission- 
ary Society, ib. 

Rev. R. DeRodt, late of the London Mis- 
sionary Society, 68 

Augustus Cleveland, Esq. late of the Bengal 

Civil Service, 72 

Charles Short, Esq. many years Merchant 

in this city, 73 

Sir William Jones, Knight, one of the 
Judges of the Supreme Court of Judica- 
ture in Bengal, 79 

Charles Weston, Esq 94 

Lieutenant- Colonel Robert Kyd, late Mili- 
tary Secretary to the Government of 

Bengal, 99 

John Adam, Esq. M. D. late Secretary to 

the Medical Board, Bengal, ib. 

Mr. Branch Pilot P. G. Sinclair, 101 

William Fairlie Clark, Esq. Merchant ib. 

J. R. Hutchinson, Esq. late of the Civil 

Service, ib. 

Mr. H. L. V. DeRozio, 103 

Major H. Conran, H. M. Service 152 

Lieut. -Colonel George Ball, late Adjutant 

General of the Bengal Army, 184 

Peter Speke, Esq. late of the H. C. Bengal 

Civil Service, ib. 

T. D. Porcher, Esq. late of the H. C. Ben- 
gal Civil Service, 187 

W. P. Muston, Esq. Surgeon on the Bengal 

Establishment, ib. 

The Honorable F. J. Shore, late Commis- 
sioner of Saugor and the Nurbuddah 

Territories, 196 

Robert McClintock, Esq. Merchant, .... ib. 
W. A. Burke, Esq. M. D. late Inspector 
General of Hospitals of H. M. Forces in 
the East Indies, ib. 


vm 


TABLE OF CONTENTS. 


Page 


Cudbert Thornhill, Esq. late Master At- 
tendant of the Port of Calcutta, 199 

J. R. Vos, Esq. M. D. late Police Surgeon, 204 
N. J. Halhed, Esq. late Judge of the Court of 
Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawlut, ib. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, 212 

The Rev. John Chamberlain, late of the 

Baptist Mission 213 

The Rev. John Lawson, late Minister of 
the Baptist Chapel in Circular Road, .. 215 

The Rev. James Penny, late of the Calcutta 

Benevolent Institution, 218 

Rev. W. H. Pearce, late Pastor of the Co- 

linga Chapel, 221 

Rev. W. Yates, D. D. of the Baptist Mis- 
sionary Society, 222 

Mr. George Bryne of Chinsurah, 228 

Deaths of W. T. Beeby, Esq. and the Rev. 

R. Gibson, ib. 

James Meik, Esq. late Senior Member of 

the Medl. Board in Bengal, 229 

The late William Lennox Cleland, Esq. 

Barrister of the Supreme Court, ib. 

Rev. John Adam, late Missionary of the 

London Missionary Society, 237 

Rev. G. B. Parsons, late Missionary at 

Monghyr, ib. 

The Rev. J. Macdonald, late of the Free 

Church Mission, 239 

Mrs. Mary Hill, wife of the Rev. M. Hill, 

Acting Pastor of the Union Chapel,.. .. 240 

James Kvd, Esq. Ship Builder at Kidder- 

pore, 242 

Captain A. B. Clapperton, late Master At- 
tendant of the Port of Calcutta, 243 


PI. H. Spry, Esq. M.D. F.R.S. and F.G.S. 253 
Rev. Geo. Pickance, late Chaplain of the 
European Female Orphan Asylum,.... 260 
Rev. James Edmond, late Chaplain of the 


European Female Orphan Asylum, .... ib. 

Rev. Deocar Schmid, late Chaplain of the 
European Female Orphan Asylum, .... ib. 

Mr. David Plare, the friend of Native Edu- 
cation, 261 

The Rt. Honorable Charles Lord Metcalfe, 

Govr. Genl. of India, 262 

The late John Palmer, Esq. Merchant,. . . . 266 

Major General Claude Martin, Founder of 

the La Martiniere, 269 

Major General Foster Walker, 276 

Mrs. Mary Fisher, wife of the Rev. Henry 

Fisher, ib. 

The Rev. Plenry Fisher, late Senior Chap- 
lain at the Presidency of Bengal, 277 

The Affghan Massacre, or Tablet to the offi- 
cers and men of the 44th Regiment,. . . . 297 

Monument to the officers and men of the 53d 
Foot, who fell at Subraon and Alliwal, &c. ib. 
Memorial to the Heroes of Affghanistan, . . 298 

Major General Sir Robert Sale, the Hero of 

Jellalabad, ib. 

Major General Sir John McCaskill, K.C.B. ,301 
Lord Keane (Baron Keane, of Guznee in 

Affghanistan,) ib. 

Major General Sir William Nott, G.C.B.. . 302 

The Rev. Dr. Kennedy, late Vicar General 
of Bengal, and Principal of St. John’s 
College, 303 


Page 


The Very Rev. Dr. Rabascall, V.G.B 303 

John Barretto, Esq. Merchant, 304 

Mr. Charles Cornelius, Senior Uncovenant- 
ed Assistant in the late Board of Trade 

office, 306 

Catchick Arakiel, Esq. an Armenian Mer- 
chant of the first rank and eminence in 

Calcutta, 311 

IPadjee Alexios Argyree, the first eminent 
Greek who settled in Calcutta 313 


William Roxburgh, Esq. M.D.F.L.S. and 
S.A. late Superintendent of the Botanical 
Garden of the Hon. Company in Bengal, 317 
Mrs. Ann Thomas, wife of the Rev. J. Tho- 
mas of the Baptist Mission, 318 

Major E. DeArcy Todd, K.L.S. late Politi- 
cal Agent, Herat, 323 

Brigadier Sir A. Macleod, K.C.B. late Com- 
mandant of Artillery, 324 

Major Arthur William Fitzroy Somerset, 
late Military Secretary to Sir Henry Har- 

dinge, Governor General, 329 

Major General Sir Alexander Knox, K.C.B. 331 
The Rev. William Carey, D.D. the father 

of Missions in Bengal, 334 

The Rev. Joshua Marshman, D.D. of Se- 

rampore 340 

The Rev. William Ward, of Serampore, . . 343 

Mrs. Hannah Marshman 345 

The late Mr. Felix Carey, 349 

The late Mr. Boeck, Governor of the settle- 
ment of Serampore, 350 

Mrs. Mundy, wife of the Rev. G. Mundy, of 

Chinsurah, 353 

Mrs. Herklots of Chinsurah, ib. 

Major General Sir J. W. Adams, G.C.B... 356 

Major General Sir J. R. Lumley, late Ad- 
jutant General of the Army, 359 

Lieutenant- Colonel Harry Stark of the Ben- 
gal Horse Artillery, 361 

Major General Sir Jno. Plorseford, K.C.B. 363 

The Rev. J. T. Reichai'dt, 364 

Lieutenant P. B. Bur lton, late of the Bengal 

Artillery, 375 

Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Taylor of the 

Engineers, 378 

Rev. W. Moore, of Bhaugulpore, 385 

Major Chas. Hay Campbell, late of the 

Bengal Artillery, ib. 

J. S. Barwise, Esq. late of Furreedabad, .. 387 

The late Messrs. Gilkison, Logan and Craw- 
ford, Indigo Planters, 388 

Monument to the Memory of the men, wo- 
men and children who were killed by the 

fall of the Barracks at Loodianah, 389 

Lieutenant -Colonel C. J. Doveton, of the 

38th Regiment, 392 

Captain David Ruddell, late of the Bengal 

Army, 395 

Captain G. H. M. Dalby, late Assistant 
Secretary to Government in the Military 

Department, 395 

Colonel T. D. Steuart, late of the 1st Regt. 

of Lt. Cavalry, 396 

Commodore Sir John Hayes, Kt. Senior 
officer of the Indian Navy and Master 
Attendant at Calcutta, ib. 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


IX 


INSCRIPTIONS TAKEN FROM MONUMENTAL TABLETS. 


Page 


St. John’s Presy. Church, 1 

The Old, or Mission Church, 34 

St. Paul’s Cathedral, .... 56 

St. Peter’s Church, Fort 

William 62 

St. Janies’ Church, 63 

St. Thomas’ Church, Free 

School ib. 

St. Stephen’s Church, Kid- 

derpoi'e, 65 

Orphan Burial Ground at 

Kidderpore 66 

The Union Chapel, ib. 

St. Andrew’s Kirk, 68 

The South Park Street Bu- 

l'ial Ground 69 

The North Park Street Bu- 
rial Ground, 177 

The Mission Burial Ground, 208 

The Baptist Chapel, Circu- 
lar Road, 213 

The Benevolent Institution, 
Scotch and Dissenters’ Bu- 
rial Ground, 225 


The Military Burial Ground, 244 
The European Female Orp- 
han Asylum Chapel, .. 260 

Christ’s Church, Sirnlah, 261 


Hindoo College Square, . . ib. 

Hindoo College, ib. 

Hare’s School, ib. 

Medical College, 262 

Native Hospital, ib. 

Cornwallis Statue, Town- 

Hall 265 

Ochterlony Column, .... 268 

Bentinck Statue, ........ 266 

Bust of the late Charles 
Beckett Greenlaw, .... ib. 


Bust of the late Major Genl. 

Sir Wm. Casement, . . 268 

Statue of the Marquis 
of Hastings, Tank Sqr. 268 
Statue of Sir Ed. Hyde 
East, Bart, Sup. Court. 269 


La Martiniere, 269 

The New Burial Ground, .. 271 

Roman Catholic Cathedral, 302 
Roman Catholic Church in 

Boitaconah, 307 

Portuguese Burial Ground, 

at Boitaconah, 309 

Roman Catholic Church in 

Dhurmtollah, 310 

Roman Catholic Church of 

St. Thomas,’ ib. 

Armenian Church, ib. 

The Greek Church,, 313 


Page 


Armenian Philanthropic 

Academy, 313 

The French Burial Ground, 

Park Street, 314 

Bishop’s College Burial 

Ground, 315 

Hon. Co.’s BotanicalGarden, 316 
Garden Reach Dispensary, ib. 
Sulkeah Burial Ground,.. 318 
St. Thomas’ Church, How- 
rah, 319 

Howrah Burial Ground, . . ib. 
Augurparah Orphanage, .. 322 

St. Stephen’s Church, Dum 
Dum, 322 


Dum Dum Column, .... 325 

Dum Dum Burial Grounds, 326 
Barrackpore Cenotaphs, .. 328 

Barrackpore Church, .... 329 

BarrackporeBurial Ground, 330 
Danish Church, Serampore, 346 
Danish Burial Ground Ditto, ib. 


Mission Burial Ground Do. 347 

Pultah Burial Ground, .. 350 

Chandernagoi'e, ........ ib. 

Chinsurah, 353 

Subathoo, 356 

Gya, 358 

Ferozepore, 359 

Chunar, 360 

Cawnpore, 361 

Kussowlee, 363 

Bhaugulpore, .......... 364 

Goruckpore, 365 

Monghyr, 366 

Bandel, 369 

Chirra Poonjie, ib. 

Landour, ib. 

Bundlekund, ib. 

Gazeepore, ib. 

Rajpootannah, 370 

Hyderabad, .. .. ib. 

Hameerpore, ib. 

Hazareebaug, ib. 

Kishnaghur, ib. 

Bongong 371 

Goalparah ib. 

Sirnlah Hills, ib. 

Lucknow, ib. 

Mymensing, 372 

Malda, ib. 

Sultangunge factory, .... ib. 

Tumlook, ib. 

Shajehanpore, . . ib. 

Singapore, ib. 

Goomsoor, 373 

Sonamooky, ib. 

Sylhet, ib. 


Page 


Rungpore, 373 

Patna, 374 

Purneah, ib. 

Nusserabad, ib. 

Nunklow, (Assam.) 375 

Dibrooghur, (Do.) 376 

Upper Assam, 377 

Allyghur, ib. 

Arracan, ib. 

Akyab, 378 

Agra, ib. 

Arrah 379 

Azimghur, ... ib. 

Allahabad, ib. 

Almorah, ib. 

Burdwan, 380 

Beerbhoom, ............ ib. 

Bogwangolah, ib. 

Burresaul, ib. 

Dacca, 381 

Berhampore, ib. 

Banda, 382 

Barreilly, ib. 

Benares, ib. 

Buxar, 383 

Cossimbazar, ib. 

Chuprah, ib. 

Chittagong, ib. 

Cuttack, ib. 

Dinapore, 384 

Deyrah Dhoon, 385 

Etawah, ib. 

Futtyghur, ib. 

Futtehpore, 386 

Furreedpore, ib. 

Jullunder, ib. 

Juanpore, ib. 

Jessore, 387 

Jumaulpore, 388 

Kyouk Phyoo, ib. 

Loodianah, ib. 

Meerut, 390 

Midnapore, 391 

Mullye, 392 

Mooradabad, ib. 

Mirzapore, ib. 

Moulmein, 393 

Mhow, ib. 

Kedgeree, .............. ib. 

Tirhoot, ib. 

Saugor, 394 

Shiraz, 395 

Octacamund, ib. 

Neemuch, 396 

Coco’s Island, ib. 

Darjeeling, 397 

Umballah, ib. 




















THE 


BENGAL OBITUARY. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


The first stone of this handsome edifice* was laid on Tuesday the 6th day of April, 1784, on the 
morning of which Mr. Wheler, then acting President, proceeded from the old Court House attended by 
the chief officers of State and the principal inhabitants of Calcutta, to the ground upon which the sacred 
edifice was to be erected. The first stone was laid by Mr. Wheler with the usual ceremonies ; a Prayer 
was read on the occasion by the Rev. W. Johnson, Senior Chaplain, and a plate of Copper was inserted 
in the Stone, bearing the following Inscription : — 

The first stone of this Sacred Building, 

Raised dy the liberal and voluntary 
Subscription of British Suejects, 
and others, 

was laid under the auspices of 
The Honorable Warren Hastings, Esq. 

Governor General of India, 
on the 6th day of April, 1784 ; 

AND IN THE 13th YEAR OF HIS GOVERNMENT. 


It may be mentioned as an instance of the comparatively high remuneration awarded to European skill 
sixty years ago, that the English engraver charged 232 Rupees for his work. 

Lieut. Agg, of the Engineers, had the entire construction of the building ; it was completed by a 
design furnished by himself. There is some difficulty in ascertaining the exact cost of the church ; 
upwards of a lac and a half of Rupees appear to have been expended upon'it up to April 1787, exclu- 
sive of the remuneration to the Architect, which was Sa. Rs. 22,793, being 15 per cent, on the amount 
expended. Nearly the whole of this sum [with the exception of the grant from the Court of Directors 
of in, 200, and 14,000 Rs. granted by the Government] was raised by voluntary contributions. 

On the 21th of June 1787 the church was consecrated and dedicated to St. John, by a special act of 
consecration sent out by the Primate, the Rev. William Johnson and the Rev. Thomas Blanshard, were 
chaplains. The Governor General, Earl Cornwallis, attended, with all the principal officers of the State, 
and during the Anthem a collection was made for the benefit of the Charity School, amounting to 
Sicca Rupees 3,943-3. 


Sir John Zoffany bestowed on the Church that admirable altarpiece painted by him, representing 
“The Last Supper.” It was proposed by the Rev. W. Johnson, and Cudbert Thornhill, Esq. as Sir 
John Zoffany was about to leave Calcutta, to present him with a Ring of 5,000 Rs. value, in considera- 
tion of this signal exertion of his eminent talents. The low state of their funds prevented other members 
of the Committee from supporting the motion of Messrs. Johnson and Thornhill ; but they unanimously 
agreed in sending Sir John Zoffany an honorable written testimonial of the respect in which they held his 
great abilities, as an artist. From their handsome and appropriate letter the following is a paragraph : 

“ We should do a violence to your delicacy, were we to express, or endeavour to express, in such terms 
as the occasion calls for, our sense of the favour you have conferred on the settlement by presenting to their 
place of worship, so capital a painting that it would adorn the first church in Europe, and should excite in 
the breasts of its spectators those sentiments of virtue and piety so happily pourtrayed in the figures,” 


North Gallery. 

St. John’s Church, 
Founded and consecrated 
under the auspices 
of the Most JMoble 
Marquis Cornwallis, 

A. D. 1787. 


South Gallery. 

St. John’s Church, 
Enlarged and improved 
under the auspices 
of the Right 11 onorable 
Lord hi into, 

A. D. 1811. 


Lord Minto, who was appointed Governor General of India on the 31st of July 1807, died suddenly 
the 21st of June 1814, at Stevenage, about a month after his return to England from India. He was oil 
his way to Scotland and had left London in a bad state of health. In the course of his illness he had no 
presentiment of approaching dissolution, and seemed only anxious to proceed on his journey and reach 
Minto as early as possible. In his domestic circle no man ever displayed a kinder heart or was ever 
more affectionately beloved. 

* The first church erected in Calcutta (also called St. John’s), stood at the western extremity of what is 
now known as Writers’ Buildings ; it was destroyed at the capture of Calcutta by Suraj-ud-Dowla in 1756 
after it had been in use for about 40 years, 

a 



2 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


Lord Minto is the author of a number of beautiful little poems, 11 The Minto Vision,” descriptive ol 
the romantic seat of his ancestors, and is a production of high merit. 

Every man who is proud of contemplating examples of private munificence, will acknowledge with 
pleasure the feeling and generosity of this illustrious person, who was resolved at his own expense to 
erect a Cenotaph at Barrackpore to the memory of those brave officers and men who fell gloriously in 
the conquest of Bourbon, Mauritius and Java. 

It was during Lord Minto’s administration m India, that St. John’s Church was enlarged and im- 
proved at the expense of Government. 

“ Thy name revered through India’s distant clime 
Shall live triumphant o’er the wrecks of time.” 


Governor — JOB CHARNOCK . — (The Founder of Calcutta.') 

Mr. Charnock was the first Englishman who made a conspicuous figure in the political theatre of 
India. He was the founder of the British Settlement of Calcutta ; and may be said to have laid the 
first stone of the mighty fabric of our Indian Empire. 

When peace was established between the great Emperor Aurungzebe and the English Company, Job 
Charnock, the Company’s Chief at Hooghly, twice removed the factory, and in the year 1689-90, 
finally formed an English Settlement at Calcutta, which ere one century terminated, became a mighty 
city — the magazine of trade — the arbitress of kingdoms — and the seat of empire. 

Mr. Orme says, “ Mr. Charnock was a man of courage, without military experience ; but impatient 
to take revenge on a Government, from which he had personally received the most ignominious treat- 
ment, having been imprisoned and scourged by the nabob.” 

The sense of such an indignity was, doubtless, deeply rooted in the mind of Charnock, and, perhaps, 
was one of the reasons for the severe usage of the natives, ascribed to him by Captain Hamilton. 

Before, or about the year 1678-79, Mr. Charnock, smitten with the charms of a young and beautiful 
Hindu, who decked with her most pompous ornaments, and arrayed in her fairest drapery, was at the 
point of sacrificing an innocent life, of (perhaps) fifteen summers on the altar of Paganism, directed his 
guards to seize the half-unwilling victim ; the obedient guards rescued her from an untimely death, and 
Charnock softly conducted her to his house. They lived together many years. She bore to him several 
children, and dying shortly after the foundation of his new city, was entered at the Mausoleum, which 
to this day stands entire, and is the oldest piece of masonry in Calcutta. 

If we are to credit Captain Hamilton (who had the story from existing authorities) his sorrow 7 for the 
loss of this lady was unbounded, and the public method be took of avowing his love, w r as carried to an 
unusual though innqpent excess. So long as he lived, he, on the anniversary day of her death, sacrificed 
a Fowl in her Mausoleum. We now, through the vale of time, cannot trace his reasons for this extra- 
ordinary ceremony. We refer the reader to the Epitaphs for further information respecting Charnock ’s 
family and connections in India. 

From an oral tradition still prevalent among the natives at Barrackpore (now an established Military 
Cantonment, fourteen miles distant from Calcutta)* we learn that Air. Charnock built a bungalow there, 
and a flourishing Bazar arose under his patronage, before the settlement of Calcutta had been determined 
on. Barrackpore is at this day best known to the natives by the old name of Chanocfc, and Captain 
Hamilton, misled by their method of pronunciation, invariably writes the name without the letter r. 

Governor Job Charnock died on the 10th of January, 1692 ; and if the dead knew any of the living, 
and could behold with mortal feelings this sublunary world, with what sensation would the Father of 
Calcutta glow to look down this day upon his city ? 

The following is the Inscription taken from his monument situated on the north of the church. 


D. O. M. 

Jobus Charnock, Armiger 
Anglus et nup. in hoc. 
regno. Bengalensi. dignissim’ Anglorum 
A gens Mortalitatis sure exuvias 
sub hoc m arm ore deposuit, ut 
in spe beatae resurrectionis ad 
Christi judicis adventum obdonnirent. 


Qui postquam in solo non 
suo peregrinatus esset diu, 
reversus est domum suae aeler 
nitatis decimo die 10; h Januarii 1692. 

Pariter Jacet 

Maria, Iobi Primogenita, Carole Eyre Anglorum 
hicci Praetecti. Conjux charissima. 

Quai Obiit 19 die Februarii A. D. 1696-97. 


Before the commencement of the year 1802, the Tombs in the Cemetery of Calcutta had fallen into 
a state of irreparable decay, and to prevent any dangerous accident, which the tottering ruins threat- 
ened to such as approached them, it was deemed necessary to pull down most of them and clear the 
Burial Ground which had long been out of use, only leaving those tombs of which the Inscriptions were 
legible, and the Sepulchre of the Charnock Family. The stones and marble tablets were carefully 
cleared from the rubbish and laid at the base of Job Charnock' s Monument, where they are still to be 
seen in excellent preservation, the Inscriptions are in raised letters, and are as fresh as when first cut. 


Here lies interred the body of 
Captain Henry Burton, 

late Commander of the Ship Loyal Captain, from 
Fort St. George, who departed this life 
on the 25th of December, Anno Domini 1693, 
Aged 42 Years 5 Months and 16 Days. 


Here lies interred the body of 
Elizabeth Mabbe, 
wife of Capt. John Mabbe, Mariner, who 
departed this life 
the 1 9th of May 1699, 
in the 23rd year of her Age. 


* The English Cantonment at Barrackpore was formed in the year 1775, and the first bungalow was 
built there in the month of February, about 150 yards from where the flag-staff now stands. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


3 


Hie Jacet 

Catherina White, 

Donn Jonatlianis White, uxor dilectissima et 
T ov Mmaerov Iobi Charnock 
filia Natu minima : 
que primo iu partu et JEtatis flore 
Annum Agens unum de vigenti, 

Mortem Obijt heu ! immaturam 21 Januarii 1700, 
Siste parumper, Christiane Lector, 

(vel quisquis es tandem) et mecum defle 
Duram sexus muliebris sortem 
qui per elapsa tot anoram millia 
culpam prim’ 2Eva) luit Parentis, 
et luet usque dum eternum stabit 
In dolore paries filios . — Genesis iii. lb. 

In Memoriam 

Jonatlianis White, Angli, 
et in rebus Anglorum administrandis in hoc 
Bengalee Iiegno olim secundi ; 
qui ano su* peregrinationis trigessimo et 
quarto ab hinc in aeternas 
migravit domos vigessimo tertio die 
Januarij Anno Domini 1703. 


In piam memoriam 
Margaritse Adams. 

Rev. Domni Benjimanis Adams, 
ecclesiae Christi in Bengala Pastoris 
Dilectai olim conjug'is. 

Obijt Decimo 3 tio Calendorum 
Septembris Anno Domini 1703. 


Mors janua vitae plorum nitamur exemplis 
doctorumque sennonibus : per augusta enim est via 
qua) ad vitatn dueit et panciqui inveniunt. Matt. 
vii. 14. 


Here lyes interred the body of 

Samuel Jones, 

Son of Captain Samuel Jones of London, 
who dyed Purser of the Ship Dutchess, Juno 19, 
1704. 


Here lyes the bodyes of Francis 
Ailey, Thomas Ailey, and Richard 
Gourlay, Obt. Augst. the 19th, Sept, 
the 5th, and 14th, 1703. Francis, aged 
3 years and 3 months ; Thomas 5 years, 
and Richard 18 months. 


Here lyes interred the body of 
Richard Gary, 

Merchant, who departed this hie 
the 15th November, Anno Domini 1708, 
In the thirty-fifth-year of his age. 


Ralph Sheldon, Armiger et ill ustris sheldoniani 
stematis haud indigna Proles. Morlalitatis suae 
exuvisin spe beatae resurreetionis, sub hoc tumulo 
deposuit Aprilis26, 1709, AEtat 37. 


Gilbert Sheldon, who succeeded Juxon as Archbishop of Canterbury in 1663, was remarkable for his 
devoted attachment to Charles 1st and for the munificent support which he afforded to the advancement 
of learning in the University of Oxford. His elder brother was Ralph Sheldon the representative of the 
family, which is of ancient descent in Staffordshire. 


Here lyeth interr’d the body of 
Capt. Christopher Gradock, 
who departed this life the 30th of July 1714, 
In the 33rd year of his age. 


A plain slab in the Charnock mausoleum bears the following Inscription to the memory of Dr. 
Hamilton, to whose professional talents our nation was so deeply indebted in the beginning of our 
eventful career in India. 


Under this stone lyes interred the body of 
"William Hamilton, Surgeon, 
who departtd this life the 4th Dec. 1717. 
His memory ought to be dear to this 
nation, for the credit he gain’d 
the English in curing Ferruekseer, 
the present king of Indostan, 
of a malignant distemper, by which 
he made his own name famous 
at the Court of that great monarch ; 

and without doubt will perpetuate 
his memory, as well in Great Britain, 
as all other nations in Europe. 


Here lyes the body of 
Mary Wallis, 

Wife of Richard Wallis, 
who departed her life the 3d day 
of Aug. 1718, Aged 31 Years. 


Here lyeth the body of 

Elizabeth, 

late wife of Jonathan Cooper, 
and daughter of Capt. Henry Burton, 
who departed this life the— day 
of March 1719, JEtatis 29. 


William Eivesay, Merchant, 
after he had voyaged m these parts 
many years, an eminent supercargo, 
to the general satisfaction of his employers, 
and public good of trade ; rests here, 
(much lamented by those who knew him) 
e 2 


With his Wife Sarah and three children, viz. 
Hester, John and William, 
who were all born and departed this life 
according to the following - account : 

Hester, Dyed 26 Aug. 1716, aged 2 Years, 5 Mas. 
John, Dyed 29th Aug. 1716, aged 4 Mns. 15 Days. 
Sarah, the Mother, Dyed in child-bed 
May the 20th 1718, Aged 25 Years, 2 Months ; 
William was born the 16th of May 1718, 
and Dyed the 27th of April 1719. 

Mr. William Livesay after sorrowing 
some time for his said family, 
departed this life the 15th of November 1719, 
Aged 40 Years, 1 Month, 6 Days; 
being born on the 9th of October 1679. 

Here lyeth interred the body of 

Margery Jones, 

Daughter of Mr. George Croke, Merchant, 
formerly of Council in this place. 

She was marry ’d in Fort St. George, to 
Captain John Jones, the 23d of October, Anno 1711, 
who afterward being appointed 
Master Attendant for this settlement. 

She died here the 25th April 1723, 

Aged 30 Years, 1 Day. 


Here Lyeth interred the body of 
Peter Markland, 
a Factor in the Hon. Comp.’s Service, 
who departed this life 1725. 

To his memory this Tomb is erected by Capt. 
Richd. Gosfright, commander of the Fordwick, 


t 


4 


ST. JOHN'S CHURCH. 


Here Lyes interr’d the body of 
Captain Isaac D’Varenne, 
who departed this life the 24th October 1730, 
m the 37th Year of his Age. 


Hie jacent Mortales exuvae 
Elizabethan Barrwel, 

sed parcis invitis Deo cui omnia 
vivunt virtutibus et meritis aucta 
vivat ilia Willelmi Barrwel, 
dilectissima conjux ipsum maxime 
cognatus amicos quo otnnes inenoda 
bili dolore affectos Relinquena 
extremum vitas spiritum edidit 
die 25 Septembris 1731, JEtatis suae 22. 


Hie in spe beatitudinis Christi reeumbunt cineres 
Dominae Marthee Orme, 
vidnas Reverendo Roberto Orme, decesso, 
sanctitate in Deum et Benignitate in omnes 
Praeclara fuit 

spiritum agebat supremum IV. die Februarij 
Anno Redemptionis MDCCXXXV. JEtatis suae 
LX VI I. 

Hie etiatn requiescunt cineres 
Dominae Eouisse Teresae Meredith, Filial 
predictae Marthae et Roberti Orme Felicissime 
nupta fuit Iacobo Meredith, hujus loci 
incolae, cui semper in omnibus hujus vital 
actionibus carissima fuit Pietate et sanctitate 
beatae matris praedita fuit, bona sua 
indoles singularisque benignitatis 
cum pura castaque mente juncta 
Gratam Omnibus Reddiderunt 
supremum Obijt XII. diem Septembris 
Anno Christi MDCCXLI. Hiltatis suai XXVII. 


Here lyeth interred the body of 
Mrs. Sarah Bourchier; 

she departed this life on the 12th day 
of February 1738-9, aged 35 Years, 

7 Months and i8 Days. 


Here lyeth interred the bodies of 
Jonathan Smart, Senior, 
who departed this life Sept. 4th, 1745, Aged 48 ; 

Jonathan Smart, Junior, his son, 
who departed this life September 8th, 1747, aged 25. 


Here lyeth interred the body of 
Captain George Goring, 
third son of Sir Harry Goring, Bart, who departed 
this life the 11th November 1750, Aged 40. 


Ilic J acet 

Anna Moore, 

Obiit primo die Decern bris, Anno Domini 
MDCCXL. 

Pulchritudo et omnes virtutes 
in Ilia dilectissime junctae fueruut, 

Beatas llle qui talem tenet 
Uxorem beatissimus erain dum vfxit. 

O Lector meum perpeude damnum ettunc dice 
quem inter homines putas miserimum. 

Beauty doth lay interr’d beneath this stone, 

And every virtue sweetly joined in one. 
Bless’d was the man possess’d of such a wife ; 
Most bless’d was I, while God preserved her life. 
Think what I’ve lost, kind reader, tell me then 
YVho in the World is wretchedest of men. 


Here lyeth the Body of 

Charles Beard, Esq. 

who departed this life the 30th December, Anno 1747, 
Aged 49 Years. He was son of John Beard, Esq. 
formerly president of this Place. 


Virtus post funera Vivit. 

This Monument was erected in Memory of 

Martha Eyles, 

Daughter of Sir John Witteurong, Bart, 
and Relict of John Gum ley, Esq. 
who died Chief of Dacca in January 1742-3, 
After being again Married a short time 
to Edward Eyles, Esq. of Council at Fort William; 
she concluded this life with a 
becoming resignation the 21st August 1748, 
being well esteemed and much regretted 
by those who were acquainted with 
her engaging qualifications and personal merit. 


Here lyeth interred the body of 
Mr. James Boss, of Calcutta, Merchant ; 
who departed this life October 7, 1751, 

In the 45th year of his Age. 

With equal pace impartial fate, 

Knocks at the Palace and the Cottage gate ; 
Nor should our sum of life extend 
Our growing hopes beyond their destined end. 
Inscribed to the Memory of her tender and dear 
husband; by Johannah Ross. 


Here lyeth the body of 
Mrs. Jane Smart, 

Relict of Mr. Jonathan Smart, who departed this life 
the 10th September, Anno 1753, Aged 50 years. 


Here Lye 

the remains of Mrs. Jane Douglas, 

Aged 28 Years, 

who departed this life the 7th November 1755, 
to the lasting affliction 

of all who were happy in the knowledge of her many 
good, sensible and amiable qualities : 

By her lies deposited the body of her daughter 
Helen Douglas, 
who deceased prior to her Mother, 
the 22d June, 1755, Aged 3 Years, 
to whose beloved Memories this Monument is erect- 
ed by their afflicted and affectionate husband 
and father, Mr. Charles Douglas, 

Third son of Sir YVm. Douglas of Kelhead, Bart. 


Here lyes the 

Body of ‘William Speke, 

Aged 18 : Son of Hy. Speke, Esq. 
Captain of His Majesty’s Ship Kent. 
He lost his leg and life in that ship 
At the capture of Fort Orleans, 
the 24th of March, Anno 1757. 

( This Monument is yet standing. J 


Here lies interred the 
Body of Charles W r atson, Esq. 

Vice Admiral of the White, 
Commander-in chief of His Majesty^ 

Naval Forces in the East Indies, 
who departed this life the 16th day of August, 1757, 
In the 44th year of his Age. 

Geriah taken February 13th, 1756. 

Calcutta freed January lltli, 1757. 
Chandernagore taken March 23d, 1757. 
Exegit Monumentum are perennius. — S. O. Fd. 


Amongst the modern Tombs is the one now standing over the remains of Admiral Watson , who 
died in the full tide of success. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


5 


Underneath this Stone lyeth the remains of 

Charlotte Becher, 

the affectionate Wife of Richard Becher, Esq. 

In the East India Comp.’s Service in Bengal. 
She died the 14th day of October in the year 
of our Lord 1759, in the 21st 
year of her age ; after suffering 
with patience a long illness occasioned by grief for 
the death of an only daughter, 
who departed this life at Fultah the 30th day of 
November 1756. 

This Monument is erected to her memory, by her 
afflicted husband. 


Here lieth the body of 

Jane Martin, 

Wife of Lieut. -Col. Fleming Martin, 
who died the 15th day of Sept. 1766, Aged 35 Years. 


Here lies interred the body of 
Mrs. Frances Rumbold, 
wife of Thomas Rumbold, Esq. who departed 
this life in child-bed, August 22d, 1764, Aged 26. 
This Monument is erected in memory of the 
many virtues she possessed and which made 
her truly amiable in the several relations of 
a child, a wife, a parent, and a friend. 


Here lyeth the Body of 
Mrs. Eleanor Win wood, 

late Wife of MajorRalph 
Winwood, who departed this life on 
the 22d day of September 1766, Aged 22 \ ears. 
Requiescat in pace. 

(This Tomb remains stunding.) 


Here lyeth interred 
Mrs. Elizabeth Reed, 

late wife of John Reed, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 16th 
of September, 1767, in the 26th Year 
of her Age ; one who adorned the amiable 
virtues of a dutiful child, a sincere and loving wife, 
a tender affectionate parent, 
a kind relation and true friend ; 
a humane mistress, and a real 
Well-wisher to all her fellow-creatures. 

Here also is interred 
her infant son, who died 
the 17th of November following. 

Aged one Month and 27 Days. 

('This Tomb remains standing.) 


The large cenotaph at the North Angle of the Church was erected to the memory of the officers ivho 
fell in the Rohilla campaign, hut strange to say, hears no Inscription whatever, neither is there any 
reference to the memorial in the records of the church. 


MRS. FRANCES JOHNSON — (The oldest British Resident in Calcutta.) 

Died on the 3rd February, at her late dwelling house, to the Northward of the Old Fort, Calcutta, the 
venerable Mrs. Frances Johnson, in the 87th year of her age, the oldest British resident in Calcutta. This 
lady was the second daughter of Edward Crook, Esq. of Herefordshire, Governor of Fort St. David, on 
the coast of Coromandel, and was born on the 10th of April 172$.' Mr. Crook, previously to his return 
from India, was offered the Government of Fort St. George, but declined the appointment, on account 
of his age and infirm health, and returned to his native country, where he was received with high respect 
by the Court of Directors of the East India Company. 

In 1734L Miss Frances Crook, in the H^th year of her age, married Parry Purple Templer, Esq. 
nephew to Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, by whom she had two children, both of whom 
died young. In about five years after her marriage, she was left a widow by the death of Mr. Templer. 
She married secondly, James Altham, Esq. a Civil Servant on the Bengal Establishment. This second 
union was of short duration ; in twelve days after his marriage, Mr. Altham died of the small-pox. 

Mrs. Altham remained a widow for about two years, when she married William Watts, Esq., then 
senior Member of the Supreme Council, and subsequently appointed Governor of Calcutta ; but at the 
time his appointment reached India, he was on his return to England. In 1756, when Calcutta was 
taken by Suraj-ud-Dowlah, Mr. Watts was chief at Moorshedabad, and both he and Mrs. Watts were 
in that city at the time of the surrender of Fort William. The Nabob, elated by his momentary suc- 
cess, threatened destruction to every British subject, male and female. Mr. Watts and his family were 
placed in custody at Moorshedabad, to await the arrival of the Nabob ; but they were both favoui'ites 
of the Begum, the mother of the Nabob, and to her friendship they were both indebted for their pre- 
servation. On this occasion, Mrs. Watts was placed under the same roof with the ladies of the Nabob’s 
Court, by whom she was treated with the utmost delicacy, kindness and respect. At the expiration of 
thirty-seven days, and while the Nabob still continued in the vicinity of Calcutta, the Begum found a 
safe conveyance for Mrs. Watts, and sent her, under an escort, by water, to Chandernagor, where she 
was received with all possible hospitality and attention by M. Lauss, the French Governor. 

Her husband being still closely confined at Moorshedabad, Mrs. Watts addressed a memorial to her 
friend the Begum, entreating her kind offices for the release of her husband. The Begum possessed 
great ascendancy over her son, the Nabob, and at her intercession, he consented, though with great 
reluctance, to the release of Mr. Watts, who was thus safely restored to his family. 

Mrs. Watts had four children by her third husband, one of whom died in early infancy ; with the 
other three, namely, a boy and two girls, Mr. and Mrs. Watts, about the year 1760, returned to Eng- 
land, where the eldest girl, Amelia, a lady of great beauty and accomplishments, married the Right 
Honorable Charles Jenkinson, afterwards Earl of Liverpool. The second daughter married George 
Poyntz Ricketts, Esq. formerly Governor of Barbadoes. 

Mr. Watts died in England ; and the state of his affairs in India, requiring the presence of his widow, 
Mrs. Watts returned to Bengal about the year 1769 ; and on the 1st of June, 1774, she gave her hand 
to the Reverend William Johnson, principal chaplain to the Presidency of Fort William, who returned to 
England in a few years after his marriage, and Mrs. Johnson continued ever since to reside in Calcutta, 
in a style of dignified hospitality. Her manners were cheerful, polished, and highly pleasing. She 
abounded in anecdote ; and possessing ease and affability of communication, her conversation was al- 
ways interesting, without any tendency to fatigue the hearer. She had a strong understanding, to which 
she superadded much and accurate observation. Her views of life were correct, and the benevolence of 
her heart and the warmth of her affections continued unimpaired to the latest period of her life. Though 


6 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


prone to reflect and to discriminate, yet her judgment did not abridge, but served to guide and exalt her 
benevolence. As a Christian, she was sound in her principles, and exemplified in her practice ; — in fine, 
her conduct in all the relations of life was such as to gain the universal respect and esteem of society. 
She continued to enjoy excellent health till a few weeks before her dissolution. 

Her remains were interred on Tuesday morning in the ground belonging to St. John’s Church, 
where a spot of ground for a Cemetery had been allotted for the deceased during the Government ot 
Lord Wellesley, northward of the Monument erected over the grave of Admiral Watson, N. W. angle 
of the Church yard. 

The funeral was attended by a numerous company, among whom were The Right Honourable the 
Governor General, in the state coach with six horses, and a detachment of the body guard ; The Hon- 
ourable Sir Henry Russell, the Honourable John Lumsden, Esq., ike. &c. 

The Monument over her (/rave atilt remains standing , and bears the following Inscription ; — 

Beneath 

are deposited the remains of 
Mrs. Frances Johnson; 
she was the second daughter of Edward Crook, Esq. 

Governor of Fort St. David, on the coast of Coromandel, 

! and was born the 10th of April, 1725. 

In 1738 she intermarried with Parry Purple Templer, Esq., 

Nephew of Mr. Braddyll, then Governor of Calcutta, 
by whom she had two children, who died Infants. 

Her second husband was James Altham, of Calcutta, Esq. 
who died of the small-pox a few days after the marriage. 

She next intermarried with William Watts, Esq. 
then Senior Member of the Supreme Council of Bengal, 
by whom she had issue four children, 

Amelia, who married The Right Honourable 
Charles Jenkinson afterwards Earl of Liverpool, 
by whom she had issue one child, Robert Banks, now 
Earl of Liverpool, &c. &c. 

Edward, now of Hanslope Park, in the county of Bucks, Esq. 

Sophia, late the wife, and now the Widow of 
George Poyntz Ricketts, Esq. late Governor of Barbadoes, 
and William, who died an Infant. 

After the death of Mr. Watts, she in 1774, intermarried with the 
Reverend William Johnson, then principal chaplain of the Presidency of Fort William, 

by whom she had no issue. 

She died the 3d of February 1812 Aged 87, 

The oldest British resident in Bengal, universally beloved, respected and revered. 

Immediately ivest of the Church are four plain monuments covering the remains of three Judges of 
the Supreme Court, and Bishop Turner. 


SIR ROBERT HENRY BLOSSET, Kt. — ( Late Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.) 

The death of this distinguished character took place about 9 o’clock on the evening of Saturday, the 
1st of February, 1823. He was interred the following evening in the ground belonging to St. John’s 
church on the western side of the compound. 

Of Sir Henry Blosset’s professional character we know but little ; but it cannot fail to be highly 
estimated, when we state, that short as the allotted time was since he first landed in India, (scarcely 
two months,) he had, in that brief period, impressed all the professional gentlemen of the Court with 
the most favourable opinion of his abilities as a lawyer, and his highly eminent character as a firm and 
impartial judge. In his private relations we know still less of Sir Henry Blosset ; but we have learnt 
from a private source, an account of his sublime and impressive death, which, of itself, is a sufficient 
pledge that his life was upright, just and honourable. A few hours only before his dissolution, having 
necessarily become acquainted with the dangerous nature of his case, he sent for his Medical attendants, 
intimating his wish to speak a few words to them in private. One of the Physicians in attendance, soon 
after this, approached his bed-side. Sir Henry, who then lay with his eyes clossed, took this gentle- 
man’s hand, and telling him he was aware of his danger desired earnestly to know to how many hours 
his earthly duration might probably extend. His Physician answered, that painful as such a communi- 
cation must necessarily be, if he earnestly desired to know, he should but ill-discharge his duty if he 
withheld from him the true state of his case. 

He was then informed, that the circulation having ceased at the extremities, and his pulse being no 
longer sensible, many hours could not roll by before his dissolution came. He received this communi- 
cation with that composure which spoke his perfect preparation for the awful event ; and after returning 
his thanks in the most impressive manner, to his medical attendants and friends, for the care and atten- 
tion they had shown during his illness, he poured out his soul in fervent prayer, expressing the content 
and resignation with such he should render up his spirit to God who gave it, and imploring the blessing 
of Heaven on the Hindoo world ; trusting that the Almighty, in his own good time, would bring them 
to the knowledge of the true religion, and call them from darkness to light. After this last effort of 
piety, benignity and love, which proved his end to be in charity with all mankind, he died in peace, 
leaving an example of manly fortitude and holy resignation, as sublime in its nature as it must be 
consoling and beneficial in its influence. 

Sir R. H. Blosset descended from eminently pious parents, and his mother, who long survived her 
partner, imparted with the most unwearied diligence, the principles of genuine piety to all her children ; 
to her endeavours, success was granted through the divine blessing, in every instance. With regard to 
Sir Henry, it must be confessed, that the ensnaring influence of the world, at his first entrance into 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


7 


public life, did, for a little seas.on, draw away his heart from God ; but the principles which a mother 
gave him were never wholly eradicated from his breast ; and when, through the preaching ot a faith! ul 
minister of the established Church in London, he was awakened from sin, they soon flourished with 
increased vigor. Being ashamed, yea, even, confounded, because he did bear the reproach of his youth, 
he fled with repentance and faith to the Saviour’s cross, from whence he never afterwards wandered. 

The University to which he belonged, is Oxford ; having finished the usual course of education there, 
he chose for his profession the noble study of the law r . With what pleasure do we add his name to that 
long list of distinguished lawyers, who have rendered splendid talents still more illustrious by extraordi- 
nary piety. 

Much need not be said in proof of his possessing great talents ; for the circumstance of his being 
appointed Chief Justice of this Province, shows how highly they were estimated by those in authority, 
and by all w r ho became acquainted with him. As a natural consequence of such talents, improved by 
unwearied industry, and adorned by the most winning sweetness of manners, he rose gradually to the 
highest honours of his profession. It pleased God to crown his labours with abundant increase of riches, 
still further enlarged by the fortune of a relation which was bequeathed to him ; he however set not his 
heart upon these things ; his bounty was ever as profuse, as his means w r ere large ; his thoughts were 
not for himself, but for others ; and remembering who was the giver of all, he rendered unto Him again, 
in acts of mercy and charity, a large portion of that which he had received. It is not surprising that to 
such a person every thing connected with the endeavour to spread the Redeemer’s Gospel should be an 
object of interest, and that all such exertions should be encouraged by him to the utmost, and Societies, 
having that object, supported largely by his bounty. This they were indeed. Among the varied regions 
of the earth to which his attention was directed, as spots where Missionary exertions were making, none 
seemed so intensely interesting to him as India. He loved, he pitied, he prayed for the people of India. 
When therefore his appointment was offered to him, and an opening seemed to be made for his doing 
some good in that very land, so long the object of his attention and prayers, he did not hesitate to resign 
a very lucrative practice, and to quit forever, (as he himself presaged) his native country. Thus giving 
up for the benefit of others, that which he had acquired in England, he came hither for the purpose of 
doing good, by every means in his power ; and especially by using that influence, which his rank and 
fortune would give him to promote the spiritual, as well as the temporal welfare of the Hindoos. 

The interval of a sea voyage, to most persons tedious, and to some intolerable, was to him a refreshing 
season of enjoyment. Being now relieved from the cares and ceaseless hurry of business, he set himself 
to study more diligently than ever the Sacred Scriptures. This he managed to connect also with the 
study of Eastern languages, in which he made so good a progress, that, (although labouring without a 
preceptor’s aid, and at the moment of his leaving England quite ignorant of them) before he landed in 
India, he was well versed in Hindoostanee ; possessed a competent knowledge of Persian, and was 
making considerable advances in Sanscrit. In Hindoostanee, indeed, he became the preceptor of others, 
who will long remember his condescension and patience in teaching them. With respect to European 
languages his knowledge was prodigious. He was perfect master of French, Italian, German, Latin, 
Greek, and had some knowledge of Spanish. With the sacred tongue (Hebrew) he was familiarly 
acquainted, and often spoke of it with delight. To all these attainments were added a profound, solid, 
knowledge of the Law, which alone is the labour of a life to many. Such is the man whom it pleased 
God to preserve safe through the dangers of the mighty deep, to bring him to the land where his 
presence was most anxiously desired, and where he himself longed to be ; to give him just a sight of 
those things in which his heart rejoiced, and then, on a sudden, to call him into his own presence. 

The loss in this benighted land is irreparable. Where shall the man possessed of so many qualifica- 
tions be found to supply his place ? These and a thousand other thoughts and questions are apt to 
spring up in our hearts ; but let us be still — and know that it is God who has done it, and that He 
doeth ail things for the best. 


77m following Inscriptions are 

Sir Robert Henry Blosset, 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 

Bengal ; 

Died 1st February 1823 iEtat 47 


taken from the monuments, vis. 

Sir Benjamin Heath Malkin, Knight, 
one of the J udges of the Supreme Court 
of Judicature, 

Died 21st of October 1837, JEtat 40. 


Sir Christopher Fuller, 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 
Bengal * 

Died 26th May 1824, iEtat 50. 


The Right Revd. 

John Mathias Turner, D.D. 

Lord Bishop of Calcutta, 
Died 7th July 1831, aged 45. 


THOMAS FANSHAW MIDDLETON — (first Protestant Bishop and Metropolitan of all India.) 

Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, was the only son of the Rev. Thomas Middleton, Rector of Kedleston 
in Derbyshire, and was born at that village on the 26th of January, 1769. His mother Elizabath, was 
the daughter of John Bott, Esq. of Burton upon Trent. The first rudiments of knowledge were incul- 
cated by his father, a man of learning and respectability. On the 21st April 1779, the subject of our 
memoir was admitted into Christ Hospital, where he was distinguished for serious reflection and steadi- 
ness of conduct. The advantages of education there liberally bestowed were acknowledged with grati- 
tude by Mr. Middleton in his progress through life. Even when engaged in the arduous duties of his 
Bishopric in India, he remembered with feelings of filial regard the place where he had received so much 
benefit. Being desirous to express the sincerity of his thankfulness more strongly than by words, he, in 
the year 1821, transmitted to Christ’s Hospital, a donation of four hundred Founds, and shortly after 
he was elected a Governor of that excellent Institution. 

From school, lie was admitted into Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where his habits were studious and 
his companions literary. He took the degree of B. A. in January 1792, being in the scale of honors 


8 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


fourth of the senior Optimi ; and in March following, having been ordained Deacon by the Bishop of 
Lincoln, he entered on the duties of the Church, as Curate of the Parish of Gainsborough in Lincoln- 
shire. Here he conducted a small periodical work, called “ The Country Spectator,” which existed 
only eight months. His reputation as a Clergyman and a scholar, introduced him to the notice of Dr. 
John Pretyman, Archdeacon and a Preceptor of Lincoln, and brother of the Bishop, who in the year 
1794, entrusted him with the education of his two sons. 

In 1795 the father of his pupils presented him to the Rectory of Tensor in Northamptonshire. His 
mind was now intent upon domestic happiness, and, in 1 799, he married Elizabath, the eldest daughter ot 
John Maddison, Esq. This lady was his amanuensis in transcribing all his manuscripts for the press. 

In 1802 Mr. Middleton received, from the same patron, a presentation to the consolidated rectory of 
Little Bytham. His fondness for local history, as well as general information, induced him to make 
excursions into the country, in which he was often accompanied by Dr. Sayers, whose taste for antiqua- 
rian research corresponded with his own, and whose character he held in the highest esteem. But 
graver studies occupied his chief attention, and particularly the language of Scripture. He was now 
writing his principal work, “ The doctrine of the Greek Article, applied to the criticism and illustration 
of the New Testament.” 

In 1808 he took the degree of D.D. at Cambridge, and preached the inaugurative sermon before 
that University. 

Early in 1810 he began to act as a Magistrate for the county of Northampton, an office which did not 
accord with the duties of the tutor or the habits of the student ; yet, during the short time he tilled this 
situation, he closely applied his talents to the cases that were brought before him, and administered the 
law with the strictest impartiality. 

In April 1812, he was collated by the Bishop of Lincoln to the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon. A 
man of Archdeacon Middleton’s character could not long remain unnoticed by the higher clergy of the 
Metropolis, and his exertions in the pulpit were often called for in behalf of Charitable Institutions. 
Dignitaries and Prelates now cultivated his society. 

The state of religion in India, hitherto neglected, at length attracted the attention of the Legislature, 
and in an act for the renewal of the Charter of the East India Company, a provision was made which 
enabled the crown to constitute a Bishopric, with such jurisdiction and functions as should, from time 
to time, be defined by His majesty, by letters patent under the great seal of England. The Company was 
charged with salaries to be paid to the Bishop and three Archdeacons ; Calcutta was erected into a Bishop’s 
see ; and Archdeacon Middleton selected to fill the important station. At first he shrunk from the magni- 
tude of the charge, and declined it ; but upon more mature consideration, he thought it unworthy of a 
Christian minister to suffer either the difficulty of the office or dangers of the climate, to deter him from 
the performance of a duty to which Providence seemed to call him. “You will easily imagine,” says 
the author of his memoirs, “ that in accepting this office I have sustained a severe conflict of feelings. 

I had even declined it. But when I came to settle the account with my own heart, I really found that 
I had little to allege in behalf of my decision. I began to suspect that I had yielded to some unmanly 
considerations, when I ought rather to have counted my comfort, and my connections, and my prospects 
at home, as altogether worthless in comparison with the good, of which it might possibly be the design 
of Providence, to make me the instrument. How far even now I have reasoned rightly, God alone knows, 
but I have endeavoured to view the subject impartially, and I trust the Almighty to bless the work in 
which I am to engage.” He was consecrated on the 8th of May 1814, by the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, assisted by the Bishops of Lincoln and Salisbury, in the Chapel of Lambeth Palace. The oppor- 
tunity of extending Christianity in the East, was thus enlarged by the establishment of Episcopacy in 
Calcutta, and the appointment of so zealous a member of the Church and so firm a supporter of the 
Society for promoting Christian knowledge as Bishop Middleton, could not fail of being noticed by 
that Institution. The Committee granted his Lordship a vote of LT000 to promote the objects of the 
Society in India, in such ways as he should deem most consonant to its designs. 

On the 19th of May, 1814, Bishop Middleton was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society ; and having 
taken leave of his friends in the country on the 8th of June, he and Mrs. Middleton, and Archdeacon 
Loring, sailed from Portsmouth on the “Warren Hastings” for Bengal. On the voyage the vessel 
touched at Madeira, and the Bishop preached in that Island ; being probably the first Prelate of the 
English Church who had performed such an office before its inhabitants. 

During his voyage he laid down the following rules for his future conduct. “ Invoke divine aid. Preach 
frequently, and as one having authority. Promote schools, charity, literature, and good taste : nothing 
great can be accomplished without policy. Persevere against discouragement. Keep your temper ; em- 
ploy leisure in study, and always have some work in hand. Be punctual and methodical in business, 
and never procrastinate. Keep up a close connexion with friends at home. Attend to forms ; never be 
in hurry. Preserve self-possession, and do not be talked out of conviction. Rise early, and be an 
economist of time. Maintain dignity without the appearance of pride : manner is something with every 
body, and every thing with some. Be guarded in discourse; attentive, and slow to speak. Never 
acquiese in immoral or pernicious opinions. Beware of concessions and pledges. Be not forward to 
assign reasons to those who have no right to demand them. Be not subservient, nor timid in manner, 
but manly and independent, firm and decided. Think nothing in conduct unimportant and indifferent. 
Be of no party. Be popular, if possible, but at any rate, be respected ; remonstrate against abuses, 
where there is any chance of correcting them. Advise and encourage youth ; rather set than follow 
example ; observe a grave economy in domestic affairs. Practise strict temperance. Remember what 
is expected in England — and lastly, remember the first account.” 

He arrived in Calcutta on the 28th of November of the same year, and was received without any pub- 
lic testimony of respect — but his private reception was such as was due to him as a Bishop. 

On Christmas-day, 1814, he delivered his first sermon in the Cathedral of Calcutta, from Luke, ii. 
10, 11. “ For behold I bring you good tidings of great joy which shall be to all people,” &c. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH 


S 


On the first establishment of Episcopacy in India, it was difficult for the Government of Englaiv 
define the powers of the Bishop. The ground was to be tried ; and as circumstances occurred he fount 
it necessary to seek direction, and authority to meet them, from the Crown, which had placed him m the 
See; consequently, the effect of his exertions could not he commensurate with the advantage he contem- 
plated, for he had not the means of bringing it to a completion. Still he was asiduous in his endeavouis 
to ascertain the state of the mind in his extensive diocese, and lost no opportunity of affording inter- 
views to those who sought a conference. 

In the January following his arrival, the Bishop proceeded to appoint Registrars in the three Arch- 
deaconries, and to forward the instruments of institution to the Archdeacons themselves. Having 
placed the proper officers in the ecclesiastical departments, other business demanded his attention. One 
of the first steps for improvement was, the formation of a School Society at Bombay. Ilis early atten- 
tion was also directed to the education of children in the city of Calcutta. The system pursued in the 
Free School was improved under his direction. He became its Patron, and projected annual examina- 
tions. His Lordship took part in these examinations and distributed the prizes. This had its due effect 
upon the spectators, and shortly after, a native waited upon him with a donation oi 500 Rs. He then 
became the visitor of the Orphan School. 

In December 1815, he held his primary visitation at Calcutta, which was attended by ten of the 
Clergy, the rest being absent at the distance of many hundred miles from that city. And on the 18th of 
the same month, His Lordship, accompanied by his family, quitted Calcutta, to make a similar visitation 
of his Diocese ; an undertaking not to be accomplished under 5000 miles. He was conveyed to 
Madras where he landed on the 26th, and on Sunday after his arrival preached at the New Church dedi- 
cated to St. George, which he consecrated on the 8th January 1816, and on the day following, he held 
a confirmation consisting of 278 persons. From Madras, which he quitted on the 31st January, pass- 
ing through Pondicherry, Cuddalore, and Tranquebar, Tanjore, Arisent, Trichinopoly, Parumbutty, 
Polowcottah, Nazeencherry, Pooramgordie, Quilon, Aleppee, Cochin, and Cannanore, &c. lie arrived 
at Bombay on the 14th of May, and there lie held a visitation and confirmation, passing his time with 
exemplary benefit to the Christian Church. He left that place and proceeded to Goa, Cannanore, and 
Aleppee. He arrived at Columbo on the 21st of October, from whence his Lordship, Mrs. Middleton 
and his attendants, returned to Calcutta, which they reached on the 10tli of December. 

Relieved from the labours of the visitation, he was enabled to apply his mind to the concerns of the 
city, and resumed his share in the duties of the pulpit. 

On the 7tli of August 1818, the Bishop laid the foundation stone of the Church at Dum-Dum. (The 
station of the Artillery) which he afterwards consecrated, and in winch he confirmed several persons, 
chiefly soldiers of the station. 

On the 10th of February 1819, he embarked in the Stanmore to visit his Diocese a second time, 
being attended by Mrs. Middleton and his chaplain, Mr. Hawtayne, and anchored in Madras roads on the 
27th of the same month. He landed on the following morning, when he was received by the Archdea- 
con and Clergy; from hence he embarked, on the 14th April, to return to Calcutta, via Penang, Sunday, 
the 13th June, he joined in divine service at Calcutta, with feelings of peculiar delight. 

In November 1820, the Bishop laid the foundation stone of a New Church in the Metropolis, in 
the centre of a numerous European population, who had no means of attending Divine worship ; near 
this sacred edifice, which is dedicated to St. James, a school was erected for the instruction of Christian 
poor, the expense of which was defrayed by a legacy bequeathed to the Bishop by an officer, aided, and 
by a donation from the Bishop himself. At the same period, in consequence of the invitation of the 
Society that he would suggest such measures as might appear to him best calculated to promote their 
designs, he recommended the establishment of a College in the immediate vicinity of Calcutta, the 
object of which he expressed in the letters which he transmitted to England, and the plan was 
worthy of the projector. It was designed for the education of youth in sacred knowledge, in sound 
learning, in the principal languages used in the East, and in habits of piety and devotion to their call- 
ing, that they might be thereby qualified to preach among the heathen. The favour and patronage cf 
the public in England was eminently shown towards the projected Institution. The plans and esti- 
mates for the building were matured. A plot of ground on the bank of the river, and within three 
miles of Calcutta, containing 20 acres, was granted by Government for its site. To this, Six - C. T. 
Metcalfe, then Resident of Hyderabad, contributed a piece of land adjacent, by which the estate 
was greatly improved. The Societies for the Propagation of the Gospel and Promoting Christian Know- 
ledge, gave each 5,000 Rs. to which the Church Mission Society added a similar donation. The Bishop 
contributed 800 Rs. and 500 volumes out of his Library, and Mrs. Middleton a handsome set of plate 
for the communion table. Thus prepared, on the 15th of December, His Lordship, with much solemnity, 
laid the foundation stone. The whole arrangement of the building was planned by the Bishop ; it occu- 
pies three sides of a quadrangle, and contains every requisite for a College, a Hall, a Chapel, a Library, 
and Press. The centre is 150 feet in length, and the two wings are each 150 feet. It stands in a pro- 
minent situation, on ground adjoining the Company’s Botanic Garden. 

Having thus accomplished, in part,«**hat his mind had dwelt upon with intense interest, in January, 
1821, he embarked to visit Bombay, which he had not reached in the former part of his second visitation, 
he arrived at that presidency in the latter end of February. 

On his return from Bombay, on the 19th April, 1821, he went on shore at Cochin, in order to have 
an interview with the Metropolitan of the Syrians on some important point. From thence to Cape 
Comorin and Ceylon, and back again to Calcutta, where he found presiding during his absence, Messrs. 
Mill and Alt, who had arrived from England on the 13th of February to fill the offices of Principal and 
Professor of the College. 

From the most authentic source of information it appears, that on Monday preceding his death, the 
Bishop received the Clergy at dinner, having recently returned to his own house, which had been long 
under repair ; and (except that he was much agitated in the. early part of the evening, by information of 
c 


10 ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 

some very improper proceeding on the part of one of his Clergy) he was unusually cheerful and 
animated. 

The next day he went down to the College at an early hour in the afternoon ; from which his physi- 
cian, who happened to be in the house in attendance on Mrs. Middleton, endeavoured to dissuade him, 
but in vain. He promised, indeed, that he would not go again at so early an hour. Little did he think 
that he was visiting that favourite spot for the last time. 

On Wednesday, he was occupied during 8 hours in writing to Government on the subject of a suit in 
the Supreme Court, and, at length declared himself quite exhausted, but proposed to Mrs. Middleton 
who, from ill health, had not been out for several days, that she should accompany him in the carriage 
before the sun had gone down. 

They had not proceeded far, when, at a turn in the road, the descending sun, which is always dan- 
gerous, and especially during the damper seasons of the year, shone full upon him. A slight cause 
from without, added to the present agitated state of his nerves, was sufficient to produce serious effects. 
The Bishop immediately declared that he was struck by the sun, and returned home ; but refused to 
receive medical advice, and took what was offered him by Mrs. Middleton. When he retired to rest, 
symptoms of fever and irritability of mind, increased ; on the following night he was with difficulty re- 
strained from rising and pursuing the business that pressed upon his attention. 

On Thursday, the fever had increased so much that he wrote to his physician, Dr. Nicolson, a person 
in whom he had implicit and well grounded confidence. The Bishop, now indeed appeared sensible of 
the extent of his disorder, and said that he thought himself seriously ill, and knew not what would be 
the consequence. He sent a letter to his Chaplain to desire that he would take his place in the pulpit 
at the Cathedral on Sunday. But neither in this, nor in any other communication to his friends, was 
there any intimation of the extreme illness which now oppressed him. They were unconscious of the 
dreadful event which awaited them till two hours before he expired. The Archdeacon, the Senior 
Chaplain, Mr. Trotter, whom the Bishop had distinguished by his friendship, Mrs. Hawtayne, and the 
physician were with him. He lay for some time exhausted by the violence of the disorder, and breath- 
ing violently till just before his departure, when an expressive smile spread itself over his features. So 
tranquil was the last moment, that it was not marked by a single struggle. 

Thus expired Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, at 11 o’clock on the night of Monday the 8th July, 1822, 
in the 54th year of his age, and ninth of his consecration, to the great loss of the Christian Church of 
British India. 

The last offices were performed over the remains of Bishop Middleton on Friday following, the 12 th 
of July, amidst the lamentations of all ranks of society. 

No sooner was the sad event made known in Madras, in Bombay, and in England, than the several 
Societies passed resolutions in honor of his memory, for erecting Monuments in the Cathedral of St. 
Paul, in Madras and Bombay, and in Calcutta. 

Thus beloved abroad and at home departed the subject of this memoir. It only now remains that 
it should be closed with some account of his person and disposition. 

In person, Bishop Middleton was above the ordinary stature of man ; strongly formed ; of a florid 
and commanding countenance ; animated and energetic in his manner. In disposition lie was sanguine 
and zealous ; ambitious of distinguishing himself amongst the wise and good ; warm and generous to his 
friends and placable and benevolent towards all men ; unbending in his principles, but charitable to 
those who differed from him in opinion. 

As a husband, he was affectionate and exemplary. As a prelate, he was apostolic in his views, vigilant 
in his government, and anxious for the diffusion of the gospel even unto death. 

It is much to be lamented that in his last will, dated 19th January 1821, he ordered all his manu- 
scripts to be destroyed ; amongst these were his admirable lectures on the Litany, which were ready for 
the press. Bishop Middleton died without issue, and without any near relations. 

The Bishop, in his will, directed that his remains should be interred in the vault under the College 
Chapel, if it were consecrated ; and left an Inscription to be engraved on a tablet in the chapel ; but that 
edifice not being completed at the time when he died, the following variation of the Inscription, left 
also by himself, in case he should be interred elsewhere, is to supply its place. 

In hoc. sacello. 

Nomen meum servandum, Volui, 

Thomas Fanshaw Middleton, S. T. P. 

Primus Dioeceseos Calcuttensis Episcopus. 

Huinsae Collegii vEdificandi suasor. 

Et. pro. viribus adjutor. 

Jesu Christe. 

Lux mundi peccatorum salus. 

Proeconibus tuis hinc exeuntibus. 

Qpitima quaeque dona elargiaris 
Et miserescas annum meae. 

Obiit Anno Redemptoris MDCCCXXII. ,/Eta*i*LIV. Episcopatus IX. 
voluit Elizabetha uxor conjinactissima. Eodem marmore insigniri. 

If the Chapel had been consecrated, and the Bishop’s remains interred in it the Inscription was to 
have run thus : — 

Prope. hunc. lacum. 

Mortales IX. uvias reponendas volui, 

& c. &c. &c. 

His remains were placed in a leaden coffin, and interred in the chancel of St. John’s Church, and 
the following lines engraved on a Black marble tablet, marks the grave. 

T. F. M., D. D. 

Obiit VIII. Julii, 1822. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


11 


HENRY LLOYD LORING — ( First Archdeacon of Calcutta.) 

Ere the Christian church of this city, which had only two months previously to mourn the loss of its 
much respected prelate, could recover from the deep regret occasioned by that melancholy event, the 
announcement of the Archdeacon’s death, on the 4th of September following, instructed the inhabitants 
that another pastoral leader of distinguished piety and zeal, had been removed from his administration. 
So well understood were the virtues of Archdeacon Loring, that we cannot do better than give, (in the 
absence of all other particulars ofhis birth, parentage, &c.,) our readers the copy of a publication of 
the day, recording the lamentable circumstance of his demise : — “ We yesterday had the painful task 
of announcing the death of the Archdeacon of Calcutta ; but we cannot suffer the tomb to close over his 
remains without attempting to pay some further tribute of respect and regret, which we are enabled to 
do through the means of one, who knew him better than we did. Indeed, to do justice to his character, 
a more intimate acquaintance was necessary than the mere occasional intercourse of society admitted ; 
for although that alone was sufficient to excite feelings of the most cordial esteem, his plain and unobtru- 
sive habits withheld from more cursory observation those many traits which rendered him dear to all 
who had the pleasure of his intimate acquaintance and friendship. Archdeacon Loring was in every 
respect, and in the truest sense of the word, “ amiable.” It was impossible to know and pot to love 
him. Honest, plain, and manly integrity ; “ doing to others as he would be done by unaffected humili- 
ty, esteeming others better than himself ; gentlemanly principles and manners and sincere piety, all united 
greatly to endear this respectable man to the now sorrowing circle of his friends. The tenderness and 
goodness of his heart and the delicacy of his feelings, are deeply engraven on hearts, which have been 
soothed and cheered by his kind and affectionate attentions ; while they were also gladdened by the 
innocent- playfulness of his manners, emanating from the peace of a guileless heart. As a tender husband, 
a fond parent, a pious son, an affectionate brother, and a valuable friend, he has left a chasm, which 
nothing here below can fill. 

His religious character will be judged of according to the views and feelings of those who may dwell 
upon his character. If any conceive that Christian faith can only be evinced by the adoption of certain 
modes of thinking and acting, and are content to view him only as an amiable man, they will be far 
from doing him justice, for Christianity entered deeply into his character, and influenced the conduct of 
his life. He regarded religion as an awful thing, and cultivated it in humility of heart, and in faith, 
conscious of his imperfections and demerits, and therefore void of familiarity and presumption. His 
reading was in great measure of a religious kind, and as a proof of the occupation of his mind, when 
sickness most probably called him from his desk to his death-bed, a little book which always lay before 
him, “ Doddridge’s Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul,” was found turned down open to the 
chapter, “ On the soul submitting to Divine examination ; the sincerity of its repentance and faith.” But 
the surest evidence of a truly Christian temper is charity, in its true and scriptural sense, and with this 
grace, Providence had greatly blessed him ; that charity which “ suffereth long and is kind, which envieth 
not, vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not 
easily provoked, thinketh no evil, rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the truth ; which beareth all 
things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things.” Sincere and honest himself, he was 
wholly unsuspicious of others, and was ever ready to view things as favourably as they appeared. If he 
differed in judgment and opinion from others, he did it with firmness, because he acted on principle, 
but without forgetting his own fallibility ; and if he was compelled to condemn, hating to speak ill of 
others, he did it without asperity. His humility was evinced by the directions which he gave at an 
early period of his indisposition to a friend who loved him well, respecting his funeral. 

The sincere regret which follows him, testifies that he was beloved ; and from what we have said (and 
we have not, we think, gone beyond the truth) it will be seen how justly he was so. The veil of eternity 
is withdrawn and this guileless Christian is gone to appear face to face with his Maker in heaven, 
where faith and hope being realized and consummated and where charity holds its blessed reign for ever ! ’ ’ 

His remains were interred in the south Park Street Burial Ground on the 4th of September, 1822. 

The following lines are inscribed to his memory on a white marble Tablet, placed on the south of the 
communion of St. John’s Church. 

Henry Lloyd Loring-, 

First Archdeacon of Calcutta, 
died 4th September 1822, 

Aged 38 years. 

An humble, pure and heavenly-minded heart, 

Beloved in life and lamented in death ; 

This amiable Christian 
has left an impression on the hearts of those 
who knew him, which no time can efface. 

It is written in the deepest lines on theirs, 
who in deference to the humility of his character, 
yet, anxious to record his virtues, have placed 
this simple tablet. 


BISHOP HEBER. 

Reginald Heber, second son of Thomas Heber, and Elizabeth Atherton his wife, was born in the year 
1728. On his elder brother’s death, without heirs male, he succeeded him as Lord of the Manor, and 
patron of the Rectories of Marton in Yorkshire, and of Hodnet in the county of Salop, which last estate 
had, by intermarriage with the house of Vernon, come into the possession of the family. He married 
first Mary, co-heiress of the Rev. Martin Boylie, Rector of Wrentham in Suffolk, who died, leaving one 
son, Richard, late M. P. for the University of Oxford; secondly Mary, daughter of Cuthbert Allanson, 
D. D. by whom he left three children, Reginald, Thomas Cuthbert and Mary. 


12 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


Reginald, the lamented subject of this memoir, was born April 21st 1783, at Malpas in the county 
of Chester, of which his father was for many years co-rector. His early childhood was distinguished by 
mildness of disposition, obedience to his parents, consideration for the feelings of those around him, and 
by that trust in God’s providence which formed, through life, so prominent a part of his character. 
When little more than two years old, he was dangerously ill with the hooping cough, for which he was 
ordered to be bled ; his mother took him on her knees, saying, “ Ur. Currie wished you to loose a little 
blood, 1 hope you will not object;” his answer was, “ 1 will do whatever you please, Mama.” On the 

nurse screaming out that they were going to murder her child, “ poor ,” Reginald said, “ let her 

go down stairs.” The apothecary then took hold of his arm, on which he exclaimed, “ do not hold 
me when assured that if he moved he would be much mgre hurt, “ I wont stir,” he replied, and 
steadily held out his arm, looking the whole time at the operation. 

The following year when travelling with his parents in a very stormy day across the mountainous 
country between Ripon and Craven, his mother was much alarmed and proposed to leave the carriage 
and walk. Reginald, sitting on her knee, said — “ Don’t be afraid, Mama, God will take care of us.” 
These words spoken, as she herself expressed it, by the infant monitor, carried with them conviction to 
her heart which forty-three years of joy and sorrow had not effaced. In ] 787, he had an attack of in- 
flammation of the lungs, and was very dangerously ill. The severe remedies to which he was forced to 
submit, were borne without a murmur, and his patience was so remarkable, that on his father’s asking 
the physician, whether there was any hope of saving his life. Dr. Currie answered, “ if he were not the 
most tractable child I ever saw, there would be none, but I think he will recover.” In childhood he 
suffered much from inflammatory disorders ; but the hours of convalescence were invariably employed 
in endeavouring to acquire information ; and at six years old, after an attack of typhus fever, which 
again nearly brought him to the grave, the first indulgence for which he pleaded was to learn the Latin 
grammar, that he might have some employment, while lying in bed ; he could read the Bible with fluency 
at five years old, and even then was remarkable for me avidity with which he studied it, and for his 
accurate knowledge of its contents. About this time a discussion arose one day, during his absence, 
between his father and some friends as to the book in the old Testament, in which a particular passage 
was to be found. On Reginald’s entering the room, his father referred the question to him, when he 
at once named both the book and the chapter. 

It was by Mr. Heber’s direction that the Bible was first put into his hands in preference to any 
abridgment of it, in order that he might become more familiar with its beautiful language and more 
ready in applying it to the memory with which he was singularly endowed. He greatly profited by this 
system, and its effects were visible in the piety winch marked his youth and became his distinguishing 
characteristic through life. 

He very early became sensible of the necessity and importance of praying, and was frequently over- 
heard praying aloud in his own room, when he little thought himself within reach of observation. His 
sense of entire dependence upon God and of thankfulness for the mercies which he received was deep 
and almost instinctive. In joy, as in sorrow, his heart was ever lifted up in thankfulness for the 
goodness of his Maker, or bowed in resignation to his chastisements, and his first impulse, when afflicted 
or rejoicing, was to fall on his knees in thanksgiving, or in intercession for himself and for those he 
loved, through the mediation of his Saviour. He had a considerable taste for drawings, especially for 
architectural designs, and the favourite sketches almost entirely from fancy, which have been preserved 
by his family, bear strong marks of genius and bore promise of the superiority which, with little or no 
instruction, he afterwards attained in that art. The study of natural liistory was also a favourite pursuit, 
and he was fond of exercising his powers of observation in watching the changes of insects and the 
various habits of animals and birds ; but the kindness of his heart would never permit him to keep any 
creatures in confinement, far less to gratify his curiosity at the expense of their sufferings. When his 
little sister had a squirrel given her, he persuaded her to set it at liberty, taking her to a tree that she 
might see the animal’s joy at being restored to freedom. His mind seemed never to be at rest, and occa- 
sionally, when with his piay-fellows, he would remain silent, absorbed in his own meditations, and insen- 
sible so every thing around him, as his memory retained the information he acquired from every possible 
source, as his understanding strengthened, he corrected the errors into which his almost unassisted 
researches in various branches of knowledge naturally led him. From a child he was inquisitive, and 
always eager to obtain instruction, and never above asking the opinions of others, but with a modesty 
of manner, and an evident anxiety to acquire knowledge, which prevented his being thought intrusive, 
and insured him the attention of those with whom he conversed. In this habit he persevered through 
life, and to it he attributed much of the desultory knowledge which he had attained. 

It was a common saying among the servants of the family, that Mr. Reginald never was in a passion. 
It is not of course intended to assert that he was insensible to the natural emotions of anger, but that, 
even in childhood, he had so completely acquired the habit of subduing the outward expression of this 
feeling, that he was never heard to raise his voice in anger or to use an impatient expression. Reading 
was his principal amusement from the time he knew his letters ; his elder brother, (to whose affectionate 
superintendence through life of his graver studies, he justly considered himself much indebted,) used to 
say, “ Reginald did more than read books, he devoured them.” And when thus occupied, it was with 
difficulty that his attention could be withdrawn. 

After prosecuting his studies for some time at Dr. Bristow’s Academy, in the neighbourhood of 
London, he was entered at Brazenose College, Oxford, and in 1802, he gained the University prize for 
a copy of Latin hexameters. In the spring of 1803 he wrote his celebrated Poem of Palestine, for 
which in that year, he also obtained a prize. In 1805, he took the degree of B.A. and soon afterwards 
gained a third University prize for an essay on the Sense of Honour, after having been elected a Fellow 
of All Souls, he quitted Oxford, and proceeded on a tour through Germany, Russia and the Crimea ; 
during which he made several excellent notes, afterwards appended to the travels of Dr. Clarke. 

On his return to England in 1808, he published a Political Poem entitled “ Europelines on the pre- 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


I n 

O 

sent war.” He now retired with his wife, a daughter of Dr. Shipley, Dean of St. Asaph, to the living 
of Hodnet, to which he had recently been presented ; and for sometime wholly devoted himself to the 
humble but important duties of his station. In 1815, he preached at the Brampton lecture, a series oi 
sermons, which lie published in the following year, “ on the personality and office of the Christian Com- 
forter.” About the same time he composed several articles for a Dictionary of the Bible, and printed 
a discourse which he had delivered before the Bishop of Chester. In 1822, he was appointed Preacher 
at Lincoln’s Inn ; and produced a life of Jeremy Taylor, prefixed to a new edition of that eminent 
writer’s productions. Soon afterwards, he was offered the Bishopric of Calcutta ; which, after twice 
refusing, he at length, on the suggestion of his wife, consented to accept, and embarked for the East 
Indies, in June 1820. On the 10th of October, he landed at Calcutta. 

On his landing in India, the Bishop found a much greater accumulation of ecclesiastical business 
awaiting his arrival, than he had expected ; it was such as almost to alarm him, not only by its extent, 
but by the importance of the questions immediately brought for his decision, and which his complete 
ignorance of the circumstances of that Diocese rendered still more perplexing. 

Immediately after Bishop Heber’s arrival in India, he undertook the management of every thing 
connected with the College, and assumed, as Visitor, the power of inspecting its internal arrangement. 
Since the death of its founder, the building had, from various causes (especially from the want of money) 
been much retarded ; but under his inspection, and with the assistance of the annual liberal grant from 
the Church Missionary Society, its progress was rapid. The first Missionaries whom the Parent Society 
sent out, Messrs. Morton and Christian, arrived in Calcutta soon after the Bishop ; but as they could 
not, at the time, be received into the College, he appointed them to superintend two circles of Bengallee 
Schools, supported by the Society for “ promoting Christian knowledge,” while they were, at the same 
time, acquiring the necessary knowledge of the languages. In January 1824, Mr. Mill, the Principle 
Professor, with his wife and family, took up his residence in the College, and in the course of the spring, 
a third Missionary from the Society, Mr. Tweddle, and four students, were admitted. 

In 1825, the Bishop preached at Bombay, Colombo, and Calcutta, on behalf of the Society for Pro- 
pagating the Gospel, more especially with reference to the wants of the Mission College, and very con- 
siderable sums were then collected. With the money thus obtained, the College works went rapidly on. 
The second and the third Professors, Messrs. Holmes and Craven, accompanied by Mr. DeMellow, a 
native Portuguese Indian, who had been educated at Cambridge, and ordained by the Bishop of Lon- 
don for the Society’s Missions, arrived in the autumn of 1825. 

The Bishop on his arrival required that all the Church Missionaries should report their names, ap- 
pointments and letters of orders to the Archdeacons of the respective Presidencies, for the purpose of 
being transmitted to him, that their regular licenses might be made out and returned, in the same 
manner as was observed with the Company’s Chaplains. In Calcutta, a meeting of the Church Mis- 
sionary Society’s Associations which had recently been formed in connexion with and by the friends of 
the Church Missionary Parent Society, and of which the Bishop was requested to become the President, 
w r as called on the 2nd of December, succeeding his arrival. In the course of its proceedings a resolution 
was proposed “ that every Missionary of the Society should, on his arrival in Bengal, wait on the Bishop 
for his license, at the same time he was appointed one of the Vice-Presidents of the Asiatic Society 
in Calcutta ; but was prevented, by his more important duties, from taking the active part in their 
proceedings, to which the interest he felt in their researches would have prompted him. He, however, 
attended their meetings whenever it was in his power to do so. 

The scarcity of Chaplains in the Bengal Presidency and the bad health of some of those who were 
resident in Calcutta, made the Bishop feel it necessary to perform as much, or more, duty than he had 
been accustomed to in England. 

When the Bishop landed in Bengal he took the office of President of the Diocesan Committee of the 
Christian Society, established in Calcutta ; the native schools, and the various branches of the Society’s 
labours in that city shared, in common with other religious societies, much of his time and exertion, and, 
as will be- hereafter seen, the interests of their missions powerfully engrossed his attention during his 
last visitation of the southern provinces of the continent of India. 

On the 15th of June 1824, the Bishop began his extensive visitation unaccompanied, save by his 
Domestic Chaplain and his native servants. He proceeded to Dacca, Benares, Meerut, Delhi, Agra, by 
Neemuch and Mhow, to the Northern Churches of the Archdeaconry, and so on to Bombay, Poonah, 
and Sholapoor, Madras, Goozerat, &c. The Bishop, in his visitation, inspected the schools, confirmed the 
I native Christians, and administered the sacrament, manifesting in every place the liveliest interest in 
1 the Missionary cause and gladdening the Church by his presence. 

On his return to Calcutta, he put his original intention into execution of forming a District Committee 
i of the Society for the propagation of the Gospel, on the same footing with those of Bombay and Ceylon ; 
i and he addressed letters to residents in Calcutta, and to all the influential persons with whom he had 
I become acquainted on his tour through the Upper Provinces, requesting their assistance in forwarding 
his view. He had the gratification of receiving, from almost every quarter, handsome subscriptions and 
promises of future assistance. 

In December 1825 the Bishop admitted to Episcopal ordination, together with several other candi- 
i dates, Abdool Mussed, a convert of Archdeacon Corrie’s, and a man of considerable attainments. Early 
i in 1826, the Bishop, accompanied by Mr. Robison, visited Chinsurah, about 20 miles from Calcutta ; 
preached on the Sunday, both morning and evening, and was occupied the following morning in looking 
over an old house, which had long been the abode of bats and snakes, for the purpose of deciding on its 
capability of forming a permanent residence for the clergyman and for the establishment of a school. 
Here he caught a fever, which confined him to his room for several days after his return to Calcutta. 
There was one peculiarity attending this illness which threw some light on the cause of the last fatal 
event at Trichinopoly. The affection of the head with which Bengal fever is invariably accompanied, 
produced so great a degree of deafness that he could hardly hear the questions of the medical men who 


14 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


attended liim, nor did this symptom immediately decrease when the fever subsided. Soon after his 
recovery, he sailed for Madras, where he arrived late in February, and was received with great kindness 
by Sir Thomas Munro, and by all the members of the Madras Government. For his intended visitation 
the Bishop, with his accustomed indifference to personal comforts, had only applied for the services of a 
Native Doctor in case of illness among his escort and servants ; but the Government not only appointed 
one of the best Surgeons on the Madras Establishment to attend on him, but directed the Town Major 
to provide every thing for his comfort and accommodation which the heat of the weather would permit ; 
notwithstanding, a feeling, prophetic of the fatal event, seems to have existed in Sir Thomas Munro s 
mind ; for he more than once expressed an earnest wish that “ the Bishop’s visitation might not end 
ill.” He left Madras on the 13th March 1826, with cordial feelings of attachment to the inhabitant, 
and increased interest in this important portion of his diocese. On the 17th he arrived at Pondicherry, 
after an intensely hot march, and found tents pitched on a burning sand about a mile from the town. 
On the 18th reached Cuddalore, and left it on the 21st, making a night’s run to Chillumbra. On the 
25th he arrived at Tanjore, which he left on the 30th of March, and reached Trichinopoly on the 1st 
April. On Sunday the 2d April, the morning after his arrival, he preached at the Government Church ; 
in the afternoon he confirmed 42 persons. As soon as he returned home from the performance of 
this duty, he complained, for the first time, of a slight head-ache and general feeling of languor. At 
daybreak on the fatal 3d of April, he went to the Mission Church- in the Fort, where services were 
performed in the Tamul language, after which he confirmed 15 Natives in their own language; and 
again delivered his address on confirmation ; he afterwards went to the Mission House and examined 
into the state of the schools. On his arrival at home (Mr. Bird’s house) before he took off his robes, 
he went into Mr. Robison’s room, and sitting down by his bedside, entered with energy into the 
concerns of his Mission. His interest had been much excited by all that he had seen. He spoke with 
sorrow of the poverty which the house displayed, and remarked how necessary it was for the Bishop to 
have regular reports from every mission in India, that he might at least know the wants and necessities 
of all. He then retired into his own room, and, according to his invariable custom, wrote on the back 
of the address on confirmation, Trichinopoly, April 3d, 1826. This was his last act; for immediately 
on taking off his clothes, he went into a large cold bath, where he had bathed the two. preceding morn- 
ings, but which was now the destined agent of his removal to paradise. Half an hour after, his servant, 
alarmed at his long absence, entered the room and found him a lifeless corpse ! Every means to restore 
animation which human skill or friendship could suggest, was resorted to ; but the vital spark was 
extinguished and his blessed spirit had then entered upon its career of immortality, and perhaps was at 
that moment looking down with fond pity on the exertions of those who would fain have recalled it to 
its earthly habitation, to endure again the trials and temptations of the world it had quitted. His 
mortal remains were attended to the grave with the highest honours, and followed by the tears of the 
inhabitants of Trichinopoly. They rest on the north side of the altar in St. John’s Church. 

The government of Madras also ordered a marble to be placed over his grave and a Mural Tablet to 
be erected to his memory in St. John’s Church at Tichinopoly, with the following Inscription : — 

Sacred 

to the memory of 
Reginald Heber, D.D. 

Lord Bishop of Calcutta, 
who was here 

suddenly called to his eternal rest, 
during his visitation 

of the southern provinces of his extensive Diocese, 
on the 3d of April, A. D. MDCCCXXVI. 

“ Be ye also ready.” 


Monuments are erected to his memory also in Madras, Bombay, Colombo, in the Parish Church of 
Hodnet (and in the Bishop’s College of Calcutta). A marble Statue was also erected under the Eastern 
Portico of St. John’s Cathedral, Calcutta, and has been recently removed to that of St. Paul’s in Chow- 
r inghee. 

The following lines are copied from the Tablet erected in the Bishop’s College Chapel. 

M. S. 

viri admodum Reverendi 
Reginaldi Heber, S. T. P. 

Diceceseos Calcuttensis Episcopi Alterius 
Scriptoris perelegantis et suavissimi 
Gentium et morum investig'atoris curiosi Poet® exirnii 
Christianas Fidei praeconis in primis laudandi Quern 
Ingenii doctrinaeque praeconis cumulation 
Alumnum gratissimum academia Oxoniensis 
Sacerdotum pium dilectum rusticus suus castus 
Amicum dulcissimum propinque et sodales 
Antistitem venerandum carum. 

Hujus regionis incolae atque indigenae etiam etlmici 
Mirabili consensu agnoverunt 
Nunc repentinae morte abreptum 
Siemmo desiderio ct cuctu reminiscuntur 
Natus inter angles salopienses, 

Obiit Trichinopoli in Provincia Madrassensi, 

. III. non Aprilis A.D. MDCCCXXVI. /Etatis XL111. Episcopalus 111. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


15 


BISHOP J. T. JAMES. 


John Thomas James, D.D. late Bishop of Calcutta, was born on the 23rd January 1 786, at Reigby, 
in Warwickshire, and was the eldest of eight children, which Dr. James had, by his second marriage 
with Arabella, daughter of William Caldecott, Esq. He received the rudiments of his education at 
Reigby School, under the immediate eye of his father ; till, at the age of twelve, he was placed on the 
foundation at the Charter-house, by the late Earl of Dartmouth, one of the Governors of that Institu- 
tion, where he soon won the good opinion of the head master, Dr. M. Raine. Besides distinguishing 
himself in the several studies of the School, he here began to show considerable talent for drawing, and 
in 1803 the first prize medal was awarded to him, by the Society for the encouragement of Arts and 
Sciences, for a drawing of Worcester Cathedral. His own inclination, at this time, was to go to sea, and 
he showed great fondness for every pursuit connected with naval tactics ; but at the earnest wish ot his 
mother, he forbore to indulge the inclination, and soon began to turn his mind to that profession, in 
which he afterwards attained so high a rank. 

After he had been selected to deliver the annual oration at the Charter-house, in May 1804, lie was 
removed to Christ’s Church, Oxford, where he entered as a commoner ; but had scarcely begun to reside 
there, when the death of his father deprived him, at once, of his best instructor and ablest guide. He 
soon after was examined for his B. A. degree, and continued to reside at Chi'ist’s Church, where he was 
deprived of his books and drawings, and indeed of all that he possessed, by an alarming fire ! It may be 
worth mentioning, as characteristic of Mr. James, that, bereft as he was of all his little property, so 
soon as he found that the flames were extinguished, he calmly set down and made a sketch of the fire, 
from which he afterwards finished a large drawing ! 

After proceeding to the degree of M. A. in 1810, he became a tutor in Christ’s Church, till an 
opportunity occurred of indulging his wish to see foreign countries. In 1813, he went to the conti- 
nent, and on returning back to England, Mr. James published his travels in one volume, of which three 
editions were called for in succession. At the wish of his friends he published a series of views taken 
during his tour. In 1816 he visited Italy, and soon after his return, was admitted to Holy orders, 
resigning his studentship at Christ’s Church, on being presented by the Dean and Chapter to the small 
vicarage of Flitton. Here he followed those literary pursuits, to which he had become deeply attached, 
and published “ the Italian Schools of Painting,” the success of which work led him to publish in 1822 
“ the Flemish, Dutch, and German Schools he had it in contemplation to proceed to the painters of 
the English School, and also those of France and Spain ; but his attention was now engrossed by a 
more serious subject. In consequence of the daring attacks of infidels upon Christianity, he published 
a volume entitled “ the Semi-sceptic, or the common sense of religion considered.” 

In 1823, he married Marianne Jane, fourth daughter of T. Reeves, Esq, to whom alone, during his 
illness in India, he was indebted for all the earthly comfort that smoothed his bed of suffering in the last 
hours of his life. 

In 1826, when the intelligence reached England that the see of Calcutta had become a second time 
vacant by the lamented death of Bishop Heber, an invitation was transmitted to Mr. James to fill that 
highly responsible situation. Upon receiving the offer, he at first declined it ; but being afterwards 
strongly advised to reconsider his objections, he determined to consult the best medical advisers as to 
the fitness of his constitution for enduring the climate of India. Finding that two able Physicians, who 
were acquainted both with his constitution and the climate of India, coincided in opinion, that there 
was nothing in the state of his health which ought to deter him from going to that country, he felt 
that he could no longer answer his own conscience if he declined a post on account of its danger, and 
therefore made up his mind to accept it. 

The University of Oxford paid him the compliment of conferring on him the degree of D.D. by 
Diploma, and on Whit-Sunday, June 3d, he was consecrated Bishop of Calcutta. On the 9th July he 
quitted London with Mrs. James, and leaving their two elder children under the care of Mr. and Mrs. 
Reeves, set out for Portsmouth. 

On Friday, January 17th, 1827, the vessel on which he had embarked, arrived off Kedgeree, and was 
riding at anchor there when the long-wished for steamer was seen making her way towards it. Arch- 
deacon Corrie, Dr. Mill, Mr. Eales and Mr. Abbott, were on board to pay their respects to their new 
Diocesan, as were also Mr. W. Cracroft, Mr. A. Prinsep and some other private friends, who accom- 
panied the Bishop and his family on board the Steamer amidst the waiving of hats and salutes ; as 
soon as they landed, the Bishop was immediately conducted by the aid-de-camp of the Governor Gene- 
ral to the Government House, where he was most kindly welcomed by Lord Amherst. The next day, 
being Sunday, the whole party with gratified hearts went to the Cathedral, where the Bishop was 
received by the Archdeacon and Clergy and enthroned with the usual ceremonies in that seat which was 
shortly to be again vacant by his decease. 


The business of the Diocese, at all times too much for the charge of one Bishop, had fallen into most 
extensive arrear during the vacancy of the See; many important cases had been awaiting the Bishop’s 
arrival, and he found that they embraced matters of no ordinary delicacy and anxiety. To these, he 
immediately directed his whole attention ; leaving the arrangement of his household and domestic affairs 

to Mrs. James. 

The first object which engaged his attention was the advantage which would arise, if each of the 
Company’s chaplains could have some particular district assigned to him, within which it should be his 
duty to visit the sick and perform all parochial duties : — for this purpose, he divided the city-of Calcutta 
into three ecclesiastical districts, the new Church in Fort William making a fourth. The benefit arising 
■from these divisions was obvious to all, and was promulgated, with a plan of the districts annexed^ 
under the sanction of the Governor General, in a Gazette extraordinary April 3d, 1828. 

On the 10th of March the Bishop appointed Mr. Robinson, Chaplain to the late Bishop Heber, to 
the vacant Archdeaconry of Madras. This was the only piece of preferment which it fell to his lotto bestow. 


16 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


The time had now arrived when the Bishop was to commence the visitation of his Diocese, and he 
had decided to commence with the Presidency of Bengal ; which alone he expected would occupy him 
for eight or nine months. Arrangements for this purpose were made with all possible expedition, 
because, since his arrival in India, he had undergone repeated attacks of illness, and was much 
weakened by their force. Dr. Nicolson seemed to think that great benefit might be expected from the 
bracing air of the river ; accordingly, on the 24th June, the Bishop left Calcutta for the Upper Provinces. 

On the 10th July, he reached Bhaugulpore and felt the passage favorable to the recovery of his 
strength, while pursuing his journey, “ In hope and not in fear,” as he often expressed to her in whose 
affectionate confidence every feeling of his heart reposed. About noon the Bishop was this day so ill, 
that he could not land till the evening ; he was then, with difficulty, moved on shore to the house ot 
Mr. Nisbet, the Magistrate. The pain in his side had increased with such alarming violence that it 
excited the worst apprehensions ; medical assistance was promptly and vigorously engaged. The doctors 
urged an immediate return to Calcutta, but it was not till Wednesday July 23d, that the Bishop and 
Mrs. James returned to their pinnace and began to retrace their voyage, when they reached the 
metropolis on Thursday the 31st (a council-day) just in time to send in a letter to the Government 
before the Council broke up ; the Governor General and Lady William Bentinck immediately sent to 
offer the use of Government House, which was near the river ; but Dr. Nicolson came on board and 
wished him to remain on the pinnace, desiring however that no time should be lost in getting out to 
sea ; Penang was considered the best place for the present, until the patient had recovered strength 
sufficient for a voyage to England. 

On Wednesday the 6th August, the Bishop left Chaundpaul Ghaut, proceeding to the H. C. Ship 
“ Marquis Huntley,” which was then lying in Saugor Roads and ready to proceed on her voyage to 
China ; on the evening of Saturday the 9th of August, the party reached the “ Marquis Huntley,” and 
his Lordship was soon comfortably placed on a sofa in the cabin ; his spirits were raised by finding 
himself at sea ; he was free from pain ; he thought he was certainly better, and for some days the 
hopes of all around him were raised ; but the shivering fits which shortly came on, followed by violent 
perspirations and the most distressing hiccups, convinced Dr. Spens, and others that he was really getting 
worse. On Thursday the 21st a great and unhappy alteration had taken place, though he still thought 
himself better. Mrs. James, seeing this, made up her mind, with the fortitude which became her, to the 
trying task of communicating to him the awful truth. Great was her agony in this afflicting hour ; but 
her sobs were suppressed for the sake of him whose slumbers she was watching. It was his delight, 
that she should regularly read to him some portion of the Scriptures every morning. She at length 
disclosed to him the delusiveness of his hopes, and the reality of his situation. After a momentary 
pause, he thanked her most warmly, and said, ‘‘If it is so, my hope and my firm faith is in Jesus 
Christ !” He afterwards determined that they should receive the Holy Sacrament together the next 
morning ; and at intervals, in the course of the evening, calmly gave directions about his papers ; and 
having instructed Mr. Knapp, to add a few lines which he directed to a document relating to the 
Bishop’s College, with great effort he held the pen, while his hand was guided to make his signature to 
it ; having so done, he observed, “ now every thing is off my hands.” 

The next morning, August 22nd, 1828, he received the Sacrament with Mrs. James, at the hands 
of Mr. Knapp, and afterwards made many Christian reflections on the state of the soul, while, strength 
remained for utterance, but now, only in a low whisper. As evening came on, it was evident he was 
sinking, and that the hour which was to close his useful and active life, was drawing near. The feet 
became cold and the eyes dull, the hands refused any longer to answer the grasp of affection, he sunk 
into a dose, and at nine o’clock quietly resigned his spirit into the hands of his Creator and Redeemer. 

It was thus in the second year of his consecration for the government of the Indian Church that 
Bishop James departed. His mind was, by nature, quick and vigorous ; and to the acquirements of a 
scholar and a highly cultivated taste in the fine arts, he added a large stock of general information, the 
result, not only of private study, but of much travel in foreign countries, and acute observation of human 
nature. Such accomplishments, united with sound judgment, most conciliating manners, and the more 
sterling recommendations of real Christian benevolence, and a warm and generous heart, readily won 
for him the esteem and regard of all who knew him, and made him the chosen adviser, not of Ins family 
only, but of the entire circle of his friends. 


BISHOP TURNER. 

It is due to the memory of this excellent Prelate, and may not be unacceptable to those who feel an 
interest in the progressive improvement of British India, to take some notice of the events by which 
that progress has been marked during the brief period of his Episcopate ; events in the accomplishments 
of which he himself took so prominent a part. 

That period did not exceed one year and seven months, of which eight only were passed at Calcutta 
and yet, during this short space of time, he originated so many useful and benevolent measures, that 
brief as it was, it must always be viewed as au important era in the history of this settlement. 

The object of these remarks being merely to give, an account of what has taken place since his Lord- 
ship’s arrival in India, it would, in some degree, interfere with the plan to enter on a detailed review of 
the earlier occurrences of his life. It will therefore be sufficient to observe, that he completed his 
education at Christ’s church, Oxford, where he gained the notice and friendship of Dr. Cyril Jackson, 
then the distinguished Dean of that College. He was afterwards selected by the Lord Chancellor 
Ellenborough, as Preceptor to an only son, with whom he resided some time at Eton, and travelled over 
much of Europe. At the period of his appointment to India, Dr. Turner was rector of Wilmslow, a 
large manufacturing Parish in Cheshire, and chaplain to his brother-in-law, the Bishop of Chester. In 
these situations he acquired that experience in the art of education, that knowledge of the operation of 
charitable Institutions, and that zeal for the sacred duties of the profession to which he belonged, the 


■ . . ■ ' ■- 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


17 


beneficial application of which has, since his death, called forth from the different religious, charitable 
and philanthropic Associations of which he was the head, the most grateful acknowledgments. 

One of the first things which struck the late Bishop, on his arrival in India, was the indispensable 
necessity of taking steps to encourage a due observance of the Lord’s-day, among the Christian com- 
munity. Having only recently quitted a part of the world where that observance is enforced by law, 
he thought it incumbent on him at least to invite the voluntary practice of it in Calcutta, and by that 
means prevail, if possible, with its Christian inhabitants, generally, to set an example, which the Govern- 
ment itself, yielding to the force of public opinion, might perhaps eventually be brought to imitate. He 
was aware that his predecessors, Bishops Middleton and Heber, the one officially and the other privately, 
had endeavoured to prevail on the Government to enforce such observance in the Public Departments, 
although without success ; but thought that an application from the Christian community at large, after 
agreeing to conform to it themselves, might be more effectual. With this view, he circulated a paper, 
inviting all sincere Christians to declare that they would personally in their families, and to the utmost 
limits of their influence, adopt and encourage others to such measures as might tend to establish a 
decent and orderly observance of the Lord’s-day ; that, as far as depended on themselves, they would 
neither employ, nor allow others to employ on their behalf, or in their service, on that day, Native 
workmen and artizans in the exercise of their ordinary calling ; that they would give a preference to 
those Christian Tradesmen who were willing to adopt this regulation, and to act upon it constantly and 
unreservedly in the management of their business, and that they would be ready, when it might be 
deemed expedient, to join in presenting an address to the Right Honourable the Governor General in 
Council, praying that orders might be issued to suspend all labour on public works upon the Lord’s- 
day, as well as all such business in the Government offices, as could without embarrassment to the 
service, be dispensed with. The expressions used in this paper, are those of the acts of the British Parlia- 
ment which is in force on the subject. The declaration, as already stated, was framed only for Christians, 
and especially for those who are convinced of the duty of attending to Christian obligations. Its purpose 
was to invite and to encourage the voluntary practice of those observances which in England are enforced 
by law. Christian individuals were expected to pursue a Christian object on Christian principles ; and yet 
this measure, so strictly in accordance with what his situation as head of the established Church in India 
rendered it proper in the Bishop to adopt, was met by a portion of the community professing themselves 
Christians, with a degree of hostility and misrepresentation for which no difference of opinion, as to 
mere expediency of the course proposed to be pursued for effecting an object so desirable in a Christian 
point of view, can we conceive, be considered by any reflecting person, as a sufficient apology. When 
warned which he previously was, of the obloquy that would, probably, be cast upon him for the attempt, 
he replied, that personal considerations of that sort would never deter him from doing his duty. He 
persevered, and the result proved the anticipation to have been too well founded. He had, however, 
the satisfaction of knowing that notwithstanding the hostility and misrepresentations in question, the 
object in view, namely, the due observance of the Lord’s-day, was, even here, extensively promoted by 
the measure, and at one of the sister Presidencies, his endeavours for the same purpose were, afterwards, 
still more successful. 

The next important step taken by Bishop Turner was the formation of the District Charitable Society. 
There was already in Calcutta a charitible fund for the relief of distressed Europeans and others, estab- 
lished in the year 1800, chiefly by the exertions of the late Rev. David Brown, which continued 
to be administered by the select vestry of St. John’s Cathedral ; but however well adapted the vestry 
may have been, for the distribution of the charitable funds of Calcutta some years ago, the number of 
European Paupers had multiplied to so great an extent, that it had become necessary to provide for the 
more full investigation of the cases of applicants for relief. Frauds, the most gross, were practised on 
the public with such facility, that impostors, speculating on the benevolence of the community and 
making as it were mendicity a trade, have, it is understood, found no difficulty in procuring from money 
lenders, advances, 'proportionate in amount to the probability of success, which the acquisition of certain 
leading names to their applications for relief, justified a reasonable expectation of ultimately obtaining. 
To remedy these inconveniencies, some comprehensive arrangement was obviously required, and at the 
Bishop’s suggestion, the Society alluded to was established. It consists of several subordinate com- 
mittees, corresponding in number with the Ecclesiastical Districts into which the town is divided, and 
of a central committee of superintendence. Of this committee any individual subscribing 100 Rs. per 
(annum becomes a member. The former are charged with the distribution of the funds, the latter deter- 
:mine the principle on which the distribution is to be made and dispose of cases specially referred to them 
for consideration. It is only necessary further to add, that the Society has met with the most cordial 
support, both from the Government and the community, and that its operations are progressively in- 
creasing, both in interest and importance. To the frauds, above alluded to, it has put an effectual 
■check, by affording all, to whom applications may be preferred for relief, the means of ascertaining by 
reference to the Central Committee, or to the committee of the District in which they reside, the charac- 
ter and circumstances of the applicants, and of procuring immediate succour for them if necessary. It 
•is almost superfluous to add that the operations of such a Society, so constituted and so supported, can 
be viewed in no other light than as a benefit to the community — a benefit for which it is originally in- 
debted to the late Bishop, as appears from the following resolution proposed by the Honorable Sir 
■Edward Ryan, at a meeting of the Central Committee, held on the 18th July 1831, and carried una- 
nimously. 

“ That this Committee have received with feelings of the deepest regret, the distressing intelligence of 
the demise of their highly respected president, The Right Reverend The Lord Bishop of Calcutta, and in 
the painful record of this melancholy event desire to express their grateful sense of those zealous and 
benevolent exertions which induced the formation of the District Charitable Society, and of that kind and 
.unremitting attention with which its operations were ever regarded by His Lordship.” 

The providing additional accommodation for public worship was the next object that engaged the 


18 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCII. 


Bishop’s attention, and arrangements were accordingly brought forward by him, through which no less 
than three churches have been added to the settlement. 

First, the Church at the Free School, which not only enables the whole of the children of that establish- 
ment to attend public worship on the School premises, but has proved of great convenience to the whole 
of the neighbourhood in which it is situated ; next, the Mariner’s Church near the strand, for affording 
the opportunity of divine service to seamen belonging to ships in the river ; and lastly, the Church at 
Howrah, which cannot fail to be of the most extensive convenience to the numerous inhabitants residing 
in that quarter. These arrangements were all effected without any expense to Government. 

But it was not the spiritual interests of Christians alone, that occupied Dr. Turner’s attention. He 
felt the deepest concern in the operations of Missionary establishments generally, and in all proceedings 
set on foot for the purpose of disseminating Christianity among the Natives. For the furtherance of the 
views of the Calcutta Church Missionary Society, of which he was the Patron, he was earnestly engaged 
in divising plans and making arrangements, when his last illness overtook him. The Diocesan Com- 
mitees of the Society for Promoting Christian knowledge and of the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel, have recorded their grateful sense of the attention paid by him to the interest of these bodies, 
and at the annual meeting of the Calcutta Auxiliary Church Missionary Society, held in the old Church- 
rooms on the 26th of July 1831, the following resolution was passed unanimously : “ That this meet- 
ing receives with deep regret the sad and mournful intelligence of the irreparable loss which the Society 
has sustained by the demise of the Lord Bishop of Calcutta, the zealous patron, and steady friend and 
advocate of the Missionary cause, and begs to record the grateful sense which it entertains of the distin- 
guished services rendered by his Lordship, both in the plans suggested, and the labours undertaken to 
promote the interests of that cause, during the short period he was spared.” 

But the measures from which the greatest benefits may be expected to be derived, are those intro- 
duced by the Bishop to improve the system of public instruction, and which, had he been spared to 
see them carried into effect, would in all probability have realised, on that head, as much as is attain- 
able in this distant quarter. With him originated the Infant School ; — the first which was ever institu- 
ted, at least in this part of India, and the whole expense of which w r as borne by him till his death. In 
the Christian Intelliyenccr for October 1830, this Institution is spoken of as follows : — 

“ It is highly gratifying to see the facility with which some of the children add and substract by 
means of the Abacus, and the progress the elder ones have made in reading, writing, and needle-work, 
is quite surprising. Indeed altogether the scene is highly interesting. Every humane heart must 
rejoice to see so many infants snatched like ‘brands from the fire,’ and placed in an Institution where 
their innocent and tender minds v r ill be trained up in the fear of the Lord, and in habits of order, clean- 
liness, and usefulness. The Bishop of the Diocese has, we think, done much for the rising generation 
in establishing this interesting Institution, and we trust the example will be followed not only in all the 
Parochial districts of Calcutta, but likewise in other large towns, and also in the other Presidencies of 
India.” 

The plan of the High School (now St. Paul’s School) was likewise arranged by him. He drew up 
the proposal for establishing it by proprietary shares, engaged for it the services of an able Rector, 
regulated the course of instruction to be pursued in it, and when opportunity offered, gave it the bene- 
fit of his own personal superintendence. The nature of this Institution, and the system of education 
pursued were fully explained at a meeting held for the purpose on the 2d of August, 1831, at wdiich the 
Honorable Sir C. E. Grey took a leading part, and to which the following resolution w 7 as carried una- 
nimously : — “ That this meeting receives with deep regret the melancholy intimation of the decease of 
their late respected Chairman, the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of the Diocese, whose zeal in pro- 
moting the cause of education upon the only principles which can render it beneficial to mankind ; 
whose unwearied labours in forwarding the best interests of all around him, and whose amiable dis- 
positions, unassuming manners, and easiness of access, must cause his decease to be considered as a 
heavy calamity to the community at large, and to this institution in particular, wdrich has in his death 
to deplore the loss of an able, experienced, and warm friend ; and they take this opportunity of re- 
cording their grateful sense of the services he had rendered the graduated system of which he thus laid 
the foundation, and which was intended, by means of the Infant School, the Free School, the High 
School, and Bishop’s College, to provide for the intellectual wants of infancy, childhood, youth and open- 
ing manhood, would have left nothing in this respect for the Christian community to require ; but his 
views, as already stated, were not confined merely to the community ; he saw in the state of things 
which had already been effected, an opening through which Christian instruction might be successfully 
imparted to the natives ; and as he was convinced that no other description of education would ever ren- 
der them what it is desireable they should become, namely, well-principled, well-informed, and well- 
conducted members of society, he was therefore determined to avail himself of every favorable opportu- 
nity that offered for directing their views to this object.” Before proceeding to Benares, in June 1830 
he visited the different native schools and colleges in which so much progress has been made in the ac- 
quisition of European literature and science, and he was greatly surprized and delighted with what he 
saw. On his return from his primary visitation of the other Presidencies, several of the students waited 
upon him, and testified the strongest disposition to cultivate the most cordial communication with him. 
He had purchased, at a considerable expense, various astronomical and mathematical instruments, for 
the purpose of assisting them in the prosecution of their studies in the higher branches of those sciences 
and he was in hopes that the minds of the native youth, who might thus by degrees collect themselves 
around him, would, in the progress of these pursuits be led to look “ through nature, up to Nature’s 
God.” But these hopes he was never permitted to realize, and all that remains to be said is little more 
than a recital of what took place at the closing hours of his life, and which, by those who reflect, that 
their own last hour must, sooner or later, likewise arrive, cannot, fail to be studied with advantage. It 
is not our intention to dwell on any thing that took place during his visitation at the other Presidencies. 
Suffice it to say, that he quitted Calcutta for Madras on the 18th September 1830 ; from Madras he 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


19 


proceeded, overland, to Bombay, from Bombay, to Ceylon, whence, after having been engaged m va- 
rious arduous duties at the several stations, he quitted. After having been exposed by land and sea, to 
the most exhausting heat and fatigue, he returned to Calcutta on the 4th ot May 18.31, a dying man. 
One circumstance, however, we cannot omit to notice, because it affects a body ot men to whom the 
testimony of such an individual cannot be indifferent, and which but for this opportunity would perhaps 
have been lost for ever. In a letter to a friend dated Colombo, March the 17, 1831, lie wrote as follows : 
“ I have been much interested by what I have. seen and heard in Ceylon. A very useful lesson may 
be learned here, especially important to those who, like myself, are apt to growl at the Company s 
domination. Every measure we would desire to see adopted in India may be found in actual opeiation 
in Ceylon : there is no restraint on colonization ; the Government avoids interfering in mercantile con- 
cerns, (except as respects the sale of cinnamon and pearls ;) trial by Jury is fully established ; in a 
great part of the Island, there is an extensive and systematic provision for Government schools, and 
yet every thing languishes. There is no spirit of improvement ; industry, either commercial oi agri- 
cultural, seems altogether unknown ; and the finest Island in the world, rich in spontaneous productions, 
richer still in those which might be procured by labour, with noble harbours and a situation that com - 
mands the commerce of the eastern world, is scantily peopled, and of that scanty population a very 
large proportion are miserably fed, and they are liable almost periodically to severe famine. What 
can be the secret of all this ? However, as matters stand, if you wish to ascertain how completely 
good institutions may be nullified, you may come to Ceylon ; and on the other hand to know how theo- 
retical evils may be cured, you must make such a journey as I have done, through the three presi- 
dencies of India. I am satisfied that there is no Government in the world so well served as that of the 
East Indian Company. I mean that no service I ever knew or heard of comprises so large a propor- 
tion of individuals able and willing to discharge their duties.” 

His health for many years had been far from good ; he had long been subject to internal disease ; but 
during his residence in Bengal it had rather improved than otherwise. On his journey, however, a 
change took place, and after his return, the progress of decay became most rapid and alarming. As 
-soon as it was discovered to be of a fatal tendency, a voyage to Penang, and eventually to New South 
Wales, was determined on, in the hope that his valuable life might yet be prolonged ; but, “ He in 
•whose hands our life is,” was pleased, in one short week, to bring all such expectations to an end. On 
i'Wednesday June 29th, a manifest change for the worse came on. He became sensible of his decay, 
‘but was not entirely confined to his room more than two days. Of him, it may justly be said, “ Mark 
Sthe perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace.” As the hand of death 
cbecame heavy upon him, no change of manner, no perturbation of mind, nor alteration even of voice, 
except a little more of solemnity, was observable. He was attended with the utmost assiduity and 
•kindness by his medical friends. The Archdeacon had from the departure of his domestic Chaplain, 
resided in the house, and to him, the dying Prelate communicated freely on those subjects which occupied 
his mind. They were altogether such as might be expected from his previous character. The state and 
prospects of religion in India, the circumstances of some of his clergy, his own views of Divine truth 
in the prospect of eternity and the strong support they now afforded him. With such thoughts and 
occasional religious exercises, he met the last enemy as one who had long been expecting his attack, 
rnnd without the smallest sign of reluctance, yielded himself to the sentence incurred by man’s original 
transgression. The following is an extract of the character of this invaluable person, copied from a 

• sermon preached in the Cathedral by the Archdeacon on the Sunday after the Bishop’s death, with which 
this imperfect sketch may be brought to a close. “ We have left us in the character of our departed 
Bishop, an example of one who sought glory, honour, and immortality, by patient continuance in well 
doing. He began where the scriptures teach us to begin with personal religion. He had low thoughts 
of himself. He was seriously affected with a sense of his frailties and unworthiness, and rested his hope 
of salvation only on the mercy of God in Jesus Christ. He had attained in a remarkable degree a spirit 
of self-control, so that he was, to a considerable extent, a copy of the great Shepherd and Bishop of our 

•Souls, whose word is ‘ learn of me for I am meek and lowly.’ He took Revelation for his guide, and 
whilst the Triune God of the Bible was the object of his adoration, the will of God was the rule of his 
practice.” 

“ 1 have a growing evidence ,” said he, after partaking of the Lord’s supper on the 3d of July, “ that 
I know in whom I have trusted,” and he went on to contrast the uncertainties attending the pursuit 
of science, with the increasing confidence which the Christian feels in Divine Truth as he advances in the 
- knowledge of it. 

“In his peculiar office he came near to the apostolical standard in the Epistles of Timothy and Titus. 
Of his learning, and capacity for perpetuating an order of ministers in the Church, it would require 
one of a similar measure of learning and piety to speak, but all could judge, that as a Bishop he was 
blameless and free from reproach ; moderate in all his habits and pursuits, disinterested in a high degree, 

• and free from all suspicion of the love of money. That he was apt to teach, and a true labourer in the 

• word and doctrine; sober in judgment, wise to solve difficulties; of a compassionate spirit, and heartily 
desirous of men’s eternal good. In the public exercise of his office, he must unavoidably, whilst human 

mature is what it is, have given offence to some. The lively sense he had of his own responsibility 
rendered him more keenly alive to such defects in any of those under his authority as might hinder their 
[usefulness, or do injury to the cause they had solemnly pledged themselves to serve. He felt himself 
therefore bound, when occasion arose, to reprove and to rebuke with all authority. 

“To the patient continuer in well-doing a sense of God’s forgiving mercy, takes even in this life the 
[ sting from death, and an assured hope of eternal life, glides and illumines the dark passage of the valley 
ot the shadow of death. This our departed Prelate experienced : the persuasion that God would carry 
on his own work on the earth, and that he could and would abundantly supply the means of so doing, 

• left him without a care for this world, an assured hope that on being released from the body, he should 
be with Christ, strengthened him to endure protracted and intense bodily suffering, with patience and 

d 2 


20 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


fortitude, not to be surpassed, till at length, being released from this strife of nature, be entered on the 
eternal life to which he had long aspired. 

To the above we will only add the last words the Bishop uttered, which to those who had the privilege 
of hearing them, were most affecting, and which no one with the heart of a Christian, can, we are sure, 
reflect upon with indifference. After prayer had been engaged in, out of the visitation of the sick, 
ending with the Lord’s prayer, to which he added a fervent “ Amen,” a short pause ensued ; it was 
suddenly interrupted by his breaking out, in the most solemn and impressive manner, as follows : “ Oh 
Thou God of all grace, stablish, strengthen, settle us.” “ Have mercy upon all, that they may come to 
the knowledge of the Truth, and be saved.” “ There is none other name given among men by which 
they can be saved.” “ Other foundation can no man lay” — and he spoke no more. 

His remains were entombed in St. John’s Cathedral yard by the side of the late Chief Justice Blosset. 

The following lines are inscribed on a white marble Tablet , placed in St. John's Church wall. 

Sacred to the memory of 

The Right Revel. John Mathias Turner, D.D. 

Lord Bishop of Calcutta, 

He died July 7th, 1831 , Aged 45 Years. 

A Scholar, a Philanthropist, a man of God. 

The righteous, and the wise, and their works, are in the hand of God. 


THE RIGHT REVEREND DANIEL CORRIE— (First Bishop of Madras .) 

This amiable and pious man, who by the force of steady and most conscientious fulfilment of his sacred 
duties, rather than by any extraordinary talents or extensive acquirements, raised himself to high office, 
has left behind him a name, the memory of which India, at least, will not willingly let die. But it is not 
as Bishop Corrie of Madras that the subject of this memoir is endeared to the troops of friends who still 
mourn his loss ; nor under that title that his name became familiar to the whole religious world. It is 
not as Bishop Corrie of Madras that we love to think of him ; but as Archdeacon Corrie of Calcutta. 

Daniel Corrie was born in April 1777 ; his father was a country clergyman ; and Daniel himself would 
have moved in the same sphere but for the offer of a Chaplaincy on the East India Company’s establish- 
ment which was made to him soon after ordination. His childhood and boyhood appear to have 
presented no very remarkable indications of religious warmth or intellectual promise. Having been 
educated at home, up to the age of seventeen, he was then removed to the house of a friend in London, 
“who had expressed an intention of providing in life for him.” Four years afterwards he returned 
home, the temptations of a London life having, it would appear, proved too strong for his unguarded 
youth ; and then, as his heart slowly but certainly began to yield itself to religious impressions, his 
thoughts turned towards the ministry as a profession, and in the summer of 1799 he was “ entered of 
Clare Hall, Cambridge.” His good resolutions, however, were soon shaken. The seductive and perni- 
cious environments of College life seem to have been even more fatal to him than the attractions of the 
great metropolis. He spent his first year at the University “ in a round of dissipation.” But that 
truly apostolic man, Mr. Simeon, was then ministering at Trinity Church. Young Corrie listened with 
attention, and not without profit. He became a regular attendant at the place of worship, and from this 
time his reformation advanced ; not however without some intervals of painful self-conflict and occasional 
deviations, which sorely distressed him. In 1802 he was ordained ; and entered the Ministry with a due 
sense of the responsibility of the undertaking. 

Having been appointed Curate of Stoke Rochfort, he continued to reside in that Parish until the 
Easter of 1804, when he returned to Cambridge for the purpose of keeping his Law Exercises. It was 
on this occasion that he cemented a friendship with Henry Martyn, which continued undiminished up to 
the day of the latter’s death. Similar in some respects, — yet in others how dissimilar ! — was the career 
of these two young men. They started about the same time on the great journey of life ; both had 
slipped and fallen often at the outset ; they met at Cambridge, listened together to the ministerings of 
Simeon; from his lips received wisdom, and so receiving it, derived grace from above; both turned 
their thoughts towards the East — perhaps they had communed together at Cambridge relative to this 
great field of Apostolic labour ; both obtained Chaplaincies on the East India Establishment, and entered 
their new profession with the same missionary aspirations and resolutions, thinking less of the especial 
functions of their new office than of the wants of the whole heathen world. By both the Chaplaincy was 
regarded, in the first instance, as little more than a means to an end. 

In the autumn of 1805 Martyn sailed for Calcutta ; and at the commencement of the following year, 
Corrie in his turn, embarked. His destination was the same. They arrived in India within a few 
months of each other, and were received beneath the same roof — the hospitable roof of Mr. Brown, 
another chaplain on the establishment. There is, on the banks of the river Hooghly, at Aldeen* an old 
Hindoo Pagoda, now a picturesque ruin overrun with weeds and creepers. In this once popular 
idol-temple, some forty years ago Brown, Martyn and Corrie often met for prayer and “ sweet 
counsel.” The former had fitted it up as a study and chapel, and there the two young chaplains 
spent a great part of their time. There also, in the infancy of Indian Missions, Martyn, Corrie and 
Brown often met Carey, Marshman and Ward, and with a mutual forgetfulness of all sectarian 
distinctions, mingled their councils for the advancement of Christ’s kingdom in this benighted land. 
There is a melancholy satisfaction in recurring to the friendly meetings which were often held at the 
Pagoda of Aldeen by these early labourers, and this feeling is more strongly excited, when it is painfully 
remembered that not one of this faithful band now survives. “ They rest from their labours and their 
works do follow them.” 

But to return to the subject of our memoir : — The two friends, Martyn and Corrie started within a few 
weeks of each other on their respective journeys into the interior. For some time the life of the one, 
but little differed from the life of the other. Both were engaged at different Indian stations in the 

* Aldeen is on the eastern extremity of Serampore, 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


2 ! 


performance of their professional duties, occasionally turning aside, when opportunity offered, to argue 
with, or preach to the natives of the country ; and to this end, intently studying the native languages and 
busying themselves in the good work of scripture translation. The two friends kept up a close corres- 
pondence, detailing, each to each, their professional labours, and commenting upon the impediments and 
obstructions which beset their path — the apathy, and worse than apathy, of Christians, and the heinous 
abominations of the heathen. Painful as it was to these good men to write such letters, they are now, 
after a lapse of forty years, to be read with no ordinary pleasure. The English in India are not now 
what they were, when Martyn groaned in spirit at the infidelity which scoffed at his ministerings, which 
he encountered with all the fortitude of a Christian hero, and when the less earnest soul of Corrie 




shrunk alarmed at the thought of flinging himself, Gospel-armed, upon the spears of the scorners. 
There are men now in Calcutta, who sit in the old Mission Church, and remember the days when 
Martyn and Corrie preached, in that same Chapel, almost to empty pews. 

But the paths of these two good men soon diverged into widely different regions. They met, for the 
last time, at Cawnpore in 1810. Martyn went, in the fulness of his Apostolic zeal, to visit strange 
lands, and find, after long and untold sufferings endured with the courage of a hero, and the patience 
of a saint, an early and unhonored grave. Corrie, along a more pleasant path, and yet not without 
his trials, went straightway to a Bishopric, surviving his friend a quarter of a century, and dying at 
his post ripe alike in time and honour. 

A year after the death of Martyn, (Mr. Brown was carried off about the same time,) the first Indian 
Bishop was appointed. The selection had fallen on Dr. Middleton — an accomplished scholar. Corrie, 
who had united himself in the autumn of 1812 to the daughter of a Mr. Myers, was at Calcutta when 
the Bishop arrived ; the state of his health, from his unremitting exertions in the ministry at Agra, had 
injuriously affected his constitution, brought him down to the Presidency, and now compelled him to 
take a voyage to England. He embarked in January 1815, and reached home in due course. “ I well 
remember,” said Bishop Wilson, more than 20 years afterwards, “ the affection with which he was every 
where welcomed.” At the close of August 1817, he was again in Calcutta. He was then appointed 
to the ministerial charge of the Benares Station, — a scene, as he describes it, of delightful labour ; from 
this place he was removed, in December 1818, to the more important cantonment of Cawnpore. But 
before he could join his appointment at the latter place, he was called to assume one of the Presidency 
Chaplaincies, and, in accordance with this official arrangement, he repaired to Calcutta. Soon afterwards, 
the Senior Presidency Chaplaincy became vacant ; Corrie, in due course, succeeded to it. His duties 
here were multifarious. His labours heavy. He was not one to rest satisfied with mere official performances. 
His self-incurred obligations were as onerous as those which arose out of his recognized profession. 

In the hot weather of 1822, Bishop Middleton died ; Corrie attended his death-bed. Two months 
afterwards, the Archdeacon of Calcutta fell a victim to the cholera, and Corrie was appointed an 
Ecclesiastical Commissioner in conjunction with Mr. Parsons, who had been his fellow-passenger on his 
first voyage to India. Bishop Heber reached Calcutta in October 1823, and immediately appointed 
Corrie to the vacant Archdeaconry. It is, we have already said, as Archdeacon Corrie, that his name 
is best known both in the Eastern and Western world. 

In 1824, the Archdeacon accompanied Bishop Heber on the visitation tour, the details of which the 
Bishop’s delightful journal has rendered so familiar to English readers ; but owing to the delicate state 
of his health, he left the Episcopal party at Lucknow, and turned off to Cawnpore, thence proceeding in 
search of health to the Dhoon. The intended departure of the Bishop for Madras and Bombay rendered 
it necessary that the Archdeacon should return to Calcutta. He accordingly repaired to the Presidency, 
which he reached in the cold weather of 1825. The Bishop departed, never to return, and the Archdea- 
con preached the funeral sermon of the deceased Prelate. The affairs of the Diocese now devolved 
upon him, and he took possession of the Bishop’s Palace. But there was no less of humility. In 
secret he recorded his fears that large means were a snare to him, and that the social requirements of 
high office, the necessity of enlarged hospitality and constant public appearance, distracted his mind 
from private devotion. For more than a year he continued to act as Commissary ; and when Dr. James, 
a man of a refined mind, an art-critic, and an author of some note, was appointed to the vacant See, 
he rejoiced in being thus relieved from the responsibility of the chief ecclesiastical control. But it was 
not long before he was again called upon to administer the affairs of the Diocese. The career of Bishop 
James was but a brief one. He rapidly sickened and died. And again the Archdeacon found himself 
at the head of the Anglo-Indian Church. 

At the close of 1829, Bishop Turner, an amiable and pious man, whose great merits have never been 
sufficiently acknowledged, arrived in Calcutta. But, like that of his predecessor, his career was a very 
brief one. In July 1831, the Indian Church was a fourth time deprived of its chief Pastor. The 
Archdeacon attended the death-bed of the Prelate ; and has minutely recorded the particulars of the last 
days of Bishop Turner, in a very interesting paper which is copied in the volume now before us. On 
Archdeacon Corrie once more devolved the painful duty of preaching the funeral sermon of a deceased 
Diocesan. There is no doubt that, at this time, Corrie would have been nominated for the vacant 
Bishopric ; but it was necessary that no time should be lost in filling up the appointment, and the 
Archdeacon must have proceeded to England for consecration. Accordingly Dr. Wilson, the present Me- 
tropolitan of India, who was then ministering in Islington, (a man of signal piety, great intelligence, and 
an energy of character, which neither age nor infirmity, nor the wasting climate of Bengal, have im- 
paired,) was consecrated fifth Bishop of Calcutta. But in 1834, the renewal of the Company’s charter, 
under which two new Sees were established, afforded an opportunity for the well-earned promotion of 
Archdeacon Corrie. His ministerial labours were now to find a fitting reward. At the close of 1834 he 
was nominated Bishop of Madras. In the cold weather of that year, he sailed for England, was con- 
secrated on the 14th of June, 1835, and almost immediately sailed again for the shores of India. He 
arrived at the end of October, and entered upon the duties of his new office with characteristic assiduity. 
About the middle of the following year, he made an extensive visitation tour of his Diocese ; and soon 


22 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCII. 


after his return to the Presidency, it pleased Providence to visit him with the severest affliction he 
had ever been called upon to sustain. On the last day of 1836, Mrs. Corrie breathed her last. But 
his bereavement was not of long continuance, for on the 5th of February 1837, he was united to her in 
a better world. Over-exertion of body and distress of mind had done their work upon him but too 
surely. When death came, it found him at his post. He was seized with his last rapidly fatal illness, 
when on his way to attend a meeting of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 

We cannot allow the record of this event to pass over without expressing our deep sense of Dr. 
Corrie’s Christian virtues. To know him, even in a remote degree, was to love him. It was impossible 
to come within the range of his influence without being impressed with the most affectionate esteem tor 
his character ; for he seemed to live in an atmosphere of benignity. His venerable figure would always 
have commanded respect, even if it had not been set off by that suavity of manner and cheerfulness of 
disposition which imparted so great a charm to his social intercourse. He never permitted the majesty 
of divine truth to be compromised for a moment by any deference for his fellow-men ; at the same tune 
he enforced the claims of religion with a degree of mildness, mixed with earnestness, which appeared to 
give them additional weight. His instructions acquired a tenfold efficacy from his own example, which 
afforded a pattern of the most genuine Christian simplicity. Free, to a great extent, from the infirmi- 
ties to which human nature is subject, he was ever ready to make allowances for the faults of others, 
while he reproved them with sincerity. If there was any drawback in his character, it appeared to 
arise from the predominance of the goodness of his heart over the firmness of his determination. He 
was not merely given to hospitality, but devoted to it. His liberality knew no bounds ; but his means, 
too frequently overstepped the bounds of prudence and obliged him to submit to privations of which 
his own benevolence was the cause. He acted but as the almoner of his income, which he appeared to 
consider, like every other possession, as a trust for the benefit of others. In this trait of his character, 
he was the exact counterpart of Brown and Thomason, who were remarkable for giving away every 
thing, and giving it cheerfully. Though Dr. Corrie was not calculated, from the feebleness of his 
voice, and a nervous tremour, to shine as a public speaker, his private ministrations in society, and in 
his own circle, made ample amends for the absence of pulpit eloquence. From his first arrival in the 
country, he considered himself a debtor to the heathen, among whom he laboured, as opportunity offered, 
with zeal and success. To the diffusion of divine truth and of Christian principle he devoted all the powers 
of his soul, and there was no Institution for the promotion of these objects, which did not receive his 
cordial support. Rarely has such a combination of Christian excellence been presented to public admira- 
tion. All that remains to us of it now is the example which he has left behind, and which, if rightly 
improved, will serve to animate and encourage those whom he can no longer instruct with his lips. 

The following Tablet was erected by a public subscription of his friends and placed in St. John’s 
Cathedral, and another in the Old Church. 

This Tribute of affection, is raised by the Christian community of this Presidency, 

To the memory of 

The Right Revd. Daniel Corrie, L.L.I). 

Late Lord Bishop of Madras, and formerly Archdeacon of Calcutta ; 

The friend and fellow-labourer of Henry Martyn, 

The beloved Prelate, 

died at Madras on the 5th day of February 1837, 

In the 59th year of his age, and the second of his Episcopate. 

“ They rest from their labours and their works do follow them.” 


The following inscriptions are copied from Tablets placed within St. John’s Cathedral : — 

Sacred to the memory of the late 

Michael Cheese, Esquire, 

Surgeon on the Honorable Company’s Bengal Establishment, 
and Garrison Surgeon of Fort William ; 

Dedicated by public contribution, 
in token of the high and well merited esteem of this community 
for the enlarged and practical philanthropy of that gentleman’s character. 

Perhaps never had the remains of a Christian in India been followed 
to their tomb with more heartfelt and expressed regret than 
was manifested by the numerous assemblage of all classes of the society of this place, 
who attended his funeral on the 15th of January 1816. 

He had exercised his professional talent with an ability 
which did honour to him as a practitioner of medicine, 
and with ajnunificence worthy of the religion he professed. 

If a change of air or expensive nutriments were desireahle, 
but could not be afforded from the resources of a patient, 

Mr. Cheese supplied the means, and when all human endeavours proved unavailing, 

His purse was ever open to clothe and support the destitute mourners ; 

That he was ever a welcome guest alike to the children and to the heads of the family. 


This Monument is erected to the memory of 
Sir Benjamin £leatli Malkin, Knight, 

One of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Judicature ; 

A man eminently distinguished by his literary and scientific attainments. 

By his professional learning and ability, 

By the clearness and accuracy of his intellect, 

By deligence, by patience, by firmness, by love of truth. 

By public spirit, ardent and disinterested, yet always under the guidance of discretion ; 
By riged uprightness, by unostentatious piety, 

By the serenity of his temper and by the benevolence of his heart. 

He was born on the 29th of September 1797, he died on the 21st of October 1837. 


— ■ . _ '■ . 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


23 


DR. WILLIAM TWINING. 

The subject of this memoir was born in Wales, where his father was a Clergyman, but in what part 
•of the Principality is uncertain. The first event of Mr. Twining’s life about which any precise informa- 
ftion can be gained, is that, in 1808, he was a student of Guy’s Hospital, being then about 18 years of 
age. Sir A. Cooper, Messrs. Forster and Lucas, were the Surgeons of the Hospital ; and Sir Astly 
and Mr. Clive were the principal lecturers. Here Mr. Twining distinguished himself by the same deli- 
•gence and application which he ever afterwards displayed through life ; and so much interested was he 
fin the pursuit of anatomy, that, instead of availing himself of the summer recesses, in the Medical 
.Schools in London, to leave town and enjoy himself in the country, (the plan usually adopted even by 
•very industrious young men,) he entered himself as a pupil to that celebrated anatomist, the late Mr. 
Joshua Brookes, whose class remained open during the summer months. He there laboured with 
•unwearied industry, and with so much success, that his instructor, (delighted with his zeal and acquire- 
iments) employed him as an assistant in his own private dissections, and afterwards made him his de- 
imonstrator, an office of great honor for so young a man. Had Mr. Twining remained in that situation 
•land devoted himself thenceforth to the employment of lecturing, there is no doubt that he would ulti- 
nnately have stood in the highest rank as an anatomical teacher ; and where could a member of the 
^Medical profession wish to be more proudly placed ? But he was destined to shine in another sphere, 
and in a distant clime. He remained only two years with Mr. Brookes, and then, lured by the prospect 
of instruction which the brilliant campaigns in the Peninsula offered to all young Surgeons, and perhaps 
■also tempted by a natural desire of seeing the world under such advantageous circumstances, he entered 
the army, (Medical Department) and in 1810 joined as Hospital Assistant to the British Troops in 
IPortugal under Lord Wellington. In this capacity he served with the army during the whole course 
■of the war, and was present at most of those glorious battles which contributed so pre-eminently to 
i raise the British name. 

In March 1814, he was promoted to the rank of Staff Assistant Surgeon, and placed on the Staff 
of General Lord Hill, in which capacity he entered Paris with the allied army. In 1815, he had the good 
ffortune to witness the ever memorable conflict and crowning victory of Waterloo. 

After the termination of the war, he remained in Lord Hill’s family, till his marriage, which took 
rplace in 1817. He was then stationed with a Regiment at Portsmouth. In 1819, he was employed in 
tthe Hospital at Chatham ; and, for a short time, was Staff Assistant Surgeon at the Cavalry Depot at 
Maidstone. But after the turmoil and perpetual excitement in which he had been engaged for so many 
•years, the inactivity of a garrison life was by no means congenial to his feelings. To obtain an employ- 
■ment more suited to his taste, he volunteered for foreign service. He was accordingly ordered to the 
West Indies ; to this order he declined, stating his wish to be sent to the East, and claiming priority of 
choice on account of his previous services ; at the time, however, he was disappointed ; but shortly after- 
wards he was asked by Sir Edward Paget, to join him in Ceylon as his personal Surgeon, an office of 
which he gladly availed himself, and in 1821, he sailed accordingly for that colony. 

In 1823, when Sir Edward, after having been appointed to the command of the Indian army, arrived in 
Bengal, he was accompanied by his Surgeon, and travelled with him to the Upper Provinces in his first tour 
of inspection. Calcutta at that time presented an inviting prospect for an aspiring member of the profession. 
Mr. Twining, influenced by that circumstance, and thinking, moreover, that it was, at length, time to quit 
his wandering career of life, resolved to leave His Majesty’s service and enter that of the Honorable Com- 
pany, in the attainment of which object he was kindly assisted by the Commander-in-Chief. In 1824, 
Sir Edward Paget obtained for him the appointment of Assistant Surgeon on the Bengal Establishment. 
He still retained his commission in the King’s service and held it till 1830, when he was compelled, by 
the Home Authorities, to relinquish it, or resume his duties with a British Regiment. The latter alter- 
native he was not likely to choose, considering the advantageous position in which he then stood, as a 
successful practitioner in Calcutta, and on the 7th December 1830, he accepted the regulated commuted 
allowance of officers of his rank, and quitted the British army. 

He remained on Sir Edward’s Staff for a short time, and was then placed in the General Hospital as 
senior permanent Assistant, a situation he held until the time of his death. From this period may 
be dated the commencement of the brilliant, though unhappily brief, professional career which has ren- 
dered Mr. Twining so conspicuous in life, and so much regretted in death. 

Mr. Twining was not long in the General Hospital ere the public began to discover his worth and to value 
his services proportionately. He soon became extensively engaged in private practice. People of all ranks 
and religions, Europeans and Natives, flocked to him ; and perhaps no man was ever better fitted to 
succeed in this department of his profession. His profound knowledge of disease, in every form under 
which it could be presented to him, together with the natural firmness of his character, gave a marked 
decision and promptitude to his manner, which at once inspired the sick with confidence and hope. 
The extent of his practice had latterly become so great, and his exertions so severe, as visibly to impair 
i his health ; though, unshaken in fortitude, he never permitted illness to serve him as an excuse for 
idleness, and he used to boast that he had not been absent from his duty for a single day, since he had 
been in Calcutta. Besides the extensive nature of his general practice in Calcutta, his public duties 
were by no means light. In addition to his appointment in the Hospital, he was Surgeon to the Cal- 
cutta Jail and the Upper Orphan School, and was unremitting in the discharge of the duties attached to 
• those vocations. He attended the General Hospital at all hours of the day and night, and much of his 
valuable observations upon disease were drawn from the close attention which he paid to the cases under 
his charge in that Institution. 

The history of Mr. Twining’s connection with the Medical Society is a subject which calls forth our 
admiration, mixed with a long train of melancholy reflections ; for it is impossible to look back with- 
out approbation upon the unceasing interest which he took in its welfare. Mr. Twining was amongst the 
earliest members of the Society, and from the beginning contributed with all his energy to promote its 


24 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


success. He was not, however, content with his own exertions in its favor. He induced all around 
him to labour in its behalf, and upon the death of the lamented Dr. John Adam, in 1830, he was 
chosen to fill the office of Secretary, a situation which he occupied with a degree of unremitting zeal 
and attention almost without a parallel in the records of any other scientific body. But towards the 
end of 1834, he was, though most reluctantly, compelled to resign his office into the hands of Mr. 
Bramley ; for the extent of his other occupations, so absorbed his time, that he found himself unable 
to continue the duties of that department. He nevertheless relaxed not in his strenuous exertions in 
the Society’s behalf. 

In the course of the last ten years, Mr. Twining furnished the Society with a great number of papers 
upon various subjects ; upwards of twenty of these have been published. Their publication was, how- 
ever, but the prelude to a work on afar more extensive scale, in the preparation of which Mr. Twining 
was for some time engaged. In August 1832, his admirable book upon the diseases of Bengal was 
announced. The reputation which the author had previously attained, and the high respect already felt 
for his opinions, by his professional brethren throughout India, excited intense expectation on the 
merits of the forthcoming treatise ; its appearance was hailed with eagerness and delight ; nor was the pub- 
lic disappointed ; for it contained all that was looked for, and was unanimously declared to be the most 
important work upon Indian diseases ever promulgated. 

In 1833, he published, through his Booksellers in England, a separate work upon cholera, which was 
favorably received by the British public. Mr. Twining’s fame and reputation were much increased 
throughout all India, and extended themselves even to Europe, by the production of his work “On 
the Diseases of Bengal.” So impressed were the members of the Supreme Government with its im- 
portance, that, with great liberality, they contributed fifteen hundred rupees towards the expense of its 
printing and publication. The first edition sold rapidly, and the author was soon forced to make pre- 
parations for bringing out a second, with many additional observations, and new chapters, which very 
much increased the value and usefulness of the work ; in June 1835 it was published, and most warmly 
received by the public. The Government again came forward upon this occasion, and in a very hand- 
some manner, marked their sense of the value of the author’s labours by taking 200 copies of the 
work, with the intention of distributing them throughout the Medical Service. 

With the publication of this edition of his work, Mr. Twining’s brilliant career was about to close. 

On the 19th August, as Mr. Twining was visiting his patients, his coachman drove against a buggy 
and overturned it ; a gentleman who was in it, was thrown violently on the ground, and his thigh was 
fractured ; Mr. Twining instantly ran to assist the wounded man, and with the aid of a passenger, 
lifted him into a palanquin. In doing this, he felt something give way in his chest with a sudden 
snap, and instantly became sick and faint. Throughout the whole of his subsequent illness, he was per- 
fectly calm and self-possessed ; reasoning on his case with clearness and judgment. During the first 
two days he took an unfavorable view of its termination, but the only thing which appeared to distress 
him, was the remembrance of his wife and child ; of them he could never speak, without the deepest 
emotion. 

The history of the case however, appears to point out the rupture of a large blood vessel, conse- 
quent upon a severe affection of the heart. He had for some time previous to his death labored under 
symptoms which marked the existence of a disorder in that organ ; and he himself frequently expressed 
his conviction that such was the fact. 

Mr. Twining was of a middling stature, but his figure was remarkably strong and robust ; his coun- 
tenance was intelligent and thoughtful, but very mild, and there was a general expression of benevolence 
diffused over it which was extremely prepossessing. In manners, he w T as very retiring and quiet, almost 
resembling a member of the Society of Friends, in his appearance and deportment, exhibiting, at the 
same time, a great share of the kindness and warmth of heart, which he naturally possessed. He 
was at all times singularly temperate and abstemious in his habits ; a rigid water-drinker, in example 
as well as precept ; he regarded indulgences of the table of every kind, as unpardonable offences in a 
man, who wished to preserve his health, and more especially with reference to hot climates. Mr. 
Tvvining’s whole character was marked by a large proportion of that benevolence which was stamped 
upon his countenance, and it was nowhere more conspicuous than in the unwearied kindness and 
attention with which he regarded the sick of all ranks and descriptions who were placed under his care. 
In domestic life, he was most affectionate : indeed it formed for him the greatest attraction of social 
existence. 

As a writer, Mr. Twining was clear, forcible, and unpretending. His observations were well 
arranged, his mode of reasoning fair and very accurate. His style of composition was plain and con- 
cise, without any attempt at ornament or fine writing ; but far from being clumsy, dull, or con- 
strained. 

The mournful impression caused by Mr. Twining’s decease was universal. He was so well known, 
so much beloved by many — and so highly valued by all, that the death of no one individual in the 
country could have created more profound grief, or produced a greater sensation of public sympathy. 
His remains were interred in the South Park Street Burial Ground, and the Inscription which marks 
his grave will be found amongst those in that Ground. A large sum of money was subscribed by his 
patients and friends for the purpose of erecting a Monument to his memory in St. John’s Church, 
(of which the following is the copied Inscription) : 

In grateful recognition 

of benefits derived from the successful application of professional ability, 
and in testimony of respect and esteem for modest worth and active philanthropy, 

This Tablet, erected by his friends and patients, is consecrated to the memory of’ 

William Twining-, 

C.R. C.L.S. 

Obiit Augt. 25th, 1835, Aged 45. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


25 


The following Inscription is copied from a handsome white Marble Monument placed close to the 
S. E. entrance of St. John's Church. 

This Monument is erected 
by Sir David Ochterlony, and the officers of 
the army under his command, 
to the memory of 
Lieutenant Peter Bawtie, 
of the Corps of Engineers in the army of Bengal ; 
who, at the age of twenty-three, at the close ot the first Campaign ot the Napaul War ; 

to the successful termination of which his exertions had eminently contributed : 
Fell a victim to his devotion in the service of his country. 

Beloved, respected, and admired. 

Obiit. Anno. MDCCCXV. 


On the North of the Church altar are the two following Inscriptions : — 

To the Memory of 

Trevor John Chicheley Plowden, 

An affectionate husband and father, 

An upright public servant, and virtuous citizen ; 
who for thirty years worshipped God in this Church. 

This simple memorial of love and respect, 
is erected by his wife and children. 

Born on the 4th of June, 1784, died 7th July 1836. 

“Thou has turned my heaviness into joy: Thou hast put off my sackcloth and girded me with glad* 

ness.” — Ps. xxx. 12 v. 


To the Memory of 

Sir Charles William Blunt, Baronet, 
who departed this life at Pultah, on the 29th day of September 1892, 

In the seventy-second year of his age. 

The following is copied from a handsome White Marble Monument, in the N. E . entrance of St. 
John’s Church : 

To the Memory of 

Alexander Colvin. 

This tablet is erected by the Merchants of Calcutta ; 
who having for forty years witnessed in him an union of those talents and virtues, 
which best adorn their profession, 

And do most honor to a character in private life, 

Thus record their affectionate esteem for him whilst living, and their sorrow for las death. 

Born 111 rd April, A.D. MDCCLVI. 

Died X Vth December, A. D. MDCCCXVlil. 


THE HONORABLE JOHN ADAM — ( late Governor General of India). 

John Adam was the eldest son of the Right Honorable William Adam, Lord Chief Commissioner 
of the Jury Court for Civil Causes in Scotland, and the Honorable Eleanor Elphinstone, second 
daughter of Charles, tenth Lord Elphinstone, and was horn on the 4th May 1779. lie was educated 
on the foundation of the Charter House, and being presented by his uncle with a Civil appointment to 
Bengal in 1794, was sent, for a year, to Edinburgh, where he attended the lectures of Dugald Stewart, 
Professor Robison and other distinguished literary instructors of that period. Mr. Adam finally sailed 
for India in the ‘ Barrington,’ along with his cousin, the Hon. Mountstuart Elphinstone (afterwards 
Governor of Bombay) and arrived at Calcutta in February 1796. His first nomination was in the 
judicial branch of the service, and lie was sent, to Patna to serve his probationary term under Mr. 
Henry Douglas, then Judge and Magistrate of that station. Here he, remained for three years, employed 
in the study of the languages of the country, and in the sedulous discharge of those minor duties by 
which the junior servants of the Company are trained to official habits, and fitted for the high career 
to which they are destined. In March 1799, Mr. Adam was promoted to the office of Register in the 
Twenty-four Purgunnahs, in the Presidency district ; and having been introduced to the personal notice 
of the Governor General, he was, in the following year, transferred to the judicial and revenue branch 
of the Secretariat, wherein he was nominated head assistant. 

Marquis Wellesly had recently returned to Bengal upon the conclusion of the Mysore war, and was, 
at this time, occupied with the formation of a Council to the College of Fort William ; Mr. Adam was 
one of the very first selected for this distinguished position. In May 1802, he was placed at the head 
of the office in question, and vested with the charge of its records ; and in March of the following year 
his services were rewarded by a nomination to the office of Collector in one of the districts (Goruckpore) 
then recently ceded by the Nawaub Vizier. It was not, however, Lord Wellesly’s intention to deprive 
himself of the useful talents of his assistant ; he accordingly retained Mr. Adam in liis suite until his 
final departure for Europe ; and Sir George Barlow, having, in April 1801, made him Deputy Secretary in 
the Serect, Political and Foreign Departments, took occasion to record a minute explanatory of the cause 
of his not joining the statioyi to which he had been appointed, bearing therein a most honorable testimony 
to the useful services rendered by Mr. Adam in the Secretariat, more especially during the course of 
the Marhatta war. 

In March 1809 Mr. Adam was appointed, by Lord Minto, Secretary to Government in the Military 
Department, an office which required the qualifications of a thorough man of business, and which he 

possessed in a pre-eminent degree. Occupied sometimes with the discussion of projects affecting the 
most momentous interests of the State, he possessed on the one hand that intelligence of mind which 

K 


26 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


discriminates between the sound and the fallacious ; whilst, on the other, he could devote himself 
with the most exemplary diligence, and without any sensation of fatigue or disgust, to the dullest 
accumulation of uninteresting details. The records of the Supreme Government contain more than one 
acknowledgment of the admirable manner in which the duties of this office were performed by Mr. 
Adam. 

Upon Mr. Edmonstone’s promotion to a seat in the Supreme Council in October 1812, Mr. Adam 
succeeded him in the more responsible and higher office of Secretary to Government in the Secret, 
Foreign and Political Departments, and it was in this situation that Lord Hastings found him on his 
arrival in India in the following year. In this situation it became the duty of Mr. Adam to point out 
to the new Governor-General the political objects most deserving of his attention ; to ascertain his 
views, and assist in their development, besides that of finally becoming the organ for communicating 
them to others. Mr. Adam, accompanied the Governor General, as Secretary, throughout the opera- 
tions now about to commence, and, so far as his voice had weight, influenced the resolution finally 
taken by his Lordship, to adopt, upon his sole responsibility, an extensive plan for establishing British 
supremacy over the whole of India. Mr. Adam was the sole depository of his Lordship’s views, and 
exclusively enjoyed his confidence ; so much so, that the instructions for the movement of every corps, 
sometimes extending even to the details of its formation and equipment, issued entirely under his sig- 
nature. The labour and anxieties of that period can be known only to those who witnessed Mr. Adam 
under the discharge of his accumulated duties ; late in the night, when all were at rest, the lamp was 
constantly burning in his tent, while kasids and estafettas were waiting to carry forth his expresses ; 
again, though the march was always made before daybreak in the morning, he was nevertheless 
beforehand, and at the desk with his candles, to snatch a few minutes for some urgent business ere the 
drum should beat the final order for a move. It is to be observed that, in addition to the functions 
of the Political and Secret Departments, Mr. Adam filled the situation of Private Secretary to the 
Governor-General ; so that he had another branch of duty to perform, in its nature urgent and distinct 
from that which maiqjy occupied his thoughts ; but consisting of confidential correspondence, regarding 
the distribution of patronage, or of communications with the principal functionaries at the Presidency, 
and therefore not admitting of transfer or delegation to other hands. The strongest frame of body must 
have yielded to the fatigue and anxiety of such accumulated labours, continued, as they were, for 
so long a period without intermission, Mr. Adam’s constitution was originally extremely good ; a 
long career, however, of sedentary and incessant occupation in the climate of India had already so far 
weakened it as to have rendered a voyage to the Cape indispensible a few years before. His frame, there- 
fore, was not proof against the effect of such unremitting cares as were now heaped upon him, and the 
seeds were unfortunately sown, during the campaign, of the disease which ultimately carried him off, 
and deprived the world of his virtues and useful talents when they had scarcely ripened to full maturity. 
But we have not yet done with the recapitulation of Mr. Adam’s claims to the lasting gratitude of the 
country, to the service of which indeed, his life was devoted. Though the remainder of his days were 
short, and passed in sickness, the period was yet eventful, and crowded with actions for which his 
name will be long remembered and cherished with affection. 

In April 1817, the Court of Directors, in acknowledgment of Mr. Adam’s prior services, had nomi- 
nated him provisional Member of Council, and the departure of Mr. C. Ricketts for England enabled 
him to take his seat, very soon after the return of the Governor- General to the Presidency upon the 
conclusion of the Mahratta and Pindarry war, viz. on the 9th of January 1819. As a Member of Coun- 
cil, Mr. Adam’s character was conspicuous for solid sense, and for the close discriminating judgment 
he had ever at command for all questions. 

On the 13th of January 1823, Mr. Adam took charge of the Supreme Government. Elevated thus 
temporarily, and almost by accident, to the highest station ; placed in a situation of vast power, and con- 
scious of possessing the talent to wield it beneficially, he detennined to do all the good he could ; 
unwilling that the period of his sway should be marked as a mere interregnum, distinguished oidy for 
the absence of energetic measures, a pure blank space, as it were, between two administrations ; nor did 
he think it either generous or consistant with the line of public duty, to shift off upon his successors the 
odium, risk, and responsibility of executing what his own judgment pronounced to be right. 

There was no branch of public policy to which Mr. Adam attached more importance than the educa- 
tion of the people ; his attention was sedulously directed to the important subject of public instruction, 
in furtherance of which object public aid had been afforded to those useful and laudable institutions, 
the School Book .Society, the Calcutta School Society, and the Hindoo College, founded in 1817. 
Besides thus extending the support and countenance of Government to Institutions directed to the moral 
improvement of the country, Mr. Adam took the same occasion for setting apart a fund for public 
works, tending to the increase of the people’s comfort and convenience. For this purpose, the town 
duties collected at the principal cities and stations presented themselves as in every respect the most 
appropriate resource ; the total amount being such as Government could sacrifice without inconvenience, 
while the distribution was ready made, in the proportion levied from the population of each place. 

This however is not all. The administration of civil justice, which is the first duty of a regular 
Government ; indeed, the condition by which it acquires the title, was very inadequately provided for, 
from the insufficiency of the existing European Establishments. The above are some of the most promi- 
nent measures of Mr. Adam’s short administration of seven months. But matters were not yet 
brought to the issue to call for the practical application of these principles, when Lord Amherst arrived 
and assumed the Government. Mr. Adam was obliged, by the growing strength of the disease 
(a dysentery) which had been preying on his constitution for several years, to proceed to sea for his 
recovery ; lie thus had no part in the subsequent measures of the Government. 

He remained at this Presidency until the middle of September, for the purpose of introducing his 
successor, Lord Amherst, to a knowledge of the affairs requiring his most immediate care. His public 
life may be fairly stated to have closed with his government on the 1st of August 1823, for what 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


2 7 


remains to be told is only the melancholy tale of an increasing infirmity, for which he in vain sought 
relief — first in a voyage, by sea, to Bombay ; then in a land journey through Central India, during 
the bracing months of January and February ; and, finally, in a residence, for the hot season, in the 
mountains conquered from the Nipaulese. All was however, fruitless : the disease was too firmly rooted 
iu his constitution to yield to change of air, relaxation, or any other remedy that could be applied in 
India. Returning at the close of the ensuing rains, a consultation of medical men was Held at Ga- 
zeepoor, on the Ganges, who gave it as their decided opinion that there was no hope but in a voyage to 
Europe. Mr. A. then came down to Calcutta for the purpose of embarking, in a state of weakness that 
prevented his again taking his seat at the Council table, or even admitting the visits of His most intimate 
and dearest friends. A passage was engaged for him in the ‘ Albion,’ Captain Swainson, which finally 
sailed for Liverpool on the lfith April 1825 ; but the hand of death was upon him, and lie did not live 
to revisit the land of his fathers, or to gladden the hearts of his family who doted on him with an 
affection unknown to those who have not a son or brother who has wrought for himself the same 
high claims to love and veneration. Mr. Adam died off Madagascar on the 4th June, and when the 
vessel arrived without him, many, indeed, were the hearts in which a mournful blank was left by the 
intelligence. Public tokens of the high esteem and respect in which his character was held, and of the 
regret universally felt at the loss, have not been wanting to grace his memory, but this can afford little 
consolation to the many who enjoyed his friendship and who were attached to him by ties they can 
never transfer to another ; while to his family, whose affection had been for years feeding in absence 
on the report of his fame and virtues, and a fondly-cherished hope that he would be restored to their 
embraces and society in the maturity of his years and honors — all these additional testimonies of his 
value were but aggravations of the affliction with which that hope was to be abandoned for ever. 

In every relation of life Mr. Adam was amiable in a very rare degree ; and this was acknowledged, 
not only by those who, participating in his society and counsels, felt the influence of his character in the 
warmth of their own feelings ; but by those also who saw him at a greater distance, and were even 
opposed to him in political sentiment. A most gratifying proof of this was afforded on the occasion of 
his relinquishing the Government, and preparing for the voyage to Bombay, from which he then expected 
a partial, if not entire restoration to health. 

A full-length portrait of Mr. Adam is placed in the Town Hall ; the picture has been well executed 
by G. Chinnery, and is indeed a faithful memorial of features, which cannot be looked upon without 
reverence and affection ; for they carry in them the aspect of virtue united to high talent, and blended 
with a mild unassuming dignity of deportment, such as cannot fail to rivet the attention of a stranger 
even to Mr. Adam’s fame and merit. Mr. Adam’s public character has been best described by the 
relation of the principal circumstances of his public life, the attachment of his friends — of whom to the 
last day of his existence, the number was constantly increasing, without the loss of a single one of those 
previously gained, is the best test of his private virtues. There never was an individual in whom the 
qualities which form an estimable, useful, and distinguished man in public life, were more happily 
blended with those which engage the affections of mankind in private intercourse ; frank, sincere and 
open-hearted, his manners had a bewitching simplicity that banished restraint, and won their way to 
immediate esteem and confidence. He was blessed also with a cheerfulness of disposition and suavity 
of temper, which nothing could ruffle or interrupt : and, to crown the whole, his temperament was so 
truly social and his heart so thoroughly kind, and he returned the affections of others with so ready a 
warmth, that all who approached him found their early regard kindle rapidly into a sincere and lasting 
friendship. His charities were most extensive, and the real benevolence displayed, as well in the 
manner, as. in the liberality with which his assistance was afforded, might furnish a copious theme of 
eulogy ; for many are the traits of this description with which every one who has lived with him in 
India must be familiar. With such a disposition, it cannot be wondered at that his fortune, on leaving 
the country, should have been so small as barely to yield him a competency, though personally a man 
of no expensive habits and without family. Such, however, was the case, notwithstanding the very 
splendid career of service he had run; but Mr. Adam’s reward is in the reputation he has left behind 
him, and in the sentiment of gratitude and admiration with which his name will ever be inseparably 
liuked. 

To the memory of John Adam, eldest son of The Right Honorable William Adam, 

Lord Chief Commissioner of the Jury Court in Scotland. 

He arrived in Bengal, 1796, 

And passed through the highest offices in the Civil Service of the East India Company. 

Placed in the Supreme Council in 1819, he was again appointed 
to that station when the usual term of holding it had expired. 

From January to August 1823, he acted as Governor of India: 

Bad health compelled him to embark for England in March 1825, 
but he died on the 4th June, in the 47th year of his age, and his remains were committed to the ocean, 

His indefatigable zeal, and exemplary integrity ; the firmness of his conduct ; 
his elevated views, and the wisdom of his measures ; 
have been recorded by the Supreme Council of Bengal, 
and by those who preside over the affairs of India, in England. 

The modesty of his demeanor, his cultivated and 
intelligent conversation, the kindness of his nature and active benevolence 
will long be cherished in the hearts of those who dedicate this marble to his virtues. 


Next to which are the following Inscriptions : — 

This Cenotaph, 

raised by the hand of an affectionate uncle, bears record of the high talents and many virtues 
ol his nephew, Lieut. -Colonel John Weston, of the Bengal Military Establishment. 

He died deservedly lamented in the prime of life, on his voyage from Prince of Wales’ Island to Calcutta 

Anno Domini MDCCCX1X, 

e 2 


2d 


ST. JOHN’S CIIURCH. 


To I lie memory of Andrew Stirling', 

second son of Admiral Stirling, of Woburn (arm, in the County of Surry, 
m(io died at this Presidency on the 23rd of May, 1830, in the 36th year of his age. 

Mr. Stirling held the offices of Persian Secretary to Government, 
and Deputy Secretary in the Secret and Political Department. 

Throughout his career in life, he was not only eminently distinguished by great talents, 
but by urbanity of manners, and excellence of disposition. 

While his loss as a public servant will be felt by Government, 

His private virtues will be cherished by a numerous circle of acquaintance 
who loved him for his worth and admired him for his great acquirements. 

This Tablet is erected by his father, as a tribute of affection 
to the memory of a much beloved and much lamented son. 

(The following is an extract from one of the periodicals of the day , respecting the character and high 
attainments of the late Mr. Stirling .) 

“ Distinguished as Mr. Stirling- was by talents and acquirements of rare excellence ; possessing as 
he did in an especial degree, the qualities that tit for the most arduous duties of public life ; and marked 
as his career had been by an eminently beneficial and successful application of his powers to some of 
the most important and difficult exigencies of the public service, there is little doubt that, had it 
pleased Providence to prolong his life, he would eventually have attained still higher offices and honours 
than those which he held, with equal credit to himself, and advantage to the Government he so zealously 
and ably served. 

Familiar at once with the general principles that regulate Political affairs, and with the varied and 
intricate circumstances in this country to be weighed in the adjustment of Diplomatic relations ; he 
was at the same time thoroughly master of all the peculiar and conventional forms of Oriental regulation 
and intercourse ; and he added to these a patience, a temper, a tact, and peculiarly engaging urbanity 
of manner, which gave them the most successful effect. Nor was his usefulness confined to the depart- 
ment to which he more immediately belonged. In all branches of the Civil administration of the 
country, he had frequently had the opportunity of affording the Government and his colleagues the 
benefit of extensive knowledge, and of sound and comprehensive views. 

Mr. Stirling, (like most minds of a superior order) by an assiduous economy of time, satisfied the 
claims of business and routine, and found leisure to bestow time on the cultivation of general science, 
and elegant literature. Were it possible, in such a hasty notice as this, we could shew that, for the 
former particularly, he had a deep but an unostentatious enthusiasm. 

The death of such men in the prime of life must be severely felt, especially by that circle of which 
they were the ornaments. Of Mr. Stirling’s private virtues, however, it is not our purpose to speak in 
this place. They live in the cherished recollection of many among us who loved him for his w T orth, 
and admired him for his talents and acquirements. 

To the Junior members of the distinguished service to which he belonged, he has left the benefit of 
an example they would do well to imitate, — of conduct based upon the highest principles ; of a life of 
uniform, and great utility ; of unsullied rectitude ; dignified application and honorable fame.” 

He expired on the evening of the 23d May 1830, after ten days illness. 

His remains were placed in a leaden coffin and followed to the grave by a large concourse of mourn- 
ing friends, European and Native ; amongst the latter were observed almost the whole of the distinguished 
Native Princes, Nabobs, Rajahs and others. 


(The folloiving is taken from a large handsome Marble Monument, surmounted with Military arms 
and trophies, near the N. W. Staircase of St. John’s Church : — ) 

This Cenotaph was erected by the Neemutch Field Force, 
in honor of their commander, 

Lieut.-Colonel John Imdlow, C. B. 

This distinguished officer entered the Bengal Army on the 16th February 1795, 
and his career was marked by an ardent devotion to the duties of a soldier ; 
a generous enthusiasm and unabating zeal, which shed a lustre on the profession to which be belonged. 

By his heroic intrepidity in the arduous contest 
between the British troops and those of the Rajah of Napal, in the years 1814 and 1815, 
he obtained the unqualified approbation of the Supreme Government of India, 
and the Honors of the Bath from his Sovereign. 

His life fell a sacrifice to the energy of his spirit which led him into the field at the head of his division, 
whilst suffering under a painful and dangerous illness, under which he sunk, in Camp, at Barode, 
on the 22nd of September 1829, in the 44th year of his age. 

Just and inflexibly firm, yet temperate and mild in the exercise of his authority, 

He ensured the respect, whilst lie conciliated the attachment of the Troops under his command. 

The virtues that adorned his private life endeared him to his family and friends, 
by whom he was sincerely esteemed and beloved ; 
and who, whilst they unfeignedly mourn his loss, warmly cherish his remembrance. 


Next to the above is the following Tablet : — 


Sacred to the memory of 

Walter Nisbet, Esq. of the Bengal Civil Service; 
who, though dead, still liveth in the recollection of his sorrowing relatioiis, and of those 
numerous friends, whose attachment he conciliated, during twenty-three years’ residence in Calcutta, 

Obiit. October 11 Anno Dorn. 1833, yEtat Sum 43. 

“ Thanks be to God who giveth us the victory through Jesus Christ.” 

This Tablet is erected by his surviving brothers and sisters, 
as a joint tribute of their grateful affection, and in testimony of his acknowledged worth. 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


29 


On the left of the Western entrance : 

Sacred to the memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Hawtrcy, 
commanding' the 3rd Bengal Light Cavalry, 
died 7th of July 1033, aged 49 years. 

This Tablet is placed in St. John’s Church as a mark of respect and esteem by the officers ot his Corps. 


(The following Monuments of white marhle are to he seen on the Southern wing of St. John's 
Church .) 

In memory of 

George Cruttenden, 

late Major in the Honorable E. I. Company’s Bengal Army, 
whose long term of Military Service, fulfilled with every mark of good desert, 
was followed by an active part in civil life, pursued with equal talent and integrity. 

His Christian temper, and sound principles, 
his love for others, and his friendly dispositions, 
took their first course in the nearest circles of attachment, hut they knew no limit ; 
that he lived where his virtues found their just reward. 

This Monument, raised with emulous affection speaks for many. 

He died at Macao on the 23d of March 1822, Aged 54. 


By time’s sure test in varied stations schooled, 

God claimed the heart ; and that first tribute paid, 
Wide flowed the stream, one generous purpose ruled 
The soldier’s duties, and the toils of Trade. 

O, keep the record, keep it, friendly stone ! 

Nor yield it, but to register above ; 

Till heaven’s high Lord shall gather for his own 
The kind and true, the stewards of his love. 

Tell, faithful stone, for many a circling year. 

True to thy trust his worth and kindness tell : 

Bid those who tread these courts, and linger here, 
Bid them respect a name sustained so well. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

James Harwell, Esquire, 

Son of the late Richard Harwell, Esquire, of Transtead Park, Sussex. 

The best qualities of head and heart combined alike to distinguish his public and private life. 
Sub-Treasurer of this Presidency for 16 years, he discharged the duties of that responsible office 

with firmness, rectitude, and ability, equal to 
every emergency, whilst his modest unaffected worth 
conciliated the love and respect of all who knew him. 

“ Rich in good works” and patiently resigned to the Divine will, 

He expired after a long and painful illness, on the 16th of April 1833, aged 49 years. 


(The following is from a beautiful white Marhle Tablet placed in the South Gallery of St. John's 
Church ; — ) 

Consecrated to the Memory of 
Charles Lionel Showers, Esq. 

Senior Captain of the 19th Regiment Bengal Infantry, 
who in the assaults of the fortified heights of Malown, on tiie 
15th of April 1815, led one of the principal columns to a separate attack, in the most gallant style. 

And gloriously fell at its head just when in personal conflict 
he had with his own hand slain the chief of the enemy. 

In the various duties of life, as a man, soldier, and a Christian, 
the eminent qualities of the amiable and lamented Showers conspicuously shone. 

Firm in honor, sincere in friendship, ardent in his professional duties, 
and humble and fervent in those of a higher nature : 

The prominent features of his character were benevolence, zeal and piety, 
and his deserved portion, was the love, the esteem, and the respect of all who knew him. 

To record their deep sense of his worth, and their heartfelt concern for his loss ; 
the officers of the 19th Reg'iment have caused this monument to be 
erected in affectionate remembrance of their valued and regretted comrade. iEtat 35. 

On the same occasion, in the gallant execution of his duty. 

Fell Lieut. Humphrey Bagot, of the same Regt. TEtat 25. 

And in the same campaign, equally honorable, 

Fell Lieut. Edward "Wilson Broughton, 
of the same Regiment, ffEtat 26. 


(On the North Gallery , is the following Inscription: — ) 

Sacred to the memory of 
Captain R. A. McNaghten, 
late of the 61st Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, 
who departed this life 18th May 1845, aged 49 years. 

This tablet is erected by the officers of the Regiment as a slight tribute to departed worth. 


♦ 


30 


ST. JOHN’S CIIURCII. 


The following will he seen on the right and left of the Western entrance of St. John's Church 

Sacred to the Memory of George Palmer, Esquire. 

This tablet is erected to the memory of one of the best husbands, by his afflicted widow. 

No man possessed a more kind or benevolent heart. 

In manners plain, in council wise, in judgment upright, in piety and charity unostentatious ; 

In all the relations of husband, father and friend, exemplary and beloved. 

He departed this life at Purneah, September 10th, 1840, 
leaving, as the noblest monument to his memory and the richest legacy to his wife and children, 

the imperishable record of a good name. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” — Rev. xiv.13. 


Sacred to the memory of Captain and Brevet Major John Griffin, 
of the 24th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry, 
who fell in the action fought between the British Troops and Seikhs at Ferozeshah, 
on the 21st December 1845, aged 47 years. 

This tablet is erected by his brother officers, as a mark of their 
admiration of his character as a soldier and as a token of their affection for him as a friend. 


Sacred to the memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant Robert Harvey Turnbull, 
of the 24th Regt. Bengal Native Infantry, who was killed in action with the C hoars 
on the 1st of January 1833 ; zEtatis Sui 25. 

This Tablet is erected by his brother officers as an unaffected tribute to 
departed worth ; and in testimony of their sincere regard. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Colonel W. C. Faithful, 

who departed this life at. sea on the 16th of March 1838, aged 55. 
During the long period of 35 years of Military service in India, 
he was conspicuous for zeal and ability in the performance of his duties ; 
engaged often on active service in the field with honorable distinctions, 
and on two occasions severely wounded. 

This memorial is erected by his afflicted widow and children. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain John Martin, 41st Regt. N. I. 
who was unfortunately drowned on board the ship “ Protector” in a gale 
off the Sandheads on the 19th of October 1838, aged 38 years. 

This tablet has been erected by a sincere friend, who appreciated his many worthy and estimable qualities. 


Sacred to the memory of 
John Henry Barlow, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Service ; 
third son of Sir George H. Barlow, Bart. G. C. B. 

He served the state for a period of 27 years, 
his life exhibiting a rare harmony of the qualities of mind and heart, 
that stamp their chief value on official, private and Christian character. 

Born December 7th, 1795, 

Died at. Contai Hidg’ilee, 11th September, 1841. 

“ Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace.” — Ps. xxxvii. 37. 


(Adjoining the North Gallery staircase of St. John’s Church are the following Inscriptions : — ) 

In memory of 

Richard Vaughan, Taxing officer, 

Chief Clerk of the Insolvent Court, 

Keeper of the Records and Muniments, and Receiver of the Supreme Court ; 

Died at Calcutta 31st J uly, 1843. 


In testimony of affection and regret, this Tablet is dedicated to the memory of 
George Cracroft Aubert, 
who on the evening of the 29th of April, 1843, 
riding homeward from the residence of a friend, 

was overtaken by a sudden storm, and with the horse which bore him, was struck dead by lightnin". 

Aged 25 years. 

“ He flourished as a flower of the field, the wind passed over it, and it was gone.” 


BRIGADIER ANQUETIL. — (Late in command of Shah Soojah’s Army.) 

Lieutenant. -Colonel Thomas John Anquetil, one of the many and noble victims of the Cabool 
Massacre, was a Native of the Island of Jersey, and is a Cadet of 1804, he was a man of studious habits. 
There is an anecdote told by some of his shipmates that lie used to study the Hindoostanee at the mast- 
head on his voyage to India. He was well acquainted with the Oriental language, as well as with the 
French. He served with distinction in the Mahrattah Campaign and was for a long period attached to 
the Light Brigade. Ilis first command was that of the Pioneer corps. 

When that regiment was broken up he obtained the command of the 57th Regt. N. I. as Major, 
and from thence lie was appointed to the command of his own Regiment, the 44th N. I. It was 
whilst in this command that he received a letter offering him the Deputy Adjutant Generalship of the 
Army. Whilst on his way to the Presidency Lieut. -Colonel Anquetil was stopped at Cawnpore to assume 
the duties of Adjutant General of the force assembled under General Stevenson, and accompanied that 
force during the Shikawaltic Campaign. At the termination of that duty lie assumed his office of Deputy 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


SI 


Adjutant General of the army ; he was selected purely from the high character he bore, without interest 
or favoritism. He was an officer of undoubted ability, a thorough disciplinarian, and was highly 
versed in the science of military tactics. Ilis private plans and military drawings shewed him to be a 
man thoroughly acquainted with his profession, and he wanted but a fair opening to have distinguished 
himself in the highest military command. He was a warm-hearted man and possessed of the strictest 
integrity and the most honorable feeling, but he did not belong to a particular click in Calcutta, and 
there was some manoeuvering to get him out of the department in which he was then serving. This 
could only be done by offering him a better appointment and one more congenial with his feelings and 
habits. lie was accordingly selected by Lord Auckland to the command of the Oude Contingent force, 
with the rank of Brigadier. Had he remained in the Adjutant General’s department, he would have 
accompanied the army of the Indus under Sir John Keane, would have been a C.B. most probably, 
and would perhaps have been offered to share with the staff of that Army in the “ Uourannie honors !” 
but such was not his lot ; he was, alas ! destined to bear a part in the late eventful scenes in Affghanis- 
tan, and there to terminate his honorable career, ere he had gained those honors which most assuredly, 
from his high qualities and talents he would have attained under more fortunate circumstances. But 
to return to the brief outline of his service. The high efficiency and superior discipline of the Oude force 
did not fail to arrest the attention of the authorities. He was appointed Inspecting officer of all the 
Contingents, and accordingly inspected the Bundlekund Legion, Scindiah’s Contingent, and that of 
Kotah. It was during this tour that he was offered the command of Shah Soojah’s Army, and he 
proceeded through the Punjaub to assume that command. As far as opportunity and time admitted, 
he introduced much order and many improvements in the Army, extensive and scattered as it was 
throughout Affghanistan. Such was the value which he always placed on the drill and internal economy 
of the several Regiments, that he took much pains in personally superintending such important details. 
Some ill natured comparison to the acts of a Sergeant-Major appeared in the public prints, but this was 
far from his character ; he was quite the gentleman ; he insisted on duty being well done by all, but he 
never interfered beyond his proper sphere. He was a safe man and was infinitely above any thing that 
was undignified or unworthy of a high minded gentleman. During the disastrous events prior to the 
evacuation of Cabul, he was only second or third in command. But in the unhappy and fatal retreat, 
we had a glimpse of what he was capable. On succeeding to the chief command, “ he restored order 
where all was confusion. He kept the remnant of the fatal Army admirably together.” At such a 
crisis no common mind could have done this, but he fell at Jugdulluk, and after this all was disorder, 
desperation, annihilation. 

Thus fell Brigadier Thomas John Anquetil, one of the most valuable and zealous officers of the 
Bengal Army. Without any disparagement to others, it is not unreasonable to surmise that since 
he had such influence over the European part of the force, the troops must have held him in much 
respect, and that had his life been spared he might have led a portion of the army onward in safety 
to Jallalabad. It is not possible to decide until after the “ investigation” has been made, what degree 
of responsibility falls on Anquetil for the share he may have borne in the capitulation at Cabul. Many 
conjectures may be formed, but this will be said by those who knew him, that he was the last man 
that would be likely to capitulate, and too experienced in Asiatic warfare to trust to the tender mercies 
of the treacherous Affghans ; treacherous to a proverb, throughout Asia. 

(The following tablet is placed near the Southern Staircase of St. John’s Church: — ) 

To the memory of 

Lieut. -Colonel Thomas John Anquetil, 44th Regt. B. N. I. 
who was massacred in the performance of his duty, during the insurrection at Jugdulluck, 
in Affghanistan, at Cabul, while commanding Shah Soojah’s force, on the 12th January 1842, aged 60 years. 

He was a warm-hearted man, and possessed of the strictest integrity, and the most honorable feeling. 

Erected by his surviving son, Charles Anquetil. 


JAMES PATTLE, ESQ. — (Of the Bengal Civil Service .) 

The late James Pattle, Esq., Senior Member of the Board of Revenue, and the oldest in the Bengal 
Civil Service, died at his residence in Chowringhee, on Thursday the 4th of September, 1845, in the 
69th year of his age. He had been suffering for a long period from a painful disease, which terminated 
in his death. He entered the Civil Service in the year 1790. Inconsequence of Mr. Pattle’s own 
earnest request his funeral did not take place here, but his remains yere sent to England and deposited 
in the Vault of his family at Camberwell. He lived respected and beloved. 


The following is inscribed on a Tablet on the Southern Wing of St. John’s Church : 

Sacred to the memory of James Pattle, of the Bengal Civil Service, Obiit. 4th Sep. A. D. 1845 Hfflal 69. 
“ O be Thou our help in trouble, for vain is the help of man.” — 60 Ps. II v. 

Also to Adeline, his Wife, 
who died at Sea on the 11th Nov. 1845, aged 52. 

“ And all wept and bewailed her, but Jesus said, weep not, she is not dead but sleepeth.”— Luke 8th c. 52 v. 

In token of the love of their sorrowing children. 


The following is the inscription on a handsome Monument placed in the Southern Wing of St. John’s 
Church : — ' 

the memory ot Lieut.-Colonel James Achilles Kirkpatrick, 

• r ^ Honorable Hast Jnclia Company s IVIiJitary Establishment ol Eort St. (Jeorcfe 
who, after filling the distinguished Station as Resident at the Court of Hyderabad upwards of nine vents 
and successfully conducting during that period various important negociations 
Died at Calcutta 15th October 1805, aged 41 years. 

This Monument is erected by his afflicted father and brothers. 


32 


ST. JOHN’S CIIURCH. 


Transcendant art ! whose magic skill alone. 

Can soften rock and animate a stone. 

By symbol mark the heart, reflect the head, 

And raise a living image from the dead ! 

Cease from these toils, and lend the chisel’s grace 
To filial virtues courting your embrace. 

These relate his pride, his transport, and relief, 

A father’s tears commemorate, with grief ! 

Still while their genial lustre cheers his breast. 
Emits a ray that points to blissful rest ; 

Hope built on Faith, affection's balm and cure, 
Divinely whispers “Their reward is sure.” — [J. K.J 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JAMES ACHILLES KIRKPATRICK. 


Lieut. -Col. James Achilles Kirkpatrick, was the son of Colonel Kirkpatrick, formerly of the 
East India Company’s Military Service, at Fort St. George, and late of Keston, near Bromley, in Kent, 
and was born A. D. August 1764. After receiving a liberal education at different respectable Seminaries, 
and at Eton, he was appointed to the military service of the East India Company, and proceeded 
in the year 1779-80, as a Cadet, to Madras. In 1778-9, the impaired state of his health compelled 
him to revisit his native country, where, however, he remained but a short time, returning to India 
before the conclusion of the first war with Tippoo Sultan, in the second campaign of which he 
served with the reserve of the army, under the command of Lieut. -Colonel (Major General) Gowdie. 
Towards the end of 1793 he was appointed to the charge of the Garrison of Vizianagram, which he 
soon relinquished for the appointment of Persian translator to the detachment serving with his Highness 
the Nizam. In this situation he continued until October 1795, when, on the death of Lieutenant 
William Stewart, he succeeded to the office of Assistant to the Residency at Hydrabad, which was at that 
period filled by his brother, Colonel William Kirkpatrick, who being obliged early in the year 1797 to 
proceed to Bombay, and subsequently to the Cape of Good Hope, for the benefit of his health, the charge 
of the British interests at the Court of Hyderabad devolved on the subject of our present notice. 

It was during the period of Ms acting as Resident at the Court of Hyderabad that Captain Kirk- 
patrick had the honor, under the directions of the Marquis Wellesly, of negociating and concluding 
with his Highness the Nizam the important treaty by which the alarming power and influence of France 
in the Deccan were completely annihilated, and that Prince was thus rendered an efficient ally of the 
Company and enabled to co-operate with effect in the war which was soon after produced by the perfidy 
and restless ambition of Tippoo Sultaun. Lord Mornington testified his approbation of this important 
and eminent service by appointing Captain Kirkpatrick to the vacant office of Resident at the Court of 
the Nizam, and by conferring on him the peculiar distinction of Honorary Aid-de-Camp to the Governor 
General. He was the first person on whom this honor was bestowed, though it has since extended to 
others. It may in a peculiar manner be said to have been instituted to mark and dignify the merits of 
Captain Kirkpatrick. 

In October, 1800, Captain Kirkpatrick, after a long and arduous negociation, succeeded in concluding 
a new treaty with the Nizam, whereby the political ties which connected the British Government and the 
state of Hydrabad were drawn together more closely than before : while the money subsidy hitherto 
paid by his Highness in defrayment of the expences of the British Troops employed in the defence of 
his dominions, was commuted for the territories acquired by his Highness in consequence of the wars of 
1791-2, and 1799 with Tippoo Sultaun, which were now assigned in perpetual sovereignty to the 
Company. The sense entertained by Lord Wellesly of Captain Kirkpatrick’s services on this important 
occasion will best appear from the following copy of a letter from his Lordship to Captain Kirkpatrick, 
dated November 10th, 1800 : — 

Sir, 


“ Since the commencement of my administration of the affairs of the British empire in India, frequent 
occasions have arisen at the Court of Hyderabad to require the exertions of address, firmness and 
perseverance on the part of the British Resident and on the success of the negociations entrusted to his 
management, the most important political interests of the Company in India have essentially depended. 
In all these instances your general conduct has afforded me the greatest degree of satisfaction, and I 
now repeat, with pleasure, the public tribute of justice which I rendered to your eminent services in 
accelerating the destruction of the Trench influence at Hyderabad, in the year 1798, and in bringing the 
Nizam’s forces into the field with so much promptitude and alacrity during the war in Mysore in 1799. 
The conclusion of the treaty of the 12th of October 1800 furnishes a confident expectation of the 
lasting security and permanent duration of the British power in the Deccan; the service which you have 
rendered to the Company and to the British interests in India by your able and assiduous exertions 
throughout the course of the long and intricate negociations which preceded this important measure, 
demands my most cordial approbation and entitles you to the gratitude of the Company and of your 
country. 

“ I discharge a satisfactory part of my public duty in recording these sentiments on the proceedings 
of this Government, but the peculiar merit of your services and the great importance of the beneficial 
consequences which have flowed from yoursuccess will induce me to submit to the Court of Directors 
my earnest recommendation that you should be rewarded by some honorable mark of public distinction. 


I am, Sir, &c. 

(Signed) Wellesly.” 

In December 1800 Captain Kirkpatrick attained the rank of Major in the army on the Madras Esta- 
blishment. From this time nothing material occurred at the Court of Hyderabad, until April 1802, 
when Major Kirkpatrick concluded a treaty of commerce between the East India Company and his 
Highness. By this treaty the merchants acquired for the first time a degree of security, and the trade of 


ST. JOHN’S CHURCH. 


33 


the two countries received an impulse that has since conduced essentially to the advantage of both. 1 he 
difficulties experienced by Major Kirkpatrick in accomplishing the beneficial measure, and consequently 
the merit of his success on the occasion, can only be duly appreciated by those who are acquainted with 
the extraordinary obstinacy, the profound ignorance of every true principle of commerce, and the fixed 
prejudices which usually prevail in Asiatic, and particularly in Mahomedan Courts, on almost every 
question of political economy. 

In the year 1803 the British Government was compelled, in defence of its own rights and those of its 
allies, (both of them invaded by the restless ambition of the confederated Mahratta chieftains, Dowlut 
Rao Scindeah, Raghojie Bhosillah, and Jeswunt Rao Holkar,) to appeal to arms. On this occasion 
the power of the Court of Hyderabad, stimulated by the unremitted exertions of the Resident, proved 
eminently useful, and contributed, in no small degree, to the speedy and glorious termination of the war 
in the Deccan. What considerably enhanced the merits of these efforts was, their being made in the 
midst of difficulties occasioned by the daily expectation of the Nizam’s death, and consequent anxiety 
respecting a succession to the throne. His Highness actually died on the Gth of August, being only 
two days prior to the commencement of hostilities by the attack on and capture of Ahmednaghur. 
Owing however, to the prudent measures adopted by Major Kirkpatrick under the general direction of 
Lord Wellesly, Secunder Jah, succeeded to the vacant musnud of his father without the slightest 
opposition, and the energies of the new Government were immediately applied to a vigorous co-operation 
with the British forces against the common enemy. 

The favourable sentiments entertained by Lord Wellesly of Major Kirkpatrick’s conduct and ser- 
vices on this occasion, were signified to him by direction of his Lordship, in the following terms, 
contained in a letter dated 30th of March, 1804 

“ Lord Wellesly desires me to add, that as soon as the British troops are withdrawn from the field, 
and are returned to their usual stations, it is his intention to afford you a public testimony of his appro- 
bation of your conduct, during the late crisis of affairs ; and to recommend your services to the notice 
of the Court of Directors, and of his Majesty’s Ministers. His Lordship will not loose sight of your 
claim to some mark of distinction to his Majesty’s Government in England, and will not fail to urge 
your pretentions in the manner most likely to obtain for you those honors, to which he is of opinion 
you are entitled for your public services under his Lordship’s administration, which he recommended 
strongly to the Government in England some years ago ; and which in his judgment have been withheld 
from you unjustly.” 

In October 1804 Major Kirkpatrick was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant- Colonel, and in 
September of the following year lie proceeded to Calcutta with the permission of the late Governor 
General, Lord Cornwallis, partly for the benefit of his health, which was somewhat impaired by his 
long residence in Hyderabad, but chiefly for the purpose of conferring with his Lordship, on the 
political affairs of that Court. He reached Calcutta under the affliction of an alarming complaint with 
which he had been seized on his journey, and of which he died on the 15th of October 1805, after a 
short illness, in the 41st year of his age. 

In private life he was eminently distinguished for all those qualities which gain the esteem, fix the 
attachment, and secure the confidence of friendship ; and his numerous friends will long and deeply 
lament his premature death, with a sorrow which can alone be surpassed by that of his afflicted family, 
who have, in him, lost a relation beloved with the warmest tenderness and the purest affection. The 
high diplomatic situation in which he died, he had filled for a period of nine eventful years ; and it has 
been shewn, that, in the course of that time, he was successfully employed under the direction of the 
Marquis Wellesly, in some of the most important negociations which took place during the wise, 
vigorous, and brilliant administration of that enlightened and illustrious Statesman. The recorded testi- 
monies of the zeal and talents which he displayed in his official character, are no less just than numerous ; 
and whilst they bestow on his memory the most honorable tribute, they hold out to others the most 
encouraging example. 

In addition to public honors, the general respect entertained for his character was strongly testified 
by a numerous attendance of the principal European inhabitants of Calcutta at his funeral ; a respect 
which is greatly enhanced by the circumstance of his being in some measure a stranger in this settlement, 
and which therefore serves to shew the high estimation in which he was universally held. 

Lieutenant- Colonel Kirkpatrick was interred in the South Park Street Burial-ground. The Inscrip- 
tion on the Monument will be found inserted among those in the Cemetery. 1 


( Near the S. E. entrance of St. John's Church :) 


M. S. 

Gavini Young, Armigeri, 

Juris Militaris apud exereitum Bengalensisam summi interpretis. 
Qui Lceculi Hujus Militiam Cbristi Disciplina Condecoravit, 
virtutem fide arma Litteris humanioribus 
Litteras Humaniores. 

S. S. scriptuarum scientia ampliavit 
vir doctus. Probus integer persapiens Annos vixit low indies suis carior 
supremum ObiitDiem Prid non mart A. D. MDCCCXL1. 
Mooe rentes spe tamen cum Laeta 
Christi meritis freti, Posuerunt amici, 


v 


34 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


REV. JOHN ZACHARIAH KIERNANDER, (Founder of the Old, or Mission Church.) 


Rev. John Zachariah Kiemander, founder of the Old, or Mission Church, was born on the 
21st of November 1711, at Akstad in Sweden, a place situated about 4 Swedish miles from the 
great city of Lindkoping, in the province of East Gothland. He received the first rudiments of 
scholastic learning at the Gymnasium of Lindkoping, but completed his education at the University 
of Upeal. In his 24th year he became desirous of visiting foreign Universities, and on obtaining 
recommendatory letters and a passport, by the influence of his friends in Stockholm, he took his 
passage through the Baltic to Stralsund, and from thence to Halle in Saxony, where he arrived on the 
17th of November 1735. He was favorably received at the University of Halle by Doctor Gothilf August 
Franke, who immediately appointed him Inspector of the Latin School, and afterwards favoured him with 
other benefices. Kiernander spent four years under the patronage of Dr. Franke when, having satisfied 
his youthful curiosity, he began to think of returning to Sweden, but at this very crisis a circumstance 
occurred which took him from his native land for ever. The Society instituted at London for Promot- 
ing Christian Knowledge wrote to Dr. Franke, requesting him to recommend to them a proper person 
to be sent out as a Missionary to Cuddalore. Dr. Franke made the proposal to Kiernander, who, after 
some deliberation, accepted the vocation. On the 20th of November 1739, he was ordained to the 
ministry. 

Mr. Kiernander immediately set out for London, where he arrived on the 25th of December. He 
was lodged at Kensington by his Majesty’s chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Ziegenhagen,* and on the 29th 
introduced by that gentleman to the Society, who received him with a public welcome. 

Mr. Kiernander left England in the “ Colchester” Indiaman on the 29th of April 1740, and arrived 
at Cuddalore on the 23th of August as colleague to the Rev. John Ernest Gueister, who was appointed 
to Madras in 1744, when the charge of Cuddalore devolved on Mr. Kiernander, who then had a congrega- 
tion of 154 persons left by Sartorious, a former Missionary, removed to Madras. Mr. Kiernander was 
treated with the most polite attention by Admiral Boscawen, and the Government of Fort St. David. 
That Government put him in possession of the Portuguese Roman Catholic Church at Cuddalore, and 
at the same time expelled all Popish Priests from the Company’s territories. 

On the 26th of November 1749, the day after the receipt of the Governor’s order, the English, 
Tamulian and Portuguese congregation assembled to hear divine service, and a sermon in the three 
different languages, when the church was solemnly dedicated, and called Christ Church. 

The Mission prospered much under new hands ; Mr. K. was in the habit of going several times a- week 
to the villages to make known the Gospel of Jesus Christ ; his congregation in Cuddalore increased to 
200 persons, and in the following year received an increase of 160 converts. 

About this period Mr. Kiernander was married to Miss Wendela Fischer, a lady of some property; 
she was an amiable woman, an attached wife, and, being faithful to God, was a helpmeet for him in 
preaching the Gospel. With this lady he lived in happiness many years, and “ the Lord prospered 
his labours.” 

On the 4th May 1758, Lieutenant General Count Lally took Cuddalore by capitulation; Kiernander 
waited on that impetuous officer, who told him no Protestant missionary was then required at Cuddalore, 
but that he would grant him a passport to go to Tranquebar ; this was accepted, and on the 8th of May 
Mr. Kiernander arrived at the Danish capital, stripped of all his property excepting a few articles of 
apparel. He was a man of ardent zeal, of great integrity, with a dauntless courage and decision of 
mind ; both he and his wife were devoted to the cause of their Lord and Saviour ; they had borne their 
trials together, supporting each other’s faith in the midst of them, living as heirs together of the grace of 
life ; the blessing of God was upon them as they laboured in his service. Mr. K. was a man of polite 
address and handsome countenance, alike fitted to appear in the Court of a Nawab or in the hamlet of 
a Hindoo. On the 2d of the following June, Fort St. David fell also by capitulation to the arms of 
France, in consequence of which, as no immediate prospect appeared of the restoration of the English 
to Cuddalore, Kiernander turned his eyes to Bengal, where the battle of Plassey, in the preceding year, 
had laid the foundation of an empire. 

On the 11th of September Mr. Kiernander left Tranquebar, accommodated by the munificence of 
the Danes, — the friends of the true religion. On the 29th of the same month he arrived in Calcutta, and 
declared his intentions to the Government of establishing a Mission there. Governor Clive, Mr. Watts, 
and the other gentlemen of the Council approved of and favored his propositions. 

Mr. Kiernander, on the 4th of November 1758, was blessed with a son. The reader may judge what 
a reception Mr. Kiernander met with in Calcutta, when he is told that Colonel Robert Clive, Mrs. 
Margaret Clive, Mr. William Watts, and Mrs. Frances Watts, stood sponsors for the child, who was 
named Robert William, in honor of his high sponsors. 

Mr. Kiernander opened the Mission School at Calcutta on the 1st of December 1758 ; on the 31st of 
December of the following year 175 children were received by him, 37 of which number he had pro- 
vided for. Mr. Kiernander at this time occasionally preached at Serampore, where the Danes, then in 
an infant settlement, had no chaplain. 

Mr. Kiernander was very graciously received in Calcutta by the Rev. Henry Butler and the Rev. 
John Cape, Chaplains at the settlement ; in the years 1758, 1759-’60 and ’61, they procured him large 
subscriptions for carrying on the pious work he was engaged in, and assisted in his peculiar offices as 
a minister of the Gospel. Mr. Kiernander on the 9th of May 1761 was deprived ot his lady; the 
marriage was one of affection and never impaired by the bitter vicissitudes of life. She was a woman 


* I he same gentleman who died in the year 1776, after being 53 years Chaplain to the Royal German 
Chapel at St. James’. 


35 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 

of piety and devoted to her husband, and she lived to see him admired and esteemed by all ; while his 
religion was steadfast in the midst of many snares. The succeeding year, the 10th day of February 1762, 
witnessed his union with Mrs. Anne Wolley. In the year 1767 Mr. Kiernander was obliged to remove 
from the house left him by the Company for the use of his Church and school, and, in consequence, 
resolved to purchase ground and build a Church at his own expense. In May of that year, and the 
27th of his Mission, he laid the foundation-stone of the present Mission Church. About this period the 
Court of the Emperor, Shah Alum, requested from Mr. Kiernander some copies of the Psalter and 
New Testament in the Arabic language ; he complied, and had the satisfaction to hear they were so well 
received by his Majesty’s Mallahs that he transmitted to Allahabad, where the Court was then held, all 
the Arabic Psalters and Testaments in his possession. 

As Mr. Kiernander was advancing in years he took two associates to assist him ; they were Romish 
Priests, who, on their arrival at Calcutta, made a public abjuration from the errors of Popery : the 
Rev. Mr. Bento de Silvestre and the Rev. Nanel Joze De Costa. These gentlemen drew on themselves 
the censure of the conclave of Goa, and a Romish Priest was sent from thence to Calcutta, to excommuni- 
cate them ; but his vain threats did not in the smallest degree effect the Protestant Mission at Calcutta. 
The Mission Church would have been completed in 1770, had not its progress been stopped by the death 
of the Architect.* The persevering Kiernander, by his own unremitting diligence, compensated in part 
for this misfortune. On the 23d December the sacred edifice was consecrated and named Beth Tephilla, 
which in the Hebrew language signifies the House of Prayer; the building cost the founder above 
60,000 Sicca Rupees, 1,818 only of which sum, had been presented in benefactions. Thus, after a 
lapse of fourteen years, Calcutta once more beheld an English Church, completed at the expense of a 
stranger ! 

As a piece of architecture Beth Tephilla cannot be compared to the old Church of St. John, des- 
troyed by the barbarians in 1756 ; one was founded by an individual, the other by the united charity 
of opulent merchants, in days when gold was plenty, labour cheap, and not one indigent European 
to be found in all Calcutta ! Existing authorities testify to the perfect composition of that temple, 
to which the Governor, on every Sunday, walked in solemn procession, attended by all the Civil 
Servants and all the Military off duty. We learn from a tradition handed down to us by Lady Russell, 
that the steeple of St. John’s was very lofty and uncommonly magnihcent. Mr. Kiernander wishing to 
make the Mission Church as lasting as possible, constructed it of the best materials. 

Mr. Kiernander lost his second lady in June 1773, after a continued sickness of six months; she 
left her jewels for the benefit of Beth Tephilla ; with the amount produced Mr. Kiernander founded a 
Mission School on his own ground, in the rear of the Church, capable of holding 250 children ; it 
was founded on the 7th of July 1773, and completed on the 14th of March 1774. About this period 
the Rev. Mr. Diemar arrived to assist the Mission. In the year 1778 Mr. Kiernander began to expe- 
rience the. frailties and infirmities of age, his sight failed him; and in 1782 he was obliged to submit 
to the painful operation of having his eyes couched ; that operation succeeded so well, that he was soon 
after able to write to the Society to congratulate them, “ on his happiness, in once more being enabled 
to see the prosperity of the Mission.” Lady Coote, when at Calcutta, attended and received the 
sacrament at the Mission Church. 

“This good example,” says the Missionary, “ is attended with a very happy influence and gives great- 
encouragement to the congregation.” 

In the year 1783 the Rev. Mr. Western Hulse, Chaplain to the late Sir Eyre Coote, on his return to 
Europe, made the Mission a present of 500 Sicca Rupees ; Mr. Kiernander himself give a thousand 
Rupees, and his son, Mr. Robert William Kiernander, gave 3,000 Rupees, the yearly interest of which 
was to be applied to the support of the Mission. 

Mr. Diemar this season returned to Europe. 

Here we must reverse the scene and prepare ourselves to behold more unpleasing prospects. In the 
year 1786 a cloud of adversity was gathering over the hoary head of Kiernander ! He foresaw the ap- 
proaching calamity, and wrote to the Society in England, expressing a wish of going to London with his 
son, and earnestly soliciting them to send out another Missionary, lest his congregation should be forsaken 
and his Church shut up. This venerable patriarch was now in the 76th year of his age and the 47th of 
his Mission, an age at which, in any climate, the debilitated frame must feel severely the reverse of 
fortune ; but how unspeakably severe must it be felt by one, who for a period equal to the ordinary 
life of man, had been accustomed to the gentle ease of India ! The hovering cloud burst in 1787, and 
the ruin of all his fortunes followed.f The Seal of the Sheriff of Calcutta was placed even on Beth 


* Mr. Martin Boutant de Mevell, a Danish Architect. 

f It is generally known that Mr. Kiernander about this time became a bankrupt, and a kind of 
reproach has rested in consequence on the character of that eminent Missionary. Now the chief blame 
attaching to this holy man seems to have been an error of judgment, in advanced life, in signing bonds 
for his son, Mr. Robert Kiernander, and thus putting in jeopardy his property and usefulness. This 
son appears to have had charge of his father’s concerns during three years that he was totally blind 
from cataract. He was a young, inexperienced person, and was drawn by various parties, some of 
them natives, to engage in building houses. The bonds for raising the money required, were most 
injudiciously signed by the venerable father, then between 70 and 80 years of age. An alarm took 
place amongst the young man s creditors, and his whole property with that of his father, was attached 
by the Sheriff, and sold at a ruinous loss. No writ was issued against the persons of Mr. Kiernander 
and his son. They resigned at once all they had to the hands of their creditors, and retired to 
Chinsurah. 

Such appears the real extent of the fault of this great Missionary, to be lamented deeply but not to 
be exaggerated into a fall from the spirit of the Gospel, and a dishonor put on his sacred profession. 


36 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


Tephillah ! The late Charles Grant, Esq. East India Director, immediately stepped forward and restored 
the Church to religion ; he paid for it the sum it was appraised at, ten thousand Rupees ! Yes. One person 
stepped forward ami saved the temple, where the hymns of truth had been chaunted for seventeen 
years ! The property of the Church, School and Burying Ground, was transferred on the last day of 
October 1787, to three trustees: the Rev. Mr. Brown, Mr. William Chambers, and the purchaser, 
Mr. Charles Grant. Thenceforward it ceased to be the property of an individual. Since the transfer 
of their Church, the Society have not been fortunate in their selection of Missionaries, and the duty 
for upwards of 20 years devolved chiefly on the Rev. Mr. Brown, who, with such other chaplains as 
have been attached to the Presidency, have rendered their voluntary services to the Mission. 
Mr. Kiernander was now resolved to quit Calcutta and offer his services to the Dutch at Chinsurah, 
where he was appointed Chaplain ; before his departure he went to the Burying Ground, and there 
wept and bewailed between the graves of his two wives. 

Amidst all the wreck of earthly things, the hope of eternal life was blooming in his soul, and the man 
was happy. At Chinsurah lie performed service twice on the Sabbath, in a small Lutheran Church ; 
the people were intent on commerce, and he found their society any thing but a pleasure. He was 
within a few miles of Serampore, where he found a few kindred spirits, some of whom acknowledged 
the benefit they had received through the words he had preached in their ears, and it was a pleasure 
to him to hear this ; but even from his latter resting place he was doomed to be again thrust. In 1795, 
war was declared by England against Holland, and the factory of Chinsurah was captured, Kiernander 
was taken prisoner of war ; but, at last, he was permitted to go to Calcutta. How strange and un- 
searchable are the ways of God ! This was the place appointed for him to end his days ; he was taken 
into the house of a relation of one of his wives, and in the following spring, while rising from his chair, 
he fell and broke his thigh. During his illness, he was occasionally visited by the Rev. David Brown, 
and a few others, who did their duty, in trying to comfort the aged pilgrim. His intellect remained 
firm, and in a letter to his native place, Akstad, he blessed the day he had left it, to preach the Gospel, 
and foretold that the whole English nation would unite in one Society to send the Gospel to the East 
Indies, and that this would give stability to the British power there. 

What counsel could his visitors now offer to this man of nearly a century, compared to the stores 
which his chequered life had laid up ? Even now his mind was in all its vigour ; it was sad, yet beau- 
tiful, to sit at his bedside. 

The Rev. John Zachariah Kiernander died in Calcutta at the advanced age of eighty-eight, after a 
residence in India of nearly sixty years. His remains were entombed in the sepulchre of his second 
lady, at the Mission Burial Ground, formerly called by his own name. 

The success which attended him throughout his labours, both at Cuddalore and Calcutta, w T as remark- 
able. For example, from 1776 to 1786, the increase to his Portuguese and native congregation in Cal- 
cutta was 518, and during the period of 28 years he baptized at least 209 adult heathen and received 
into his congregation 300 awakened and converted Roman Catholics. 

His liberality throughout life was conspicuous. At one time he supported 40 children at his own 
expense ; at another, he fitted up a house for his native congregation, then he built, as before stated, at 
an expense of 60 or 70,000 Rupees, the old Church, which was opened in December 1770 ; next he 
added school-rooms ; lastly, a Parsonage House was erected. In the meantime the poor ever found in 
him a friend and helper ; and his hospitality to strangers and visitors to Calcutta was the theme of 
every one’s commendation. 

He was in poverty, but not in a state of destitution in the close of life ; for the property settled on 
his daughter-in-law was of course saved from the general wreck, and this afforded him means of sup- 
port and comfort. He died in 1799. 


THE REVEREND HENRY MARTYN. 

Menry Martyn, the subject of this memoir, was born at Truro, in the county of Cornwall, on the 
18th of February 1781. He was the third son of Mr. John Martyn, who was originally a labourer in 
the Mines near Gwanaf, the place of his nativity, with no education but such as a country reading 
school offered ; daring the periods of relaxation from manual labour he so intensely devoted his atten- 
tion that, in time, he acquired a complete knowledge of Arithmetic, and some acquaintance also with 
Mathematics ; and no sooner had he gathered these valuable and substantial fruits of persevering deli- 
gence in a soil most unfriendly to their growth, than he was raised from a state of poverty and depres- 
sion to one of comparative ease and comfort. Admitted into the office of Mr. Daniel, a merchant in 
Truro, he lived there as Chief Clerk, piously and respectably, enjoying considerably more than a compe- 
tency. Hem-y, being 7 and 8 years of age, was placed by his father, about mid-summer 1788, at a 
Grammar School in the town, the master of which was the Reverend Cornelius Cardew, D.D. Of his 
childhood, previous to this period, little or nothing can be ascertained ; but those who knew him, con- 
sidered him a boy of promising abilities. Upon his first entering the school, Dr. Cardew observes, 
“ he did not fail to answer the expectations that had been formed of him ; his proficiency in the classes 
exceeded that of most of his school-fellows, yet there were boys who made a more rapid progress — not 
perhaps that their abilities were superior, but their application was greater ; for he appeared to be the 
idlest among them, but of a lively cheerful temper, and was frequently known to go up to his lesson 
with little or no preparation, as if he had learned it merely by intuition. Henry remained here till he 
was between 14 and 15 years of age, at which period he was induced to offer himself as candidate for a 
vacant scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Young as he was, he went there without any 
interest in the University, and with only a single letter to one of the Tutors ; and there he acquitted 
himself so well, (though strongly and ably opposed) that in the opinion of some of the examiners, he 
ought to have been elected. How often is the hand of God seen in frustrating our fondest designs. 
Had success attended him, the whole circumstances of his after life would have been varied ; and 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 37 

however his temporal interests might have been promoted, his spiritual interests would probably have 
sustained a proportionate loss. 

After this repulse, Henry returned home, and continued to attend Dr. Car dew’s School (ill June 
1797. In the spring of this year he directed his views towards the University of Cambridge, his 
residence being at St. John’s College, where his name had been previously entered in the month of 
October 1797. Here his time was so well employed that at the second public examination in the 
summer, he reached the second station in the first class, a point of elevation which flattered his pride 
not a little. The tenor of Henry Martyn’s life, during this and the succeeding year which he passed 
at College, was t'o the eye of all who knew, amiable and commendable in the highest degree. He 
was outwardly moral, and by unwearied application, exhibited marks of no ordinary conduct ; but he 
seemed to have been totally ignorant of spiritual things, and to have lived without God in the world. 
However it pleased God to convince him by a most affecting visitation of his Providence, that there was 
a knowledge far more important to him than any human science. The sudden and heart rending intelli- 
gence of the death of his father was the proximating cause. It was not long after Henry had been 
called to endure this gracious, though grievous, chastening from above, that the public exercises com- 
menced in the University. From this time to that of proposing himself for admission to a Fellowship in 
his College, Mr. Martyn’s engagements consisted chiefly in instructing some pupils and preparing him- 
self for the examination, which was to take place previous to the election in the month of March 1802, 
when he was chosen fellow of St. John’s, soon after which he was admitted a Bachelor of Arts. Having 
thus added another honor to those for which he was distinguished, Mr. Martyn departed from Cam- 
bridge on a visit to his relations in Cornwall. 

In the beginning of October 1802, all those tranquil and domestic joys were exchanged for the 
severe engagements of the University, and the conclusion of this year constituted a memorable era in 
Martyn’s life. We have already seen him become the servant of Christ, dedicating himself to the 
ministry of the Gospel, and we now behold him in a higher character, that of a Christian Missionary. 
The immediate cause of his determination to undertake this office was a remark on the benefit which 
had resulted from the services of Dr. Carey amongst the heathen of British India ; accordingly, when 
he left England, he left it wholly for Christ’s sake, and he left it forever. 

On the 7 th of January, the East Indiaman which was to convey Mr. Martyn to Calcutta, sailed from 
Portsmouth and arrived at Calcutta on the 14th of May 1806. Mr. M. was received by the Rev. 
David Brown, at his residence at Aldeen, near Calcutta. Here he applied himself most ardently to the 
acquisition of Hindostanee, availing himself of the assistance of a Cashmerian Brahmin, whom he wearied 
with his unbending assiduity. He was also constant in preaching the Gospel to his countrymen, both 
in the Mission Church and the new Church in Calcutta. 

On the 13th September Mr. Martyn received his appointment to Dinapore, where he arrived on the 
26tli November. Here he commenced his ministry mid continued until 1809, when he received the 
intelligence of his mother’s death. He removed from Dinapore to Cawnpore ; here also he received the 
news of the demise of his sister, who had been so instrumental in his conversion to the Lord. 

During Mr. Martyn’s residence at Cawnpore he continued to minister assiduously in the early part 
of the year 1810, to the temporal and spiritual wants of the poor, who statedly assembled before his 
house ; nor did he cease to do so whilst his health permitted. 

In the midst of these exertions, a painful attack in the chest of a severer kind than he had ever before 
experienced, forced upon Mr. Martyn’s mind the unwelcome conviction of the necessity of some quiet- 
ness and remission from labor. Such was the sinking state of his health, notwithstanding the seasonable 
and important assistance derived from the presence of Corrie, that a removal from Cawnpore, either to 
make a trial of the effect of a sea voyage, or a return, for a short time, to England, became a matter of 
urgent necessity. The adoption of the latter expedient he had once determined upon, but again con- 
ceiving that a bracing air would be beneficial, Mr. Martyn departed from Cawnpore on the 1st Octo- 
ber, for Mr. Brown’s residence at Aldeen, which he safely reached on the evening of the last day of 
the month, restored after an absence of 4 years to an intercourse with his. friends, (who on beholding 
his pallid countenance and enfeebled frame, knew not whether to mourn most or to rejoice.) Though 
still exceedingly infirm, he yet, with one exception, preached every sabbath at Calcutta, until he finally 
left it. 

On the 7th January, after having preached a sermon on the Anniversary of the Calcutta Bible So- 
ciety, addressed the inhabitants of Calcutta, from that text of Scripture — “ That one thing is needful,” 
Mr. Martyn departed forever from those shores where he had fondly and fully purposed to spend all 
his days. 

He took his passage in the ship “ Ahmoody,” Capt. Kinsey, bound to Bombay, from which place he 
embarked on the “ Benares,” Captain Sealy, for Bushire, where he commenced travelling by land to 
Shiraz. 

On the evening of the 24th May, one year after entering where his time was spent, preaching and 
arguing with the different sects on the coasts of Persia, Mr. Martyn left Shiraz with the intention to lay 
before the King his translation of the New Testament ; but finding that, tvithout a letter of introduction 
from the British Ambassador, he could not be admitted into the royal presence, he determined to proceed 
to Tehran, where, at that time, Sir Gore Ouseley, his Britannic Majesty’s Minister, was residing. While 
on his way thither his fever and ague increased with unremitting severity, but Sir Gore Ouseley, 
together with his lady, paid him the most constant attention. On account of the general state of his 
health, he determined to return to England by land, and accordingly he set his face towards it. His 
journey was the most painful. The miseries he endured were intense, and it ended in his entrance into 
heaven. 

On the 2nd September, Mr. Martyn set out on his long journey of one thousand three hundred 
miles, and on the 5th October reached Tocat, at a moment when the inhabitants of that place were 
flying from the town because of the plague which was raging there. On the following day, “ no horses 


38 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


being procurable,” he says in his journal, “ I had an unexpected repose. ; I sat in the orchard, and thought, 
with sweet comfort and peace, of my God, in solitude ; my company, my friends, my comforters. O ■ 
when shall time give place to eternity ; when shall appear the new heaven and new earth where dwelleth 
righteousness ; there shall in nowise enter in any thing that defileth ; none of that wretchedness that 
has made man worse than the beasts of the field ; none of those corruptions that add still more to the 
mission of mortality shall he seen or heard any more.” Scarcely had Mr. Martyn breathed these as- 
pirations after that state of blissful purity, for which he had attained such a measure of meekness, 
than he was called to exchange a condition, of pain, weakness and suffering, for that everlasting “ rest 
which remaineth for the people of God.” At Tocat, on the 16th of October 18P2, either falling a 
sacrifice to the plague, which then raged there, or sinking under that disorder which when he penned 
his last words, had so greatly reduced him, he surrendered his soul into the hands of his Redeemer. 

So richly was the. mind of Mr. Martyn endowed by the God of nature and of grace, that at no 
period could his death be a subject of common lamentation to those who valued the interest of the 
church of Christ. “ He was in all hearts,” observed one of his friends in India. “ We honoured him, 
we loved him, we thanked God for him, we prayed for his continuance among us ; rejoiced in the good 
he was doing ; we are sadly bereaved ; where such fervent piety and extensive knowledge, and vigorous 
understanding and classical taste and unwearied application were all united, what might not have been 
expected ; we cannot dwell upon the subject without feeling very sad. I land upon the walls of 
Jerusalem, and see the lamentable breach that has been made in them, but it is the Lord ; He gave and 
he hath taken away.” 

“ Mr. Martyn,” remarked another of his friends, in describing more particularly his intellectual 
endowments, “ combined in himself certain valuable but distinct qualities seldom found together in the 
same individual. The easy triumphs of a rapid genius over first difficulties never left him satisfied with 
present attainments ; his mind, which naturally ranged on a wide field of human knowledge, lost nothing 
of depth in its expansiveness. He was one of those few persons, whose reasoning faculty does not 
suffer from their imagination, nor then- imagination from their reasoning faculty ; both, in him, were 
fully exercised, and of a very high order. His mathematical acquisitions clearly left him without a rival 
of his own age ; and yet to have known only the employments of his more free and unfettered moments, 
would have led to the conclusion that the classics and poetry were his predominant passion. But these 
talents, excellent as they were, are lost in the brightness of those Christian graces, by which he shone 
as a light in the world, holding forth the word of life. In his faith, there was a singular, a child-like 
simplicity ; great was its energy, both in obeying Christ, and suffering for his name’s sake. By this he 
could behold blossoms upon the rod when it was apparently dead, and, in those events which, like the 
captain of the Lord’s host seen by Joshua, presented at first a hostile aspect, he could discern a 
favourable and friendly countenance. 

Having listened to that tender and overwhelming introduction of his Saviour, ‘‘lovest thou me ?” his 
love was fervently exercised towards God and man at all times and in all places ; for it was not like the 
landspring which runs violently for a season and then ceases ; it resembled the fountain which flows 
with a perennial stream from the recesses of the rock. His fear of God and tenderness of conscience, 
and his watchfulness over his own heart could scarcely be surpassed in this state of sinful infirmity ; but 
it was his humility that was most remarkable : it might be considered as the warp of which the entire 
texture of his piety was composed ; and with this his other Christian graces were so intimately blended 
as to beautify and adorn his whole demeanour. It was, in truth, the accordance and consent of various 
Christian attainments in Mr. Martyn which were so striking. The symetry of his stature in Christ was as 
surprizing as its heighth. That communion which he held with his God, and which caused his face to 
shine, was ever tempered, like the Patriarchs of old, with the most awful reverence. The nearer the access 
with which he was favored, the more deeply did he feel that he was but sinful dust and ashes. No 
discordance could be discovered between peace and penitence ; no opposition between joy and God and 
utter abasement before him, and truly in this, as in every other respect, he had thoroughly imbibed the 
spirit of his own church, which, in the midst of one of her sublimest Hymns of praise, would have her 
members prostrate themselves before their Redeemer, in these words of humiliation, “ Thou that takest 
away the sins of the World, have mercy upon us.” To be zealous without love, or to have that which 
is miscalled “ charity, without decision of character,” is neither difficult or uncommon. 

Mr. Martyn’s zeal was tempered with love, and his love invigorated by zeal ; he combined also, ardour 
with prudence, gravity with cheerfulness, abstraction from the world with an enjoyment of its lawful 
gratifications. His extreme tenderness of conscience, was devoid of scrupulosity. His activity in good 
works was joined to habits of serious contemplation. His religious affections, which were highly spiri- 
tualized, exceeded not the limit of the most cautious sobriety, and were so far from impairing his natural 
affections, that they raised and purified them. Many sincere servants of Christ labour to attain heaven, 
but possess not any joyful hope of reaching it. Mr. Martyn could say, we are always confident where- 
fore we labour together with an assurance of His final and everlasting felicity. He had a dread of declen- 
sion and a fear of losing things he had wrought. He knew that the way to Heaven was narrow from 
the entrance to the end of it ; but he was persuaded that Christ was with him, walking in that way ; 
and that He would never leave him nor forsake him. 

‘‘A more perfect character,” says one who bore the burthen and heat of the day with him in India, 

“ I never met with, nor expect to see again on earth. During the four years we were fellow -labourers in 
this country, I had no less than six opportunities ot enjoying his company, and every opportunity only 
increased my love and veneration for him.” 

With respect to his labors, his own works praise him in the gates, far above human commendation. 
By his means, part of the Liturgy of the Church of England, the Parables and the whole of the New 
Testament, were translated into Hindostanee, a language spoken from Delhi to Cape Comorin, and 
intelligible to many millions of immortal souls. By him and by his means also the Psalms of David 
and the New Testament were rendered into Persian, the vernacular language of two hundred thousand 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


39 


who bear the Christian name, and became known over one-fourth of the habitable globe. By him, also, 
the imposture of the prophet of Mecca was daringly exposed and the truths of Christianity openly 
vindicated, in the very heart and centre of a Mahometan empire ! 

God however has not left Mr. Martyn without witness in the hearts of those who heard him in 
Europe and in Asia. Above forty adults and twenty children from the Hindoos, have received Christian 
baptism, all of whom, with the exception of a single individual, were converted by the instrumentality 
of one man, himself the fruit of Mr. Martyn’s ministry at Cawnpore. 

At Shiraz a sensation has been excited which it is trusted will not readily subside, and some Mahome- 
tans of consequence there have declared their conviction of the truth ot Christianity, a conviction 
which Mr. Martyn was the means of imparting to their minds. But when it is considered that the 
extension of the Scriptures in Hindostanee, are in wide circulation, who can ascertain the consequences 
which may have already followed, or foresee what may hereafter acrue ? So long as England shall be 
celebrated for that pure and apostolical Church of which Martyn was so great an ornament ; so long 
as India shall prize that which is more precious to her than all her gems and gold, the name of the 
subject of this memoir will not wholly be forgotten, and there will not be wanting those who will think 
of the humble and unfrequented grave of Henry Martyn, and be led to imitate those w r orks of mercy 
which have followed him into the world of light and love. 

The following simple tablet to the memory of Mr. Martyn is erected near the communion of the 
Mission Church of Calcutta. 

To the memory of 
The Rev. KCenry Martyn, 

Chaplain o^the Bengal Establishment. 

“ He was a burning- and a shining- light.” 

He died at Toeat in Armenia, 16th October 1812, aged only 32 ! 


THE REVEREND DAVID BROWN. 

The subject of this memoir was born in the East Riding of Yorkshire, and had, from early youth, im- 
bibed a serious and religious turn of mind, and was distinguished, among his connexions, for his amiable 
disposition and thirst for general and literary information. 

While on a journey, at about the 10th or 11th year of his age, he fell into the company of a minister 
whose attention was strongly attracted by his intelligent enquiries and remarks. Although a stranger, 
he could not refrain from informing himself what line of life was designed for the interesting youth. His 
parents answered, that as he evinced no great disposition to be employed on his father’s farm, they 
should probably bind him apprentice to some country tradesman, perhaps a druggist. The stranger 
replied, “ I think he is destined to a higher and more important profession ; and if you will entrust him 
with me for a year or two, I will give him the preparatory attention necessary to his passing through 
a grammar school, which may fit him for a College, and lead to his entering the Church.” The parents, 
struck with his liberal proposal, were soon induced to acquiesce, and young David resided under the 
private tuition of his new friend at Scarborough, till he removed to Hully, to attend the excellent public 
Grammar School, then under the care of the Rev. Joseph Milner. From this Mr. Brown proceeded 
to the University of Cambridge, and was entered at Magdalene College. Though much interrupted 
from severe illness, he prosecuted the usual studies, preparatory to entering the Church, but from which 
he was most unexpectedly called off by a remarkable and unforeseen offer made to him of going to 
India. 

Immediately on his arrival at Calcutta, in 1786, he found himself in a most responsible situation at 
the head of an extensive Orphan establishment, which demanded and received all his zeal, perseverence 
and affection. Within a few days of his arrival he was nominated Chaplain to a Brigade in Fort William ; 
the following year he superadded to these duties the charge -which he voluntarily undertook with the 
approbation of his brother chaplains, of the Mission Church. Thus did he work in the full tide of his 
strength, officiating at each of these distant points in succession, on every Sunday. 

On his appointment in 1794 to the Chaplaincy of the Presidency, his work became still more increased. 
He continued in charge of the Garrison and to officiate on Sundays, twice at the Mission, once at the 
garrison, and once at the Presidency Church, besides establishing a weekly lecture. 

During Mr. Brown’s ministry a remarkable change took place at that Church to which he was 
appointed. The attendance on Divine service there so greatly increased, that the Church-yard and 
even streets adjoining were regularly thronged with the palanquins and equipages of the congregation ; 
not because he was a popular preacher, or that his subjects or delivery were considered attractive • but 
because his consistent walk and conscientious earnestness finally prevailed, and he at length found that 
a Church had been built up of living stones, that a Godly people and loving holiness had arisen even 
in India. Whatever moral or political changes Asia may have undergone in the course of his period, 
his warning and encouraging voice was uninterruptedly heard in the Churches of Calcutta for 25 years! 
Thus were his faithful efforts crowned. It may be said of Mr. Brown, most literally, that he “ grew 
in grace and in the fear of the Lord.” He was exceedingly generous, and, at all times, hospitable. 
To comprise, in one view, his generous, varied efforts to do good, it ought to be recorded how unbounded 
was his liberality in expending largely on the Mission School building. In 1787, it was a clumsy 
unplastered brick edifice of small dimensions, choked up with old houses ; and from being of a reddish 
colour, had the appellation given to it by the natives of the “ Lall Greja,” under which name it conti- 
nues to be best known among them even at the present day. Within, it was exceedingly uncouth, with a 
brick pulpit built against a wall. Encouraged and assisted by the fine taste and scientific abilities of 
his respected friend Mr. W. Chamber, Mr. Brown was not long in improving and enlarging it His 
Missionary zeal was very great ; he laboured himself and aided Ministers and Missionaries both of the 
Church of England and other denominations. He extended generous aid, to a large amount , to the 


40 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


Missionaries of Serampore, for forwarding their general purposes ; as also more private assistance to 
individuals among them. From the pulpit he made two remarkably successful exertions ; one to 
establish a fund for the relief of all indigent objects, whether Europeans or natives, and one for the 
benefit of the Tamul Christians. This first effort made from the pulpit of the Established Church in 
India, on the subject of raising aid for native Christians, to supply them with the Scriptures in their 
own tongue, was followed up, the next year, by the lamented Henry Martyn ; and gave rise to the 
formation of the Auxiliary Bible Society, which was suggested and organized by Mr. Brown, and to 
which (as before to the original Bible Committee at Calcutta) he accepted the office of gratuitous Secre- 
tary. Another favourite pursuit which Mr. Brown had the happiness to see brought to bear by his 
exertions and become eminently useful, was a fund in aid of pious serious Ministers, to preach to the 
congregation of the Mission Church, since the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge desisted 
from supplying it. 

In 1812 he became dangerously ill; and truly there is no conveying an adequate idea of all he under- 
went in body and attempted in mind, during the long period of his sickness. At length he consented 
to go out to sea, as the indispensible and sole remaining remedy for the recovery of his health. It is 
less necessary to enter minutely on the distressing circumstances here. Suffice it to say, that the 
Indiaman in which he embarked for Madras struck on a sand in her passage down the bay. Thus the 
trial of a voyage and the favorable effects of the little sea air he did enjoy, were frustrated. He was 
brought back to Calcutta under most disadvantageous circumstances ; even to sleeping, exposed to 
the unsalutary night air on the open deck of the crowded schooner which conveyed him and the other 
passengers from the grounded vessel. This, together with the want of proper sustenance and comforts 
necessary to his reduced state, greatly increased his weakness. In a word, it pleased God that he 
should be brought back to the bosom of his family, and be surrounded by the objects of his tenderest 
love, when his spirit was called hence, lie was not again conveyed to his own abode, but was received 
under the hospitable roof of Mr. and Mrs. Harington at Chowringhee, with a view to his receiving the 
first medical attention under these disastrous occurrences. His holy habit of unreserved submission 
to the will of God, as marked by his providence, shone forth. He never uttered a repining sound 
that his reluctant and painful effort had been made in vain, but sincerely thought and declared, that 
all was well : even as much so as if the plan had 'succeeded, according to the wishes and the expecta- 
tions of his anxious friends for the restoration of his health and usefulness. His last morning was 
particularly calm, collected, and resigned ; and his last breath spoke thankfulness for the merciful 
consolations showered down upon him. While in the act of thus expressing his humble gratitude to 
God and man, he closed his eyes, and raised his feeble hands, and still moved his lips in inward wor- 
ship, but his voice was heard no more. 

His remains were interred in the old (south) Park Street Burying Ground, close to the gateway. The 
inscription over his tomb will be read in the usual place, and the following lines inscribed on a black 
Marble Tablet, will be seen in the old Church walls, the chief scene of his labours. 

To the poor the Gospel was preached in this Church 
by the Reverend David Brown, 

Twenty-five years. 

Obt. ap Calcutta 14 June 1812, ret. 49. 


(The following lines are inscribed on a black Marble Tablet: — ) 


In Memory of Charles Grant, Esq. 
late a Director of the Hon’ble E. I. Company, 

and formerly a Civil Servant of this Presidency ; who was distinguished by his unwearied zeal 
in promoting the cause of Religion in India, of which this Church, purchased at his 
expense, anil preserved for the service of God, is a proof and monument. 

He died in London October 31st A. D. 1823, Aged 78 Years. 


THE REVEREND THOMAS THOMASON. 

The Rev. Thomas Thomason was born at Plymouth on the 7th of June 1774, and until the 5th 
year of his age lived under the care of a mother, who within a year after his birth, became a widow. 
His father having died in the West Indies, his mother was doomed to shed the bitter tear of distress and 
desolation over the head of a fatherless child, whom it was her sole and anxious concern to nurse and 
educate. Circumstances affecting as these, rarely fail to heighten the reciprocations of fondness between 
parents and children : nor was this observation ever more fully verified than in the present instance. 

Having left Devonshire for London, four years after her bereavement, Mrs. Thomason placed her son 
in a school at Greenwich, under the superintendence of Mr. Bakewell. There, to adopt her own words 
“ The affectionate care of one of the tutors over the spiritual instruction of one who was my world of 
happiness, was beyond all praise.” For some time, nothing appeared in this boy beyond sweetness 
of temper, quickness of apprehension, docility and diligence. In his ninth year a marked blessing 
descended on his tutor’s unremitting exertions, and he began to shew so much spirituality of feeling, 
and such decision of character, as to constitute this a distinct era in his life. Frequent questions on 
the Scriptures and applications of them to mankind and to herself, did show that the seed of real 
religion did not lie merely upon the surface of his mind, but had become radicated in his affections. 

At the age of thirteen he was engaged as a tutor at Deptford. In this employment he continued 
till midsummer of 1789 ; when, being a proficient in the French tongue, and Dr. Coke wanting an inter- 
preter in that language, he was persuaded to accompany the Doctor, in that capacity, to° the West 
Indies. Soon after his return from the West, he. became known to a lady of the name of Thornton. 
Her affection for him was almost maternal. At Elland in Yorkshire, a Society existed, (it still lives 
and is vigorous in well doing ;) the sole object of which was, the highly important one of spreading 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


41 


a fostering wing over those aspirants to the ministry of the Church of England whose means were not 
sufficient to enable them to take the necessary degree at the University. By the advice of Mr. Thorn- 
ton, application was now made to this Institution. The late Rev. Henry Foster and the Rev. Richard 
Cecil were deputed by the Directors of the Elland fund, to examine the pretensions of the young man 
who now presented himself before them ; the period of suspense between the report of the examiners, 
and the determination of the Society for some unexplained cause, lasted long. It was not till the 
spring of 1791, that, after an interview with one of the Directors of the Elland Institution, his final ac- 
ceptance was signified. “ I am . accepted,” he writes to his mother March 18, 1791 ; “ no doubt your 
heart overflows with gratitude ; I am sure, mine does ; Mr. Atkins is quite a father to me ; the kindness 
I have experienced in Leeds far eclipses all other favors : Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is 
within me, bless His Holy name.” A clergyman of the name of Clark, of Chesham in Buckingham- 
shire, at the recommendation of the Elland Society, who were to pay simply for his board, agreed to 
instruct him without any remuneration. For this task he was well qualified. At the moment of his 
departure from Chesham for Cambridge, joy at the prospect then opening before him, was absorbed in 
grief at quitting the abode of his incomparable tutor. “ Curnec facilitas auctoritatem nec gravit as 
amorem diminuit.” At the close of the year 1798, Mr. Thomason was ordained a Presbyter in the 
Church of England by Dr. Cornwallis, Bishop of Lichfield. 

In 1808, Mr. Thomason was appointed as a Chaplain at Calcutta, and left Portsmouth June 10, 
and arrived at Calcutta on the 19th November, after experiencing a narrow escape from the shipwreck 
of the vessel in which he had taken his passage. The second Sunday after landing at Calcutta, Mr. 
Thomason commenced his ministry at the Old Church, from the text, “ Knowing the terrors of the 
Lord, we persuade men.” 

So favourably had Mr. Thomason’s labours been received, that before the lapse of six months, it was 
expedient to enlarge his church. For the greater part of two years Mr. Thomason was almost as 
strong to labour in India as in England ; but the second hot season made a sensible impression on his 
health, when he began to droop so much, that he was compelled to suspend his ministerial duties for 
six weeks, and betake himself to a pinnace for a trip on the river. While Mr. Thomason was seeking 
restoration of strength from the breezes on the Hooghly, he had heard that Mr. H. Martyn arrived at 
Calcutta very ill, and was going to sea for his health ; this news brought Mr. Thomason back. The 
years 1812 and 1813 were, to Mr. Thomason, years of mourning beyond experience or expression; 
sorrow upon sorrow rolled on him — (the deaths of Mr. Brown and Mr. Martyn). From the period of 
Mr. Brown’s death to the close of the succeeding year, when Mr. Thomason obtained, after countless 
difficulties, an assistant in his Church, his labours were unusually great. Besides pastoral concerns, 
he was engaged in revising the Arabic version of the Scriptures and Martyn’s Hindoostani New Testa- 
ment. He executed also, at the desire of the Government, the duties of Examiner in Arabic in the 
College of Fort William ; and as if this were not enough, was preparing further work for himself, by 
inviting the Church Missionary Society to place two Missionaries under his instruction (gratuitously) 
in Oriental literature. But the project, which of all others lay nearest his heart, was the establishment 
of native schools, and as a preparatory step, a school for School-masters. 

At this time, in the middle of October 1813, the Earl of Moira arrived at Fort William, and after a 
short period, began to attend the Mission Church, notwithstanding its unfashionable character, and 
appointed its ministers to perform stated service at Barrackpore ; he fixed upon him also to accompany 
him as Chaplain in a journey of state through the provinces ; and as a yet further proof of the manner 
in which he appreciated his talents and judgment, commissioned him in the early part of 1814, to draw 
up and submit to the Government a plan for the education of the Indian population. He granted 
permission likewise to Mr. Thomason to have the labours of his assistant made permanent, a measure 
which he more highly prized, than any personal favour in the power of the Governor General to grant. 

The expedition of the Governor General through British India commenced, and Mr. Thomason 
accompanied him ; but it was not long after entering upon the second part of this expedition that Mr. 
Thomason’s zeal, fidelity and boldness, as well as his wisdom and discretion, were signally put to the 
proof. He soon discovered, to his sorrow, that the Governor General, when travelling, paid no regard 
to the Christian sabbath, As his Chaplain, therefore, he deemed it incumbent on him to notice this 
violation of the day of rest ; perceiving however, when he had hoped his suggestions had been attended to, 
and his object attained, that arrangements were making on the Saturday for moving the next day, his 
conscience told him that he should be wanting in allegiance to the Lord of the sabbath, if yielding to 
natural inclinations, he offered no remonstrance. Painful as the measure was, he hesitated not to adopt 
it. The reply was his dismissal from the Camp. The rigour of this stern and haughty mandate was 
indeed tempered by an intimation from the Secretary that an apology would be accepted. To apologize 
when in error was congenial to Mr. Thomason’s conciliating disposition ; but in this case, apology was 
out of the question — yet, as explanation was both admissable and becoming, he instantly wrote to the 
Governor General, expressing his surprize at this order, but his readiness at the same time to comply 
with it, adding, that he felt as strongly as ever, the importance of the subject, and thought it the duty 
of a minister of religion to remonstrate where its interests were concerned ; but he lamented that any 
thing should have appeared in the expression of his sentiments that was thought disrespectful. The 
Governor General was satisfied, and, for a time, respect was paid to the sabbath day. 

Mr. Thomason’s return to his flock in 1815 was an event of mutual joy to himself and them. 

In January 1824 he was fixed in the Cathedral. The autumn of this year was remarkable for an 
i epidemic of a singular character : it raged in Calcutta, and Mr. Thomason was one of those who suffered 
tfrom its violence. 

In the year 1825, he determined, on account of Mrs. Thomason’s health, which was declining, and 
i in hopes of her restoration, to return to England ; accordingly in the month of October his passage 
' was engaged. Like many events that occur in life, varied by the strongest light and shades, on his 
•arrival in England to his great joy he found a mother ; but to his indescribable anguish, he had lost a 

G 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


42 

wife, who breathed her last on the 24th of March, 1820. In June 1828, he left England, and in little 
more than 4 months, re-entered the scene of his Indian labours. But it was suffering and death, 
not life and action, that the Lord, whose ways are not as men’s ways, appointed. Almost ever since his 
arrival, he had been under medical treatment, and therefore it proved absolutely necessary that he 
should seek restoration by change of climate. A ship being about to sail for the Mauritius, preparations 
were made, without loss of time, and he took his passage down the river. The voyage to the Mauritius 
proved beneficial, but when the anchor was dropped at Port Louis, J une 7 th, which proved to be his birth- 
day, alarms and fears greatly exceeded favourable expectations, and on Sunday, June 22d, twelve days 
after landing in the Isle of France, his earthly tabernacle was dissolved, and his spirit numbered 
amongst the just made perfect. Thus fell a great man in Israel. For sweetness of temper and simplicity 
of spirit, he was distinguished ; there was not a shadow of guile or of artifice in him ; hilarity and 
cordiality of feeling one generally found ; in this combination they were so in him. Apathy did not chill 
his affections nor did gloom ever settle upon his mind ; generosity was the very sunshine of his soul. 
He fed those committed to his charge with that bread of life, which was the daily sustenance and 
refreshment of his own soul. 


(The following is the Inscription placed to his Memory in the Old Church .) 

To the Memory of 

The Rev. T. T. Thomason, M.A. 

This tablet was erected by a grateful and affectionate people, 
in remembrance of his long and faithful Ministry. 

He died at the Mauritius 22d June 1829, aged 55 years. 


(The following Inscription is to he seen on the North of the Communion Table : — ) 

To the Memory of 

Tire Rev, R. 33. Boyes, A.B. Chaplain, 
who after faithfully laboring for ten years in 
the Lord’s Service, in this Church, fell asleep in Jesus, 
on the 10th of December 1841, in the 38th year of his age. 

«< Mark the perfect man, and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace.”— Ps. xxxvii. 37. 


THE REV. R. B. BOYES, A. B. — (His Christian character and peaceful end.) 

In reference to the former, his character, you will see the perfect and upright man as described, 
whether you regard him in his private Christian character or as a minister of the sanctuary. 

As a private Christian there was all that constituted the character whose end is peace ; he had all 
those elements which compose the perfect and devout man, although it was not until he had attained to 
man’s estate that his mind was enlightened to see the necessity of that great change which constitutes 
this character, and which the Scriptures represent under the idea of “ a new birth,” “ a resurrection 
from death to life,” yet when that light was vouchsafed it was the Holy Spirit’s own work, and it was 
complete and entire. His faith in Christ was exclusive of all other ground of trust. His simple aim was 
that “ he might be found in Christ this was all his salvation and all his desire ; his love to the Saviour 
was manifest to all, both in his word and actions ; his zeal for the glory of Christ, and the promotion of 
his cause in the world were the objects of his constant prayers and efforts, and his obedience was 
evident by his holy life, and conversation before all men. He was a truly good man, and has left an 
example both in his principles and practice worthy of attention. His spirit, his life, his conduct, were 
those of an upright Christian ; he was remarkable for a spirit of kindness, meekness, gentleness, and 
amiability ; they were exemplified in the whole deportment. His religion thus presented more of the 
attractive and lovely, and if he did not manifest so much as others the ardent, and enterprizing spirit, 
he showed more of the mind which is clothed with humility. If he had not the untiring zeal which 
overcomes all obstacles, he had the spirit of love, and was decked with the ornament of a meek and 
quiet spirit. He copied the gentleness of St. John rather than the valour of St. Paul. 

He was in a word, a man of God, a living epistle of the truth, known and read of all men ; he adorned 
the doctrines of God his Saviour in all things, and he has left behind a reputation not only that is 
blameless, but that is praiseworthy and of good report, but it is to be remembered that it" was the 
exemplification of Christian faith. 

His character as a minister of the sanctuary will be found the same upright and conscientious indi- 
vidual, anxious only to fulfil his ministry so as to be the means of “ saving himself and those who heard 
him.” 

The doctrines which he taught were strictly spiritual ; he drew all his instructions from God’s blessed 
word ; he constantly insisted upon those great and leading truths which that word exhibits, and ail his 
instructions were marked by their evangelical character ; whatever the subject on which he dwelt Christ 
was all. If he preached repentance it was that which was available through Christ ; if he set forth 
the beauty and excellency of the law, it was to direct men to Christ as the only ground of pardon for 
having broken it, or of strength to enable them to fulfil it. His labours in the pulpit were marked by 
fidelity. He adapted his discourses to the different classes of his hearers ; he kept back nothing as far as 
he knew that might be profitable to them who heard him. 

His firm attachment to the Church was unmixed with any bigotry ; he loved his Master’s image 
wherever it was to be traced ; whilst thoroughly persuaded in his own mind of the rectitude of his own 
opinions, he would have trembled to have condemned a fellow Christian who loved the Saviour because 
he followed not in the same path with himself. In his preparation for the pulpit he was most diligent 
and laborious, they have been lucid in their arrangement and forcible in their application, they have also 
been attended in their delivery with so much of hallowed and devout feeling, that they could not but 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 43 

leave the impression that they had been composed with earnest and fervent prayer to God, as well as 
arduous study. 

His sabbath mornings were spent in prayer to God that he would pour out his Holy Spirit upon the 
Ministers and congregations, that should that day assemble for worship throughout the world. He rose 
earlier on that day than usual, for the purpose of securing more time for this sacred work, and effects of 
such devotional spirit have often been evident to the congregation in the subsequent services of the 
sanctuary. But it was in his pastoral visits that he was eminently useful, His flock was the object of his 
care and compassion, many of whom will remember his affectionate visits ; they will not forget how 
desirous he ever was to serve them, to promote their spiritual interests, to sympathize with them in their 
troubles, to console them in their sorrows, to advise them in their difficulties and to aid them by all means 
in his power. His affection for the young people of his congregation was very great ; the instructions 
which he imparted to them were of the most important nature. How often has he told them that happi- 
ness was only to be found in religion, and now he has sealed the truth of his instructions by his own 
dying testimony. 

Such was the character of this good man and minister ; a faithful labourer in his Master’s vineyard. 
He was at his labours almost to the last, and the closing scene of his days was attended with peace and 
even joy ; it was indeed an end that we might justly covet ; it has also left an impression of the triumph 
of Christian principles over death and the grave. His end was emphatically peace. The Rev. Mr. 
Boyes for several hours had the impression that the sickness would be unto death, yet he neglected no 
means which might conduce to his recovery. 

To a friend who entered the room and sat by his couch, he said, “ I have nothing to do.” It is a 
somewhat singular coincidence that the above words are the words uttered on a similar occasion by 
that eminent saint and devoted servant of God, the Rev. David Brown ; he said also on his death-bed 
“ I have nothing to do now,” meaning that his interest in the covenant had been secured before the 
arm of death arrested him. 

The night before his departure several sentences escaped him worthy to be engraven on the rock ; 
he spoke of the precious hours he had spent in the old Church ; of the deeply rooted affection he had 
for this house of God and its sacraments and ordinances. 4 Yes,’ he said, 4 1 have loved and enjoyed them,’ 
and added, 4 Thine earthly temples Lord I love’ but there is a nobler house above,’ he referred to the 
beautiful passage 4 The eternal God is thy refuge and underneath are the everlasting arms. — Deut. xxxiii. 
27. He said 4 that is what Moses experienced, and how can I sink when I am so supported.’ When his 
beloved and now bereaved wife came to him about five o’clock in the morning before his death, he said 
in his most affectionate manner, 4 1 have but one request to ask of my God, that you my dear Mary and 
our dear children, and you my friend and our beloved congregation, may be simply the Saviour’s.' 
Almost his last words before the body became too weak for the immortal part to act upon ; as the 
medium of its communication, were two sentences, one of tender concern for the comfort of his wife on 
her voyage home, and another with regard to the grand foundation on which his faith and hope were 
built : 4 what a precious doctrine,’ he said, 4 is the atonement made by our Lord Jesus Christ ; there is no 
other system that can sustain and support a penitent sinner but this can, and does sustain ; I know it 
does.’ 

O never was Jordon’s streams crossed in a narrower spot ; it was almost forded ; and never was a 
calmer gentler spirit supported across its streams ; it was a scene not only of peace, but of triumph. 
His remains were interred in the Mission Burial Ground and his Inscription will be found amongst 
those under that head. 


(The following Inscriptions are copied from Tablets erected in the Old Church walls : — ) 

T his tribute of affection is raised by the Christian community of this Presidency, 
to the Memory of the Right Rev. Daniel Corrie, L.L.D. 
late Lord Bishop of Madras, and formerly Archdeacon of Calcutta : 

The friend and fellow-laboui'er of Henry Martyn. 

1 he beloved Prelate, died at Madras on the 5th day of February 1837, 

In the 59th year of his age, and the second of his Episcopate. 

“ They rest from their labours, and their works do follow them.” 


To the Memory of Henry Davenport Sliakespear, 

who after thirty-five years of useful and honorable service, 

Died on the 20th day of March 1838, 

A member of the Council of India. 

In token of respect for his public conduct, 
which was conscientious, just, moderate and humane ; 
of admiration, of the modesty, gentleness, sincerity and piety, 
which adorned his private life; and in grateful remembrance of long and unbroken kindness, this Monu- 
ment is erected by the friends who lament his loss, and cherish the recollection of his virtues. 


This Marble is dedicated by the Trustees of the Old Church, 
to the Memory of George Udny, Esq. 
late of the Honorable Company’s Bengal Civil Service, 
and many years a member of this congregation ; whose exertions in the causeof religion generally, 
and in the circulation of the Holy Scriptures particularly, 
have well entitled him to this token of grateful remembrance. 

He died in Calcutta, October 24, A. D. 1830, in the 70th year of his age. 

g 2 


44 


OLD, OR MISSION CHURCH. 


In Memory of G. S. Hutteman, Esq. 

who through a long life, bore a consistent testimony to the truth as it is in Jesua. 

He was born November 10, 1769, Died July 8, 1843. 

" Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age, like as a shock of corn cometh in his season.” — Job v. 26. 

This tablet was raised by the Trustees 

of the Evangelical Fund, connected with this Church, of which Mr. Hutteman was the oldest member. 


To the Memory of Robert Swinhoe, 

late Worshipful Master of Lodge St. John, No. 715, of Calcutta, 
who endeavoured to walk humbly as a Christian, and was as such respected. 
This tablet is erected by his sorrowing brethren, 
in token of their affectionate regard in the friend and brother ; 
whom living they loved, and whose loss they deplore. 
yEtat 47. Obiit 17th of February 1845. 


Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 
the beloved wife of Joseph Graham, Esq. 50th Regiment N. I. 
who died at sea, on board the “ Lady Nugent,” 25th of November 1829, aged 30 years. 


In Memory of Mary Elizabeth Murray, 

who died 23d of August 1845, aged 22 years. 
“ She is not dead but sleepeth.” 


In Memory of 

The Rev. 'Walter Hovenden, B.D. 

late Chaplain and Secretary to the Bengal Military Orphan Institution ; 

He died at the Sand heads, on board the “ Sea Horse,” Pilot Vessel, on the 30th of September 1832 ; 

In the 49th year of his age. 

“ And the sea gave up the dead which were in it.”— Rev. xx. 13 v. 


Mr. Hovenden was the son of Colonel Hovenden of his Majesty’s service. He was born at Wolver- 
hampton in Staffordshire and (it is believed) educated at a school in that county. His father, Colonel 
Hovenden, was descended from an ancient English family ; the celebrated Historian, Roger De Hovenden, 
who flourished in the reign of Henry the 2nd, was a collateral ancestor. At the early age of 13 Mr. 
Hovenden held an Ensign’s commission in his Majesty’s service ; about the age of 15 he joined his 
Regiment then in Holland, and served under the Duke of York till the troops employed in that ex- 
pedition returned to England. After passing through the rank of Lieutenant, he served for about three 
years in the Mediterranean as a Captain of Marines, and subsequently embarked with his Regiment 
for Madras, where he soon obtained a majority and also the command of his Regiment, the 38th foot, 
he being the Senior officer present with the Corps. 

Ill health induced Major Hovenden after his return to Europe to dispose of his Commission ; Iris 
health becoming re-established, and being of an active mind, he went over to Ireland and resided for 
some time, on an estate belonging to the family, where he was put in the Commission of the peace and 
acted as a country Magistrate. 

His mind taking a religious turn, he directed his views towards the Church, returned to England, 
and entered himself at St. Peter’s College, Cambridge; after receiving orders, he officiated as a Curate of 
a parish in the vicinity of Birmingham, till he obtained his appointment from the Court of Directors, 
of Chaplain and Secretary to the Lower, or Government Orphan School, and the same appointment to 
the Kidderpore Schools from the Committee of the Military Orphan Society in London. 

Mr. Hovenden’s career in India, as a Clergyman and a gentleman, and in his official capacity, must 
be fresh in the recollection of most Europeans of any standing in Calcutta. To the higher classes, 
his courteous manners rendered his company highly acceptable ; bis kindness and benevolence procured 
him the love and esteem of all who had intercourse with him, 

Mr. Hovenden received his Diploma of Bachelor of Divinity from the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

— . “ Weep no more, 

For Lycidas as your sorrow is not dead, 

Sunk though he be beneath the watery floor ; 

So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed. 

And yet anon repairs his drooping head, 

And tricks his beams, and with new spangled ore 
Flames in the forehead of the morning sky. 

So Lycidas sunk low, but mounted high 

Through the dear might of Him that walk’d the waves, 

Where other groves and other streams along, 

With nectar pure his oozy locks he laves 
And hears the unexpressive nuptial song 
In the blessed kingdoms meek of Joy and Love, 

There entertain him all the saints above 
In solemn troops and sweet societies, 

That sing, and singing in their glory more 
And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes.” 


Milton. 


THE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAH. 


45 


MRS. BROWN. 

This pious and simple-hearted Christian, known to many in India, was taken to her rest in the 6/tb 
year of her age, on Sunday evening the 24th of April 1842. She had been one of the most regular and 
constant attendants in the Old Church for at least a quarter of a century. Like Dorcas, she was better 
known by the effects of her faith, “ the good works and alms deeds which she did,” than by any 
external professions of it. She shewed her love to the Gospel, by her affection to its faithful ministers, 
and to all who love our Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity and truth ; by her attachment to God’s house 
and ordinances, which she never omitted to attend three times in the week, unless prevented by sick- 
ness, — by her unostentatious but widely extended benevolence, — by a consistent walk and blameless 
life. She seemed to answer to St. Paul’s description of a widow indeed that trusted in God and 
deserved honor of his Church: — “One who had been the faithful wife, well-reported ot tor good 
works, having lodged strangers, having washed the saints’ feet, having relieved the afflicted, having 
diligently followed every good work.” 

The expression of her hope in Christ and his precious promises, in her last hours, was very diffident 
and humble ; but it was on the right foundation, and that, through the grace ot her Saviour, she has 
entered into Paradise. 

In affectionate remembrance of Mrs. Mary Brown, widow, 

Wow died April 24th, 1842, aged 76. 

“ An Israelite indeed, in whom was no guile.” 


In Memory of Charlotte Vaughan, 

the beloved wife of the Rev. J. Vaughan, Chaplain. 
Nat. 28th May 1823, Ob. September 6, 1842. 


MRS. VAUGHAN. 

This estimable lady expired at sea on her way to Penang, whither she was going for the benefit of 
her health, on the 6th September 1842, and was committed to the deep on the day following. She 
rested on the promises of God; found peculiar consolation in Matt. xi. 28. She was naturally a most 
gentle being, and grace refined her character. The Lord led her into the wilderness and there spake 
comfortably to her. The last question a Christian friend put to •her before she left Calcutta was, 
‘ D§ you feel the Lord gracious ?’ She replied with animation, ‘ yes, and more and more so every day.’ 
By her loss the Church has been deprived of one of its members in the midst of her days, and an addi- 
tional proof been furnished of the power of Christianity to sustain its possesser while crossing the 
valley of the shadow of Death. 


THE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAH. 

(The late Monument on the North-West angle of Tank Square, which was erected in commemora- 
tion of the horrible event and removed in 1819, had the following Inscription engraven on it : — ) 

To the Memorys of 

Edioard Eyre and William Baillie, Esqs . ; the Rev. Jervas Bellamy ; 

Messrs. Jenhs, Reevely, Law, Coates, Nahcourt, Jebb, Torriano, E. Rage, 

S, Page, Grub, Street, liarod, P. Johnstone, Bullard, N. Drake, Carse, 

Knapton, Gosling, Dod and Dalrymple ; Captains Clayton, Buchanan and 
Witherington ; Lieutenants Bishop, Hays, Blugg, Simpson and J. Bellamy ; 

Ensigns Paccard, Scott, Hastings, C ■ Wedderburn and Dumbleton ; Sea Captains 
Hunt, Osburn and Purnell; Messrs. Carey, Leech, Steavenson, Guy, Porter, 

Parker, Caulker, Bendal, and Atkinson; 

Who, with sundry other inhabitants, Military and Militia, to the number of 123 persons, 

were by the tyrannic violence of 

Suraj-ud-Dowlah, Suba of Bengal, 

Suffocated in the Black Hole prison of Fort William, on the night of the 20th day of June 1756, 
and promiscuously thrown the succeeding morning into the Ditch of the ravelin of this place. 

This Monument is erected by their surviving fellow-sufferer, 

J. Z. Holwell. 

This horid act of violence was as amply as deservedly revenged on Suraj-ud-Dowla, 
by his Majesty’s arms, under the conduct of Vice Admiral Watson and Colonel Clive, Anno 1757. 


PARTICULARS OF THE ABOVE EVENT. 

“ At five the Nabob entered the Fort, accompanied by his General, Meer Jaffier, and most of the 
principal officers of his Army. He immediately ordered Omichund and Kissendass to be brought 
before him, and received them with civility, and having bid some officers to go and take possession of 
the Company s treasury, he proceeded to the principal apartment of the factory, where he sat in state 
and received the compliments of his Court and attendants in magnificent expressions of his prowess and 
good fortune. Soon after he sent for Air. Holwell, to whom he expressed much resentment at the 
presumption of the English in daring to defend the Fort, and much dissatisfaction at the smallness 


46 


TIIE CRUELTIES OF SURAJ-UD-DOWLAII. 


of the sum found in the Treasury, which did not exceed 50,000 Rupees. Mr. Holwell had two other 
conferences with him on this subject before seven o’clock, when theNobab dismissed him, with repeated 
assurances on the word of a soldier that he should suffer no harm. 

“ Mr. Holwell, returning to his unfortnnate companions, found them assembled, and surrounded by 
a strong guard. Several buildings on the North and South sides of the Fort were already in flames, 
which approached with so thick a smoke on either hand, that the prisoners imagined their enemies 
had caused this conflagration in order to suffocate them between the two fires. On each side of the 
Eastern gate of the Fort extended a range of chambers adjoining to the curtain, and before the chambers, 
a verandah, or open gallery ; it was of arched masonry and intended to shelter the soldiers from the 
sun and rain, but, being low, almost totally obstructed the chambers behind from the light and air , 
and whilst some of the guard were looking in other parts of the factory for proper places to confine the 
prisoners during the night, the rest ordered them to assemble in ranks under the verandah on the right 
hand of the gateway, where they remained for some time with so little suspicion of their impending 
fate, that they laughed among themselves at the seeming oddity of this disposition, and amused them- 
selves with conjecturing what they should next be ordered to do. About eight o’clock those who had 
been sent to examine the rooms reported that they found none fit for the purpose, on which the prin- 
cipal officer commanded the prisoners to go into one of the rooms which stood behind them along 
the verandah. 

It was the common dungeon of the Garrison, who used to call it the Black Hole * Many of the 
prisoners knowing the place, began to expostulate, upon which the officer ordered his men to cut dowm 
those who hesitated, on which the prisoners obeyed. But before all were within, the room was so 
thronged that the last entered with difficulty, the guard immediately closed and locked the door, con- 
fining 146 persons in a room not twenty feet square, with only two small windows, and these obstructed 
by the verandah. 

It was the hottest season of the year and the night uncommonly sultry even at this season ; the 
excessive pressure of their bodies against one another and the intolerable heat which prevailed as soon 
as the door was shut, convinced the prisoners that it was impossible to live through the night in this 
horrible confinement, and violent attempts were immediately made to force the door, but without effect, 
for it opened inward, on which many began to give a loose to rage. Mr. Holwell, who had placed him- 
self at one of the windows, exhorted them to remain composed both in body and mind, as the only 
means of surviving the night, and his remonstrances produced a short interval of quiet, during which 
he applied to an old Jemadar, who bore some marks of humanity in his countenance, promising to 
give him a thousand Rupees in the •morning if he would separate the prisoners into two chambers ; the 
old man went to try, but returning in a few minutes, said it was impossible, when Mr. Holwell 
offered him a larger sum, on which he retired once more and returned with the fatal sentence, that no 
relief could be expected, because “ the Nabob was asleep, and no one dared to wake him.” 

“ In the meantime every minute had inreased their sufferings ; the first effect of their confinement 
was a profuse and continued sweat, which soon produced intolerable thirst, succeeded by excruciating 
pains in the breast, with difficulty of breathing, little short of suffocation. Various means were tried to 
obtain more room and air. Every one stripped off his clothes, every hat was put in motion, and 
these methods affording no relief it was proposed that they should all sit down on their hands at the 
same time, and after remaining a little while in this posture rise all together. This fatal expedient was 
thrice repeated before they had been confined an hour, and every time several unable to rear them- 
selves again fell and were trampled to death by their companious. Attempts were again made to force 
the door, which failing as before, redoubled their rage, but the thirst increasing, nothing but ‘ water ! 
water !’ became soon after the general cry. The good Jemadar immediately ordered some skins of 
water to be brought to the windows, but, instead of relief his benevolence became a more dreadful 
cause of destruction, for the sight of the water threw every one into such excessive agitations and 
ravings, that unable to resist this violent impulse of nature, none could wait to be regularly served, 
but each with the utmost ferocity battled against those who were likely to get it before him, and in 
these conflicts many were either pressed to death by the efforts of others or suffocated by their own. 
This scene, instead of producing compassion in the guard without, only excited their mirth, and they 
held up lights to the bars in order to have the diabolical satisfaction of viewing the deplorable conten- 
tions of the sufferers within, who finding it impossible to get any water whilst it was thus furiously 
disputed, at length suffered those who were nearest to the windows to convey it in their hats to those be- 
hind them. It proved no relief either to their thirst or other sufferings, for the fever increased every 
moment with the increasing depravity of the air in the dungeon, which had been so often respired, and 
was saturated with the hot and deleterious effluvia of putrifying bodies ; of which the stench was little, 
less than mortal. Before midnight, all who were alive, and had not partaken of the air at the windows, 
were either in a lethargic stupefaction, or raving with delirium. Every kind of invective and abuse 
was uttered by some, in hopes of provoking the guard to put an end to their miseries, by firing into 
the dungeon ; whilst Heaven was implored by others with wild and incoherent prayers ; until the 
weaker, exhausted by these agitations, at length laid down quietly, and expired on the bodies of their 
dead or agonizing friends. Those who still survived in the inward part of the dungeon, finding that 
the water had afforded them no relief, made efforts to obtain air, by endeavouring to scramble over the 
heads of those who stood between them and the windows, whilst the utmost strength of every one was 
employed for two hours, either in maintaining his own ground, or in endeavouring to get that of which 
others were in possession. All regards of compassion and affection were lost, and no one would recede 
or give way for the relief of another. Faintness sometimes gave short pauses of quiet, but the first 
motion of any one renewed the struggle through all, under which, ever and anon, some one sunk to 


* This Cell, commonly known as the Black Hole, was pulled down in 1819 to make room for the New 
Custom House. 


47 


RIGHT HON'BLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. 

rise no more. At two o’clock not more than fifty remained alive, but even this numbei was too many 
to partake of the saving air, the contest for which, and life, continued until the morn, ong imp me , 
began to break ; and, with the hope of relief, gave a few survivers a view of the dead. J lie survivors 
then at the window finding that their entreaties could not prevail on the guard to open the tool, i. 
occurred to Mr. Cooke, the Secretary of the Council, that Mr. H dwell, it alive, might have moie in- 
fluence to obtain their relief, and two of the company undertaking the search, discovered him, having 
still some signs of life ; but when they brought him towards the window, every one refused to quit Ins 
place excepting Captain Mills* who, with rare generosity, offered to resign his, on winch the rest 
likewise agreed to make room. He had scarcely begun to recover Ins senses, before an officer sent by 
the Nabob came and enquired if the English Chief survived ; and soon after, the same man returned 
with an order to open the prison. The dead were so thronged, and the survivors had so little strength 
remaining, that they were employed near half an hour in removing the bodies which lay against the 
door before they could clear a passage to go out one at a time ; when of one hundred and forty-six 
who went in, no more than twenty-three came out alive. The Nabob’s troops beheld them, and the 
hovock of death from which they had escaped, with indifference ; but did not prevent them rom 
removing to a distance, and were immediately obliged by the intolerable stench, to clear the dungeon, 
whilst others dug a ditch on the outside of the Fort, into which all the dead bodies were promiscuous y 
thrown. 

“ Mr. Holwell unable to stand, was, soon after, carried to the Nabob, who was so far from showing 
any compassion for his condition, or remorse for the death of the other prisoners, that he only talked 
of the Treasure which the English had buried ; and, threatening him with further injuries if he per sisted 
in concealing them, ordered him to be kept a prisoner. The officers to whose charge he was delivere 
put him into fetters, together with Messrs. Court and Walcot, who were likewise supposed to know 
something of the Treasure ; the rest of the survivors, among whom were Messrs. Cooke and Mills, 
were told they might go where they pleased ; the dread of remaining any longer within the leach of 
such barbarians, determined most of them to remove immediately, as tar as their strength enabled them, 
from the Fort, and most tended towards the vessels, which were still in sight ; but when they leached 
Govindpore, in the southern part of the Company’s bounds, they were informed that guards were 
stationed to prevent any persons from passing to the vessels ; on which most of them took shelter in 
deserted huts, where some of the natives, wdio had served the English in different employments, came 
and administered to their immediate w r ants. Two or three, however, ventured, and got to the vessels 
before sunset. Their appearance, and the dreadful tale they had to tell, w T ere the severest of reproaches 
to those on board, w T ho intent only on their own preservation, had made no efforts to facilitate the 
escape of the rest of the garrison; never, perhaps, was such an opportunity ot performing an heroic 
action so ignominiously neglected ; for a single sloop, with fifteen brave men on board, might, in spite 
of all the efforts of the enemy, have come up, and, anchoring under the Fort, have carried away all 
who suffered in the Dungeon.” 

On the first of January 1757, Calcutta was retaken by Admiral Watson, "f and Colonel Clive, and on 
the 20th June, Suraj-ud-doulah was defeated at Plassey, and, the beginning of the following month was 
assassinated by order of the son of his successor, in the 20th year of his age. 

(Fragment on the above.) 

That cell, erewhile the dungeon of despair, 

And death and horror it was thine to see ; 

How many English captives perished there, 

While the young tyrant slept, and breathed unpoisoned air 
But vengence was not slow ; the haughty Chief 
Shone like a meteor flash, portentous, bright ; 

He had his hundred days, sanguine and brief, 

His triumph and his fall. The transient might 
Which clothed his arm soon withered in the fight, 

And Plassey, echoing with the cannon’s roar, 

Saw Clive victorious, and the Tyrant’s flight. 

Crushed by avenging power, he rose no more 
But fell by kindred hands, wild, weltering in his gore. 


RIGHT HON’BLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. (Late Governor General of 
Bengal , and a Member of his Majesty's Most Honourable the Privy Council.) 

Warren Hastings, the son of an obscure clergyman, and a man destined alike by nature and by 
fortune, to produce no inconsiderable effect on the fate of Asia, as well as of England, was born in 
1733, A. D. The precise spot where he first saw the light, is unknown to the writer of this article ; 
but it could not have been at Daylesford House, as has been supposed, this mansion having been sold 
full eighteen years before, by one of his progenitors. Certain it is, however, that he passed part of 
his infancy in that neighbourhood, and had imbibed such an attachment to the spot, that he never was 
happy until he had become the possessor. 

The period that elapsed between his birth and his employment in a public capacity, was so exceed- 
ingly short as to afford but few materials for biography. That his parents were not in great affluence 
may be readily conjectured, when it is recollected, that the remainder of the family estate had been 
recently disposed of ; and yet, on the other hand, his maintenance and education for several years at a 
great public school, followed by a respectable appointment in the service of the East India Company, 
at the moment he was enabled by law to fulfil its duties, would seem to infer no deficiency either of 
substance or connections. 


* Who afterwards died in England in 1811. 
f Who died in Calcutta on the 16th August 1757, (see page 4.) 


48 


RIGHT HON’BLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. 


He came out in the Civil Service in 1749, at the age of eighteen, and immediately began to study 
the languages and the politics of the country with great diligence. In 1757, though then only twenty- 
six years of qge, he was appointed by Clive Resident at the Durbar at Morshedabad. This was at the 
time the most important post, next to that of the Governor himself. When Mr. Vansittart succeeded 
to the chair in Calcutta, Mr. Hastings was the only man in whom he put any confidence. In Decem- 
ber 1761, Mr. Hastings came into Council in Calcutta, and alone supported Mr. Vansittart against the 
opposition of the other Members. He was uncorrupted amidst the general depravity. While his 
colleagues were making large fortunes by pulling down one Nabob and setting up another, he was ne- 
ver suspected of having received any thing. Indeed, when he was going home with his friend Vansit- 
tart in 1765, he was so poor that he was obliged to borrow of strangers a small sum of money which his 
own agent, Khoja Petroos, had refused to lend him. In 1770, he was sent out as second in Council 
to Madras, and effected such great reforms as to obtain the highest praise of the Directors. When the 
Governor’s post in Calcutta became vacant, they thought they could not give it to a more worthy in- 
dividual than to Mr. Hastings, and at the age of forty he became Governor of Bengal. He took his 
seat as Governor on the 13th of April 1772, and the very first thing to which his attention was direct- 
ed was the revenues of Bengal. The Directors had been thoroughly disgusted with the management oi 
the land revenues by natives. They found their income gradually decreasing ; and they now determi- 
ned, seven years after they had obtained the Dewanny, to “ stand forth as Dewan that is, to take the 
management of the revenues into their own hands, and to make the collections through their European 
servants. This new arrangement was carried into effect by Mr. Hastings, who adopted the most 
excellent measures relative to it ; and he at the same time removed the exchequer from Moorshedabad 
to Calcutta, that it might be under the eye of the Governor. These alterations made it necessary also 
to alter the management of the Civil and Criminal business of the country. Two Courts were esta- 
blished by Mr. Hastings in each district. In the Criminal Court sat the Collector with the Cazee and 
Mooftie ; in the Civil Court sat likewise the Collector, assisted by the Dewan and other officers. 
Two Courts of appeal were at the same time eatablished by him in Calcutta, the Sudder Dewanny, 
for civil, and the Sudder Nizamut Adawlut, for criminal causes. The Chout, or the fourth part of the 
amount of every cause brought into Court, which the Judge had hitherto received, was abolished ; hea- 
vy fines were forbidden ; and the power which a creditor had of confining his debtor at his own will, 
was taken away. All Civil causes under ten Rupees were referred to the head farmer of each Purgun- 
nah. This was the first attempt made by the English in Bengal, to govern it upon their own plan. 

The Directors attributed the loss of their revenues in Bengal to the evil practices -of Mahomed Rheza 
Khan. From the time of his obtaining office, they had regarded him with suspicion. They did not 
forget that, when he held the chu/cla of Dacca under Meer Jaflfer Ali, there was a deficiency of many 
lakhs of Rupees. He was charged by some with having monopolized grain for his own profit, in the great 
famine of 1770, He was suspected not only of having secreted the public revenue, but of having op- 
pressed the people. While he held his post at Moorshedabad, he was the first man in Bengal ; as Naib 
Subadar, he had the entire management of the revenue ; as Naib Nazim, he had the entire charge of 
the police. The Directors knew, that while he enjoyed such power, no one would come forward to 
accuse him. They sent out orders to Mr. Hastings, that he should be put under arrest, and sent down 
with all his family to Calcutta ; and that all his papers should be seized. Mr. Hastings had taken his 
seat in Council only ten days when these orders reached him late at night. The following morning, 
he wrote to Mr. Middleton, the Resident at Moorshedabad, to send Mahomed Rheza Khan to Calcutta. 
He was accordingly brought down to Calcutta to take his trial. The infamous Nundu Komar was set 
up to accuse him ; and as there was no villainy with which he was not familiar, it appeared at first, as 
if the accused would be found guilty ; after an investigation, however, which lasted tw r o years, he was 
declared innocent, but he was not restored to the public service. On his removal from Moorshedabad, 
his office in the Nizamut was divided. The care of the Nabob’s education to Munnee Begum ; the ex- 
penditure of the funds was entrusted by Mr. Hastings to Gooroodas, the son of Nundo Komar. The 
majority of the Council objected not a little to this appointment, saying that Gooroodas was very 
young, and that to appoint him, was to appoint his father, whom the English never could trust ; but 
Mr. Hastings would not yield to their advice, and he subsequently paid dearly for this act of favour to 
the family. 

The affairs of the Company in England had now come to a crisis. Great as the mismanagement had 
been in India during five years, between the departure of Lord Clive in 1767, and the appointment of 
Mr. Hastings in 1772, the conduct of the Directors in England had been still worse. The Company 
was reduced by its own imprudent measures, to all but insolvent. When the wretched state of the 
Company’s affairs was made public, Parliament determined to take them in hand, for hitherto it had 
never looked into Indian matters. A Committee was appointed to examine into the abuses which had 
been committed by the Company’s Government. After their report had been given in, the Ministry 
perceived that nothing but a radical change could save the Company from ruin. They brought for- 
ward several proposals for reform, in Parliament, which the Directors resisted with all their might ; 
but their misconduct had been so plain, and had so disgusted all men, that in spite of all their opposi- 
tion, Parliament supported the plans which the Minister proposed. The whole form of the Govern- 
ment of India, was now changed both at home, and abroad. Some alteration was made in the manner 
of choosing the Directors, by which many evils, which had occurred in England were corrected ; and 
it was ordered, that six Directors should go out of office every year, and six others be chosen in their 
room. It was ordered that the Governor of Bengal should be the Governor General of India, and that the 
other Presidencies should be subject to him in political matters. As there had been frequent disputes 
about power between the Governor and the Members of Council, it was settled, that the Governor 
General should be the sole Governor and Commander of Fort William. The Governor General, the 
Members of Council, and the Judges were forbidden to trade ; and hence his salary was fixed at two 
lakhs and half of rupees a year, and that of the Councillors at eighty thousand. It was also ordained that 


49 


THE RIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. it. S. 

no person in the service of the Company, or of the Crown should receive presents. All the Correspond- 
ence from India, which related to the government of the country, the Directors were ordered to lay 
before the king’s ministers, 

Regarding the administration of justice, it was provided that a Supreme Court should be established 
in Calcutta, to consist of a Chief Justice at 80 thousand Rs., and 3 Puisne Judges at 00,000 Rs. a 
year. The Judges were to be independent of the Company, and to be appointed by the Crown, and 
the Court was to administer British law, to British subjects. It was ordained that this Act, which was 
the first passed by Parliament, relative to Indian affairs, should come into operation on the 1st August 
1774. 

Mr. Hastings had managed the affairs of Bengal, with so m*ch ability, that he was appointed the 
first Governor General. But notwithstanding, his talents and his success, great prejudices existed 
against him in England, and he was considered by those, who knew nothing of the state of affairs, as 
a man of the worst principles. The new Councillors, who were appointed to the Supreme Council, to 
act with him, were Mr. Barwell, of the Civil Service, who was in India ; and Colonel Monson, Sir 
John Clavering, and Mr. Francis, who had never been in this country. These three gentlemen came 
out with their minds, strongly prejudiced against Mr. Hastings, and were disposed to look with an evil 
eye, upon all his measures. As soon as he heard of their arrival at Madras, he wrote to them to be- 
speak their confidence. The Senior Member of Council, was deputed to meet them on their arrival at 
Kedgeree ; and one of the Governor General’s own staff was sent down to welcome them. When they 
landed in Calcutta, they were received with higher honours, than had been paid to Lord Clive, or Mr. 
Vansittart, with a salute of 17 guns ; and all the Members of Council were assembled to receive them ; 
but their vanity was not satisfied. They complained to the Court of Directors, that proper honours 
had not been paid them ; that the troops were not drawn out to receive them ; that a sufficient salute 
had not been fired ; that they were received at Mr. Hasting’s house, and not in the Council Chamber ; 
and, that the new Government, of which they formed a part, had not been proclaimed with sufficient 
pomp. 

When the Council met for business, Mr. Hastings placed before his colleagues, who were cpiite new 
to the affairs of India, a view of the state of the Company’s affairs in every branch of business. But 
in this first meeting, those disputes broke out which distracted the Government of India for nearly 
seven years. Mr. Barwell alone sided with the Governor General ; the other three members invariably 
voted against him upon every question, and as they formed the majority, the Governor General became 
a mere cypher ; all power was in reality transferred into their hands. The measures which they 
adopted were dictated by their dislike of Mr. Hastings, and partook far more of passion than reason. 
Indeed it is a matter of astonishment, that in the six years which elapsed between the operation of this 
new plan of Parliament and 1780, the divided Government of India did not go to pieces altogether. 

The whole object of these councillers was to hold up Hastings to contempt. They would not listen 
to his admonitions or remonstrances, but only to their own passions ; and their conduct throughout 
was marked by much ignorance and littleness of mind. 

The natives were not slow in remarking the disputes in Council, and to see that Mr. Hastings, who 
was lately supreme, had no longer any power. Every man, therefore, who was displeased with any 
decision he had passed, went with his complaint to Mr. Francis and his colleagues, and was heartily 
received. The Ranee of Burdwan, the widow of Tiluk Chaund, came down at this time to Calcutta 
with her son. She was immediately put up to send in a petition, stating that since the Rajah’s death 
she had disbursed nine lakhs of Rupees in bribes among the English, and their servants, and that of 
this sum Mr. Hastings had received 15,000 Rupees. He demanded to see the accounts in Bengalee 
and Persian, but she would produce none. Rewards were now held out to all who would accuse Mr. 
Hastings, and informers were brought from all parts of Bengal. Accusations came in thick and fast. 
One native presented a petition stating that the Fouzdar of Hooghly received a salary of 72,000 Rupees 
a year, of which he paid Mr. Hastings 36,000 Rupees and 4,000 to his dewan. The petitioner offered 
to do the duty for 32,000 Rupees a year. Even this stupid charge, which any man who knew the 
native character could see through, was received. Evidence was taken ; the majority of the Council 
said it was complete ; the Fouzdar was dismissed, and the office, upon the reduced salary, was given, 
not to the informer, but to another. In a month, another charge was brought on, that Munnee 
Begum had not accounted for nine lakhs of Rupees. When pressed she said that a lakh and a half of 
Rupees had been paid as entertainment money to Mr. Hastings when he went up to install her. Mr. 
Hastings said that the sum had been received and expended by him on the public account, and that 
the Company had been saved that amount. He also stated that the Nabob of Bengal always received 
1,000 Rupees a day for his expenses, whenever he visited Calcutta. Mr. Hastings’ explanation was not 
satisfactory, but there is no reason to believe that the money was spent on any other than on a public 
account. 

As it was now seen that any accusation would be received, even the infamous Nundu Koomar 
brought up a complaint against Mr. Hastings. He affirmed that the Governor General had received 
three lakhs and a half of Rupees for the appointment of Munee Begum, and of his own son Gooroodas, 
to the Nabob’s household at Moorshedabad. Mr. Francis and Ills party proposed that Nundu 
Koomar should be brought forward in the Council to give evidence. Mr. Hastings replied, that he 
would not allow this man to come to the Board at which he presided, as Ills accuser. He said he would 
not degrade the office of Governor General in the eyes of all India by such base submission ; but he 
offered at the same time to refer the whole question to the .Supreme Court ; Mr. Hastings then rose 
and quitted the Council, and Mr. Barwell followed him. Mr. Francis and his party, on their departure, 
called in Nundu Koomar, who read a letter, which he said had been written to him by Munnee Begum, 
regarding the bribes she had given. A comparison was made between this letter and one which she 
had written to Government, and which Sir John D’Oyly produced. The seals agreed, but the hand- 
writing was not the same. After Nundu Koomar’s death, the secret of this villainy was revealed. In 

H 


50 TltE RIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. 

his possession were found fae similes of the seals of all the great personages in Bengal. There can be 
little doubt that the letter was a forgery, and that the seal was affixed to it by Nundu Koomar, and not 
by Munnee Begum. The Council, however, voted that Nundu Koomar’s charge was true, and ordeied 
that Mr. Hastings should refund the money, which he of course refused to do. While this aflair was 
pending, Mr. Hastings brought an action for conspiracy against Nundu Koomar in the Supreme Court ; 
and the three members of Council to show their dislike of the Governor General, went in a body to visit 
that native; a step which had never yet been taken in India. It was in this manner that Mr. Francis 
and his party continued for several years to thwart Mr. Hastings and to embarrass the Government oi 
the country. 

A few days after Mr. Hastings’ chfcrge against Nundu Koomar, a native of the name of Komal-ood- 
deen, brought an action against him in the Supreme Court, for having forged his name to a deed, 
Nundu Koomar was found guilty, and hung in the month of July 1775. The natives were thunder- 
struck when they saw one of the greatest men in India, and a Brahman, hung in the city of Calcutta. 
It was the first time in which a native of rank had ever been executed by the English. It is said that 
more than a hundred thousand of his countrymen surrounded the scaffold. To the last they believed 
that there was no intention of putting him to death ; but when they saw him actually executed, they ran 
down with one accord to the river, to wash out the pollution. The death of Nundu Koomar has been 
charged upon Mr. Hastings, because it was believed that he supported the prosecution. But the fact 
is, that it was the act of the Supreme Court, and this was one among the complaints which were made 
against that tribunal some years after. There can be no doubt that Nundu Koomar was one of the 
most infamous characters among the natives. The Governors of Bengal had, one after the other, 
declared him to be unworthy of trust. He had been discoverd in a treasonable correspondence with 
the enemies of the English, and since the battle of Plassey had been constantly intriguing with every 
party ; still he died unjustly. The crime for which he was condemned in the Supreme Court had been 
committed four years before the Court existed, when he could not have been subject to its jurisdiction. 
The crime, moreover, was not capital by the Hindoo law. He was put to death, therefore, contrary 
to reason or equity. But he died enormously rich. In the various posts which he had filled, he had 
amassed a fortune of more than a crore of Rupees. 

In September 1776 Col. Monson died, and as there remained but two members of his party, Mr. 
Hastings regained his power in the Council, because he had the casting vote. 

When in 1772, the business of the country was transferred to European officers, Mr. Hastings 
thought it necessary that they should be made acquainted with the native laws. Under his patronage 
Mr. Halhed prepared, from native works, a code of Hindoo and Mahomedan laws, which was printed 
in 1775. Mr. Halhed was a gentleman of eminent talents ; he had come out in the Civil Service about 
the year 1770, and applied himseif to the study of the native language. He made such progress in 
them as no European had ever made before. He may be regarded as the first Englishman who 
obtained a classical knowledge of this language. This gentleman also published a grammar of it, the 
first which had ever appeared. It was printed at Hoogly with a font of Bengalee types cut and cast, 
by Mr. Charles Wilkins, and the first which had ever been seen. 

The disputes between the Supreme Court and the Government occasioned great misery to the country 
for several years. This Court was established in 1774, and made independant on the Company’s 
Government. The Judges came out with very strong notions of the oppressions to which the people 
were subject, and with the idea that the Supreme Court was the best remedy for those grievances. 
When the Judges landed at Chandpaul Ghaut, and saw the natives with their legs bare, one of them 
said to the other, “ see, brother, the oppressions to which the people have been subject. The Supreme 
Court was not established before it was needed. I hope our Court will not have been six months in 
existence, before these poor wretches will be comfortably provided with shoes and stockings.” The 
Supreme Court was no sooner set up, than it began to enlarge its jurisdiction. It was the fault of 
Parliament that the powers of the Court were not better defined. Parliament had created two indepen- 
dent and rival powers in the country, and they soon came into collision with each other. The Court, 
in a variety of ways, disturbed the peaceful government of the country and was the cause of much con- 
fusion during Mr. Hastings’ administration. On account of the oppression of this Court petitions were 
presented to Parliament by the British inhabitants of Calcutta, and by the Governor General in Council, 
praying for relief. The subject was fully discussed, and a new act was passed which took away that 
jurisdiction over the whole country which the Court had been so anxious to obtain. 

Before this act was passed, Mr. Hastings devised means for quieting the Supreme Court, by putting 
a sop in the mouth of the judges. He made the Chief Justice, Sir Elijah Impey, the Chief Judge of 
the Sudder Dewanny Adawlut, with an additional salary of 5000 Rs. a month, and 600 Rs. for the 
rent of an office ; one of the Puisne Judges was also enriched at the same time by a new office at Chin- 
surah, which owing to a war with the Dutch, had fallen into the hands of the English. About this 
time Mr. Hastings made a great improvement in the country Courts. He erected Civil or Dewanny 
Courts in various Zillahs, to hear Civil suits, and ordered the Provincial Courts to confine themselves 
to revenue affairs. Sir Elijah Impey, also having taken his seat in the Sudder Dewanny Court, drew 
up certain regulations for the guidance of the Civil Courts throughout the country. These were 
afterwards increased to ninety, and became the basis of the Civil Code of Lord Cornwallis. 

During the Government of Mr. Hastings, on the 29th January 1780, the first newspaper ever pub- 
lished in India, made its appearance in Calcutta. 

Towards the close of Mr. Hastings’ administration, he was employed chiefly out of Bengal, in mana- 
ging the affairs of Benares and Oude, in a war with Hyder Ally, the Rajah of Mysore, and in negotia- 
tions all over India. His conduct in the Western Provinces was greatly censured in England, both by 
the Directors and in Parliament. It was even proposed in the House of Commons, that lie should be 
recalled for having acted against the honour and interests of England ; but the vote did not pass, and 
lie remained at his post. After having made another tour to Oiule, at the close of 1784, he returned to 


51 


THE EIGHT HONORABLE WARREN HASTINGS, L. L. D. AND F. R. S. 

Calcutta, early in 1785, made over the keys of the Treasury and of Fort William to his successor, Mr. 
Macpherson, and embarked for England, where he arrived in June. 

During Mr. Hastings’ Government, in 1784, was founded the Asiatic Society of Calcutta, by Sir 
William Jones, one of the Judges of the Supreme Court, and who, as a scholor, had acquired great dis- 
tinction in his native land. The object of this Society was to inquire into the habits, the language, and 
institutions of ancient India. A number of individuals, who were fond of the same pursuits, joined 
him in this undertaking ; and their researches gave the first idea on these subjects to the European 
world. Mr. Hastings gave the Society the warmest encouragement, and became its first President. 

Mr. Hastings had no sooner landed in England, than the Directors, by a public vote, declared their 
approbation of his conduct. He was not without blame, in many of his proceedings in India; but it 
must be confessed, that he acted with the utmost skill and vigour, and that it was he who consolidated 
the empire which Clive had conquered. Much of the censure which was cast on him, was due to the 
misconduct of the natives who were employed by him. Gunga Govind Singh, Canto Baboo, and 
Devy Singh, were the three men who had the largest power, and made the largest fortunes during his 
reign. Of these, Devy Singh was, perhaps, the most unprincipled. As one of the farmers of revenue, 
he acquired a large fortune by oppressing the poor ryots. The unheard of cruelties which this infa- 
mous wretch practised, more especially at Dinagepore, can never be read without a feeling of horror. Of 
all this, Mr. Hastings was obliged to bear the blame in England ; but in India, the natives knew well 
how to distinguish between the orders of the master, and the villainy of the servant. During the first 
six years of his Government, he was thwarted by the Members of Council, who did every thing in 
their power to annoy and insult him. At the same time his authority was nearly subverted by the 
Supreme Court. But he nobly declared, that he would not quit his post, because it was difficult ; 
and he had a spirit and an energy which no troubles could subdue. During the latter part of his Go- 
vernment, he was engaged in a war with Hyder Ali, which eat up the revenues of the country. He 
was too often in great straits for money, and was sometimes obliged to adopt extraordinary means to 
obtain it. But on the whole he was a very great man ; he is held in the highest veneration by the 
natives ; and they teach their children to this day, to pronounce the name of Warren Hastings with 
affection. 

But however, great animosity continued to prevail against Mr. Hastings in England ; and at length, 
on the 13th February, 1788, he was impeached by the House of Commons, at the bar of the House of 
Lords, of high crimes and misdemeanors. The trial was conducted with unusual pomp. The royal 
family, the peers, and the peeresses were present ; and the ablest men in England appeared before this 
august assembly as his accusers. His conduct was sifted, as the conduct of no political character was 
ever sifted before. The trial was spun out by various delays to seven years, and, at length, on the 23rd 
April, 1795 the Lords, with a very few exceptions, acquitted him of all the charges which had been 
brought against him. 

The law expenses during the impeachment bore heavy on Mr. Hastings, and although an idea had 
gone forth of his immense wealth, and his name and that of his wife, were never mentioned without 
being associated with crores of Rupees, necklaces of diamonds, &c. &c., after paying his various debts in 
1786, the sum total of his fortuue amounted to no more than 05,3 13,£\ 13s. 6d. 

On this his friends proposed to reimburse the Governor General, out of the revenues of the Com- 
pany, on account of the legal expenses incurred by him in making his defence ; as the case was found- 
ed on the public acts of his Government in Bengal. An annuity of 5000, £ J . was also voted, and the 
whole proposition was submitted to the Board of Commissioners for the affairs of India, by the Direc- 
tors, for their approval and confirmation, pursuant to the act of Parliament, But some legal difficul- 
ties intervening, the original vote was never completed ; and it was not until March 2d, 1796, that the 
then chairman, Sir Stephen Lushington, informed a General Court, “ that a vote for annuity of 4 ()()()£’. 
per annum, for 28 years and a half, had been passed by the Court of Directors, and confirmed by the 
Board of Control, and that the law expenses should also be cleared, although the precise mode had 
not yet been settled. 

From this moment Mr. Hastings seems to have courted obscurity. His lady, indeed, went to 
Court ; and was received with distinguished respect by Her Majesty, but Mr. Hastings received no 
mark of royal favour until the death of Mr. Burke and Mr. Fox, and most of those who had managed 
the prosecution against him ; it was not until then that the rank and distinction of a privy counsel- 
lor was bestowed on him. 

The remainder of his life was spent at Daylesford, the scene of his boyish days, in adorning his 
grounds, and improving his estate. And he lived here among pleasing thoughts and delightful asso- 
ciations. He lived long enough to behold many of his plans laid for the aggrandizement of British 
India realized, through the agency of others : for the brilliant acquisition of the Marquises of Wellesly 
and Hastings, are to be considered but as the early projects of a man whose gigantic ambition had 
grasped at the subjugation of all Asia. At length, having attained his ^th year, he died August 22nd, 
1818. In private life, Mr. Hastings lias always been represented as amiable, conciliating, and seduc- 
tive. As a public servant he achieved much for the permanent benefit and advantage of his employers : 
and it must be allowed, that he rendered the English name and exploits known to the most distant re- 
gions of India. 

In token ot grateful testimony of the benefits he conferred upon India, his statue is placed at the 
Town Hall, with the following Inscription : — 

lo the Right Honorable Warren Hastings, 

MDCCCXXX. /-? 0 } 


52 SIR EYRE COOTE, K. B.— PRINCE HYDER ALLY. 

SIR EYRE COOTE, K. B., (Lieutenant General in the Army , and Commander -in- Chief of the 

British Forces in India.) 

Sir Eyre Coote embarked last for India, m 1778. Exclusive of the most brilliant actions per- 
formed by him in the year 1700-1, his country naturally resorted to their deplorable, and every thing, 
but finally lost situation, on the coast of Coromandel, in the year 1780, when Sir Eyre Coote pushed 
through the North East Monsoon from Bengal, with only 600 European troops, to the relief of 
Madras, rescuing this desponding, falling, Presidency, and effecting, by his presence and exertions, a 
fortunate change and extrication, from the seemingly impossible difficulties and dangers then surround- 
ing our invaluable Eastern possessions. 

Compare but the adverse circumstances attending the disastrous era of September, 1780, with the 
two ensuing successful campaigns of 1781, and up to September, 1 782, when Sir Eyre Coote was 
necessitated, by a severe fatal indisposition, to quit the Coromandel field ; and the recollection of 
facts alone, which prevailed at the periods alluded to, decide the high obligation Britain is under to him. 

The world in general feel not the real intrinsic worth of illustrious characters, or valuable posses- 
sions, till they are no more, or till we are in danger of losing them. Modern Eastern anecdotes and 
history most pointedly exemplify the truth of this assertion. Now the value of our Eastern possessions 
begin to be, by degrees, partially understood ; it will be remembered by the British empire, that the 
superior abilities, personal successful exertions, zeal of service, established and acknowledged military 
character of the late Sir Eyre Coote, in the hour of peril and extreme danger to the state, checked 
the rapid torrent of invasion, restored firmness, love of enterprise to our army, and uniformly led to 
victory. A very limitted number of infantry alone under his own immediate command, though opposed 
to the most formidable and numerous enemies ever encountered by us in Asia ; and that at the Gene- 
ral’s decease, the British Military character in India, was happily recovered to his country, respected 
and dreaded by their enemies, 

Sir Eyre Coote died at Madras, and his remains were enterred under the Gallery of St. Mary’s 
Church, Fort St. George, with every mark of honor and respect. 

A whole length Portrait of this gallant General, is placed in the hall of the Madras Exchange. 

The monument to the memory of Sir Eyre Coote, erected by the East India Company, in testimony 
of their esteem for the character of this gallant Officer, is placed in Westminster Abbey. 

The work is at once an honour to great military merit, and to the ingenious artist, Banks, whose 
talents have so ably recorded it. 

The monument consists of two figures as large as life; one is a Mahratta or Hindoo captive, 
weeping by the side of a trophy of Persian armour, representing a province subdued ; he is holding an 
inverted cornucopia, the contents of which are falling into the shield of Britannia. 

The other figure is Victory, who, having erected the trophy, is decorating it with the portrait of Sir 
Eyre Coote, which she is hanging on a palm tree that rises behind the armour. 

On the sarcophagus is an elephant, to mark the scene of action. 

The whole is intended to represent a province of the East, preserved to his country by the victories 
of the heroic Coote. It is placed near the entrance of the North door, and is twelve feet wide, and 
twenty-six high. 

On the Sarcophagus is the following Inscription. 

This Monument is erected by 

The East India Company as a Memorial of the Military Talents 
of Lieutenant General Sir Eyre Coote, K. B. 

Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces in India, 
who by the success of his arms in the year 1760 and 1761, 

Expelled the French from the Coast of Coromandel. In 1781 and 1782 
He again took the field in the Carnatic, 

In opposition to the united strength of the French and Hyder Ally ; 

The numerous forces of the latter he defeated in several engagements, 

But Heath interrupted his career of glory, 
on the 12th of February, 1783, in the fifty-eighth year of his age. 

Anecdotes of Sir Eyre Coote. 

It is a fact well known that the Sir Eyre Coote exposed himself too frequently during the wars 
in the Carnatic, both to the fire of the enemy and the heat of the sun. 

The General and his Staff were standing in a group one morning, when Hyder pointed a gun at 
them. The ball struck the ground near Coote; “ you had better move, Sir,” said an officer ; “ you 
are observed.” “ Never mind,” replied the General, “ they could not do that again.” 

Another time one of his aid-de-camps observed that he had endangered his health and the fate of 
the army by exposing himself too much to the sun. “ Tut, tut,” exclaimed the veteran, “ the sun 
has no more effect on me than on a deal board.” “Aye, but Sir,” rejoined the aid-de-camp, “ you 
should recollect that it is not the first old board that the sun has split !” 


PRINCE HYDER ALLY. 

Prince Hyder Ally was the son of a person who served in quality of Killadar or governor of a 
small fortress to one of the kings of Mysore ; also father of the formidable Tippoo Sultan. He is said to 
have acquired the rudiments of war in the French camps ; and, in the year 1753, he distinguished 
himself as their auxiliary, in the plains of Trichinopoly. About ten years after, being then at the head 
of the Mysore Army, he dethroned his sovereign, and governed the kingdom under the title of regent. 
Soon after he extended his dominions on every side, the Carnatic excepted, until at last he was at the 
head of a state, equal in extent to Great Britain, and producing a gross revenue of four millions sterling. 
In 1707, 1708, and 1769, he was engaged in a war with the English. In this war he displayed great 


VIZIER ALLY. 


53 


spirit and ability, for making a sudden irruption in the Carnatic, with an army consisting pi mcipa y 
of cavalry, he came within seven miles of Madras, and dictated a peace to the Government of t iat 
place. But in 1771 Hyder sustained a total defeat from the Marliattah army, within a few miles of 
his capital, into which he escaped with great difficulty, with a small remnant of his army, and 
afterwards defied the attacks of his numerous enemies, who possessed neither the skill nor the ordinary 
requisites fora siege. He waited in patience, till the enemy by desolating the country, were compelled 
to leave it. A few years of peace not only restored matters to their former state, but improved both 
his revenues and arms to a degree beyond probability : and at the same time, the distractions that 
prevailed among the Marhattahs, enabled him to extend his territories at their expense. In 1/80, 
during the late war with France, Hyder Ally made a second irruption into the Carnatic at the head of 
100,000 troops, both horse and foot, the very best of their kind that had ever been disciplined by a 
native of India. His success in cutting to pieces Colonel Baillie’s detachment, and the consequent 
retreat of the Carnatic army, occasioned the British interests in that quarter, to be given up for lost, 
in the opinion of most people in Europe. Happily, however, Mr. Hastings, then Governor General of 
Bengal, and the late Sir Eyre Coote, Commander-in-Ghief of the Forces in India, thought otherwise, 
This excellent officer soon put a stop to the victorious progress of Hyder Ally. With a force scarcely 
exceeding 7000 men, he compelled that indefatigable warrior to raise the siege of several fortresses, 
and on the 1st of July 1781, he gained a complete victory over his vast army, consisting of 150,000 
men. Hyder sustained successively six more defeats. That of the 7th of June 1782, was the last in 
which these two great Commanders were destined to meet each other ; nor was either of them present, 
afterwards, at any action of importance. Each died a natural death, within five months of the other : 
Hyder, toward the end of 1782, and Coote, in February 1783. 


In the Mausoleum of Hyder Ally. 


If Chance or curiosity, be the guide which brought thee hither 
Traveller ; a moment stop — and know, 

Nature within this little space, hath fix’d her throne, 
hath here made the deposit, and sanctified the treasury : 

Here, pensive Contemplation dwells, and awful silence holds the gloomy veil, 

Which shuts out all the tinsel pomp of human grandeur; 
and terminates with its inquietudes, the views of vain ambitious man — for ever ! 

Leave then these melancholy shades, and fly to scenes more vivid — more engaging 
to thee— but, sad remembrance there must yield for all thy trouble, 
****** Or, if thou wilt explore, if tired with the busy whirl of satiating life, 
thou art come to learn an universal lesson, pleased to behold the transitory state of man, 
and draw a just conclusion. Behold this trifling pile, 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Hyder Ally, a Prince, 

whose origin was mean, obscure, almost beyond enquiry, 

But whose splendid and illustrious merit, 

Raised him to the pinnacle of sublunary greatness. 

With a head to plan, and heart to execute the various schemes in which he was engaged, 
He led his troops victorious — over vast countries, and conquered numerous principalities. 

His aspiring soul knew no bounds, and soar’d above the common views of Kings. 

As a politician— he stands unequal’d — as a Legislator, he was perhaps, too rigidly severe ; 
and, as a tyrant— all his actions were strongly mark’d with unrelenting cruelty ! 

But, prejudice and avarice were perhaps the Judges 
who pronounced the sentence : Go — search the annals that record the deeds of Kings, 
and see how few have passed through life, without a blemish. 

If he had vices, death hath cancel’d them— hath dropt the curtain of oblivion. 

He is no more ! No longer terrifies — no longer punishes. 

His power is at an end — so are its consequences. 

If he had virtues, and surely he had some, 

Those, like his-soul — from whence they sprang, alone exist. 

Be it thy care, to mark them in the strongest and most attracting colours ; 

The voice of benevolence prompts thee to the task. While liberality aids the undertaking. 
Holds to thy view, the mirror of charity, and bids thee remember thou art thyself A MAN. 


VIZIER ALLY, EX-NABOB OF OUDE. 

The vicissitudes of fortune were never more strikingly displayed than in the life and adventures 
of this singular man, who spent half his short existence in an iron cage. 

Vizier Ally, born in 1781, was the adopted son of Asuf-ud-Dowlah, late Nabob of Oude. His 
mother was the wife of a Forash (a menial servant of low description, employed in India in keeping 
the metallic furniture of a house clean.) His reputed father, Asuf-ud-Dowlah, was a wealthy and 
eccentric Prince. Having succeeded to the musnud (throne) of Oude, by the assistance of the East 
India Company, he professed great partiality to the English. “ Mild in manners, polite and affable 
in his conduct ; he possessed no great mental powers ; his heart was good, considering his education, 
which instilled the most despotic ideas. He was fond of lavishing his treasures on gardens, palaces, 
horses, elephants, European guns, lustres and mirrors. He expended every year about 200,000/. in 
English manufactures. This Nabob had more than an hundred gardens, 20 palaces, 1200 elephants, 
3000 fine saddle-horses, 1500 double-barrel guns, 1700 superb lustres, 30,000 shades of various forms 
and colours ; several hundred large mirrors, girandoles, and clocks ; some of the latter were very 
curious, richly set with jewels, having figures in continual movement, and playing tunes every hour • 
two of these clocks cost him 30,000/. Without taste or judgment, he was extremely solicitous to 
possess all that was elegant and rare ; he had instruments and machines of every art and science, but 


54 


SIR JOHN SHORE (LORD TEIGNMOUTIL) 

he knew none ; and his museum was so ridiculously disposed, that a wooden cuckoo clock was placed 
close to a superb time-piece which cost the price of a diadem ; while a valuable landscape of Claude 
Lorraine was suspended near a board painted with ducks and drakes. He sometimes gave a dinner to 
ten or twelve persons, sitting at their ease in a carriage drawn by elephants. His haram contained 
above 500 of the greatest beauties of India, immured within high walls, which they were never to leave 
except on their biers, lie had an immense number of domestic servants, and a very large army, 
besides being fully protected from hostile invasion by the Company’s subsidiary forces, for which be 
paid 500,000/. per annum. 11 is jewels amounted to about eight millions sterling. Amidst this 
precious treasure, he might be seen for several hours every day, handling them as a child does his toys.” 

Asuf had no legitimate children, and it was doubted whether he had any natural ones. He was in 
the habit, whenever he saw a pregnant woman, whose appearance struck his fancy, to invite her to the 
palace to lie-in ; and several women of this description were delivered there, and among the number 
was the mother of Vizier Ally. Several children, so delivered, were brought up and educated in the 
palace. 

The sprightliness of Vizier Ally, while yet an infant, so entirely engrossed the affections of the old 
Nabob, that he determined to adopt him. In conformity with this resolution, the youth received an 
education suitable to a Prince who was destined to succeed to the musnud. He is said, however, to 
have developed at this period a propensity to delight in the suffering of the brute creation. The affec- 
tion of the old Nabob towards Ins adopted son still increasing, he lavished upon him every mark of 
regard. 

At the age of thirteen his marriage took place. To give an idea of the splendour which attached to 
his youth, and from which he subsequently fell, it would be only necessary to read the account of his 
nuptials as inserted in Forbes’ Oriental Memoirs.* 

When Vizier Ally was recognized by Asuf as his successor to the throne, great opposition was mani- 
fested by the old Nabob’s family. He was, however, on the death of the latter, upheld by the English 
Government, and placed on the musnud. An adopted child, by the Mahomedan Law, is entitled to all 
the privileges of legitimate birth. 

Vizier Ally, after being elevated to the throne, showed a turbulent, restless, and intriguing temper, 
and broke his faith with the English Government ; the consequence of which was, his being deposed 
from the musnud, and Sadut Ally, the brother of the late Nabob, placed on it; a pension was assigned 
to Vizier Ally of two lacks of Rupees per annum, (about 25,000/.) but it was considered necessary that 
he should reside near the Presidency, that he might be the more under the eye of Government. He 
in consequence proceeded from Lucknow to Benares, where Mr. Cherry, the Company’s Resident, 
had been sent to make arrangements for his proceeding to the Presidency. Shortly after his arrival 
at Benares, Mr. Cherry invited him to breakfast. He came attended by a large armed retinue. It had 
been previously intimated to Mr. Cherry that his appearance was hostile, and that he ought to be on 
his guard ; but he disregarded the caution. Vizier Ally complained much of the Company’s treat- 
ment of him ; and, in fine, at a signal made by him, several of his attendants rushed in and cut Mr. 
Cherry and his assistant, Mr. Graham, to pieces. They then went away with the intention of pro- 
ceeding to the house of Mr. Davis, another European gentleman, holding a high situation under 
Government, with the view of massacreing him also ; but fortunately he received some intimation of 
his danger before they arrived, and got his family to the top of the house, and posted himself at the 
summit of a narrow circular stone staircase. Here the ruffians pursued him, but with a hog-spear he 
defended himself for a considerable length of time, killing several of his assailants, which in a manner, 
blocked up the passage, till at length he was rescued by a party of the Company’s troops stationed at 
Benares, which came to his assistance. The followers of Vizier Ally killed another European private 
gentleman, residing at Benares, exclusive of the two public officers above mentioned. 

Vizier Ally made his escape into the territory of the Rajah of Berar, a powerful and independent 
Chief, who refused to deliver him up unless under a promise of his life being spared. This the English 
Government considered it expedient to accede to ; and he was accordingly given up and brought down 
to Calcutta, and confined in the garrison of Fort William, in a kind of iron cage, where after an impri- 
sonment of seventeen years, three months, and four days, he died in May 1817, at the age of 36, and 
his remains were interred in the Mussulman Burial Ground at Casia Baguan. 


SIR JOHN SHORE,— (LORD TEIGNMOUTII ,) — (late Governor General of India.) 

There are few lives passed in the laborious and honourable duties of the East India Company’s 
service in India more deserving of commemoration than that of Lord Teignmouth. The executive 
administrations of India, amidst the records of the Bengal Government, for a long and eventful series 
of years, have before them ample testimonies of his public services ; the few surviving friends, who 
lived in familiar intercourse with him, will attest his private and social virtues. 

Mr. Shore was of a Derbyshire family originally, but his father resided many years at Melton in 
Suffolk, and died in 1759, ten years before his son obtained his appointment in the Civil Service of 
Bengal. On his arrival at Calcutta in 1769, the young Civilian was stationed at Moorshedabad, as an 
assistant under the Council of Revenue ; and, in 1772, served as an assistant to the Resident of Rajeshaye. 
He devoted himself with considerable assiduity to the Persian language, and obtained, by means of his 
proficiency in it, the office of Persian Translator and Secretary to the Provincial Council of Moorsheda- 
bad. In 1774, he sat as a member of the Calcutta Revenue Board, till its dissolution in 1781, when 
he was appointed second of the General Committee of Revenue. In 1785, he was recommended by 


* Lis not uncommon for a Calcutta Baboo to lavish a lack of Rupees upon the marriage festival of his 
son. It is his ambition to surpass in prodigality both his contemporaries and predecessors. The nuptials of 
Vizier Ally at Lucknow in 1795 cost 25 Lacks of Rupees, or about 300,000£. The funeral of this man cost 
only a few Rupees ! Such are the vicissitudes of human life. 


55 


SIR JOHN SHORE (LORD TEIGNMOUTH.) 

Mr. Hastings, who he accompanied to England, to a seat in the Supreme Council, as a public servant 
of distinguished talents and integrity. 

But the most prominent feature of Mr. Shore’s early life in India, was his participation in the 
financial and judicial reforms of Lord Cornwallis. 

After the long experience the Court of Directors had had of the judgment and integrity of Mr. Shore, 
it is not at all strange that they should have chosen him for the immediate successor of Lord Cornwallis 
as Governor General of India, which he assumed on the 28th October 1793. Economical promises 
were made at home, and who so able to execute them as the man who had wound himself into all the 
intricacies of Indian finance, and whose policy in relation to the native powers was decidedly pacific ? 
Upon this occasion, Mr. Shore was created a baronet of England, with the title of Sir John Shore of 
Heachcote. Four years afterwards he was raised by patent to an Irish Peerage, with the title of 
Baron Teignmouth. 

On the first accession to the chair of Government, Sir John Shore had to steer between no ordinary 
perplexities. The Mahrattas were jealous of the growing power of the English, and thirsted for the 
spoils of the feeble Nizam, who existed only beneath the shade of British protection. Scindia, now at 
the head of the Mahratta councils, looked to the power of Tippoo as the best counterpoise to that of 
the English. If any thing can be fairly objected to the policy of Sir John Shore, it is, that he relied 
on the good faith of the Mahrattas to act according to existing treaties, which it was their interest to 
set at nought, and left his ally, the Nizam, in a state almost unprotected and defenceless. The first 
pretext of Scindia was the demand of the arrears of the Mahratta Chout (tribute) from the pusillanimous 
Nizam. 

About this period Scindia died. His nephew and successor inherited his policy. War between the 
Nizam and the Mahrattas was inevitable. In March 1795, a general action took place. The Nizam 
was cooped up in a secluded fort, and being reduced to famine, was compelled to conclude a peace on 
the most abject terms. Tippoo, in the meanwhile, remained steadfast to bis father’s antipathies to the 
British name ; at the same time, the affairs of the Nabob of Oude, who largely enjoyed the benefits of 
English protection, became so involved as to threaten the whole of that fine province with ruin and 
depopulation. He refused to pay his contingent for the Cavalry supplied him by the British Government, 
To induce the Vizier, to introduce some necessary reforms into his administration, and to obtain security 
for the expenses disbursed in maintaining the power of the Nabob, the Governor-General undertook a 
journey to Lucknow. The result of the mission was, the acquiescence of the Vizier in the additional 
subsidy of two regiments of Cavalry, British and native. Upon the dimise of the Nabob, shortly after, 
a question arose as to the legitimacy of Asoph ul Dowlah, his son. The question of a kingdom was 
decided against him by the British Government, upon evidence, observes Mr. Mill, on which a Court 
of law in England should not have decided a question of a few pounds. By this decision, Asoph ul 
Dowlah was deposed, and Saadut Ali raised to the musnud, as the eldest surviving son of Sujah ul 
Dowlah. It is an intricate question of law and of policy, and the limits of this article preclude us from 
entering into it. But even Mr. Mill acknowledges that it is impossible to read the Governor General’s 
Minute, recording the transaction, and not to be impressed with a conviction of his sincerity. And the 
Court of Directors, in their letter of the 5th of May 1799, after a long commentary, observe : “ Having 
taken this general view, with a minute attention to the papers and proceedings before us, we are 
decidedly of opinion that the late Governor General, Lord Teignmouth, in a most arduous situation, 
and under circumstances of embarrassment and difficulty, conducted himself with great temper, impar- 
tiality, ability, and firmness ; and that he finished a long career of faithful services, by planning and 
carrying into effect an arrangement, which not only redounds highly to his own honour, but which will 
also operate to the reciprocal advantage of the Company and the Nabob.” 

In January 1798, Sir John Shore, who a few months before his retirement, was raised, as we have 
seen, to the Peerage, returned to England, having been succeeded by Lord Mornington. 

Lord Teignmouth lived in habits of familiar intercourse with Sir William Jones at Calcutta, and 
succeeded him as President of the Asiatic Society. In that Capacity, he delivered, on the 22d May 1791, 
a warm and elegant eulogy of his predecessor, and in 1804 published memoirs of his life, writings and 
correspondence. 

On the 4th April 1807, Lord Teignmouth was appointed a Commissioner for the affairs of India, and 
was sworn one of the Privy Council a few days afterwards. His activity and zeal in the formation of the 
Bible Society, in 1804, are prominent features of his life, and strong indications of his sincere convictions 
and warmth of piety as a Christian believer. He had the honour of being fixed upon as the fittest 
person to preside over that Institution, and of which he was the President for 30 years. Up to the 
latest moments of life his heart beat high with philanthropic feeling. His oriental acquirements were 
consecrated to the service of the Bible Society. 

Lord Teignmouth presided over the Society in a catholic and amiable spirit of good will and 
benevolence towards all sects and communities of Christians. He conducted it through many difficul- 
ties and controversies, some of which were unusually stormy and contentious. 

We must not forget to observe, that Lord Teignmouth was earnestly bent on converting the natives 
of India to Christianity, and in 1811, he published a tract on that subject, entitled, “ Considerations on 
communicating to the inhabitants of India the knowledge of Christianity.” 

Lord Teignmouth died at the advanced age of eighty-two, 14th February 1834. His widow did not 
long survive him. He lived surrounded by every thing that ministers comfort to life ; the attachment 
of a large circle of friends, and the affections of an amiable family ; and his death was rendered cheerful 
and easy by the consolations of religion. Few men have been more eminently useful in their destined 
spheres of action ; few have more amply merited the honours bestowed on them, or better vindicated 
their rightful claim to elevated rank by their talent and integrity, than Lord Teignmouth. We mi<dit 
enlarge upon his personal and private virtues, but we restrain ourselves, in the language of Tacitus • 

“ Abstinentiam el inteyritalem hujusce viri referre, injuria fuerit virtulwn.” 


50 


ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL. 


SIR W. H. MACNAG1ITEN, RARONET. 

William Hay Macnaghten, the second son of Sir Francis Macnaghten, for many years one of the 
Judges of the Supreme Court in Calcutta, was born in the month ot August 1793. He came to India 
at the age of sixteen, in September 1809, as a Cavalry Cadet on the Madras Establishment. Shortly after 
liis arrival, he was appointed to do duty with the Body Guard ot the Governor of Madras, m whose 
family be continued to reside for some months. From the earliest period of his Indian career, his mmd 
was eagerly bent on the pursuit of oriental literature, and he devoted the leisure of his easy appointment 
to the study of Hindostanee and Persian. In May 1811, he obtained the prize ot 500 pagodas, which 
was held out to the junior officers of the army as an encouragement to the study of Hindostanee. 
There was no reward appointed at that time for the successful study of Persian ; but with the view of 
establishing his qualifications for employment in the Political department, to which his aspirations were 
directed, he passed a satisfactory examination in that language. Soon after, he was appointed to a 
Cornetcy in the 4th Cavalry, then stationed at Hydrabad ; he remained with this corps for neaily a yeai, 
during which time he was invited to join the Resident, Mr. Henry Russell, in his visits to the Nizam 
and his Ministers ; and thus obtained an early opportunity of becoming acquainted with the policy and 
feelings of Native Courts. Being desirous of acquiring some knowledge of mathematics, he was 
permitted to join the Institution founded by Lord William Bentinck, for imparting instruction in that 
department of science, and made considerable progress in it. Six months after he had entered on this 
study, he proceeded on survey duty, and returned to Madras on its completion, and continued his 
studies in the Institution for six months longer. During this period, Government offered a prize of 
500 pagodas for eminent proficiency in Persian, and he passed a second examination in it, and secured 
the reward. About the middle of 1813, he joined the escort of the Honourable Mr. Cole, the Resident 
of Mysore. He had already made some progress in a knowledge of the Tamul and Teloogoo languages, 
and he now embraced the opportunity of his residence in Mysore to add to them an acquaintance with 
the Canaries and Mahratta tongues. Shortly after his arrival at the Residency, he was employed by 
Mr. Cole in the capacity of a Political assistant, though not formally recognized as such by Govern- 
ment ; but he was now to quit the Madras Presidency, and enter upon another sphere of employment. 

About the middle of 1814, he received an appointment to the Bengal Civil Service. He arrived in Cal- 
cutta with the most flattering testimonials from the Governor of Madras and from Mr. Cole. The Chief 
secretary at that Presidency was instructed to “ notify the appointment to the Governor of Bengal, and 
at the same time to enclose the honourable testimonies of the proficiency of Air. Macnaghten in the 
Hindostanee and Persian languages, and also to forward letters of a similar tendency from the Resident 
at Alysore, under whom Mr. Macnaghten had been employed.” Mr. Cole’s letter, coming as it did 
from one who was so well qualified to judge of merit, and who had enjoyed the best opportunities of 
estimating Air. Alacnaghten’s attainments, must have been peculiarly gratifying to him. 

He arrived in Calcutta in October 1814, and entered upon the study of Oriental literature with a 
degree of ardour, which has seldom, if ever been surpassed. It is scarcely necessary to say that with 
the knowledge he brought with him, and his habits of intense application, he soon became one of the 
most distinguished students in the College of Fort William. It would be tedious to detail the various 
public encomiums which Air. Alacnagliten received for the successful study of the Oriental languages ; 
and it may be sufficient to observe that he received at different times, six degrees of honour, and ten 
medals of merit, in addition to rewards and prices of books for his proficiency. At the sixteenth 
anniversary of the College, Lord Hastings, in noticing Mr. Macnaghten’s exertions, stated, that “ there 
was not a language taught in the College in which he had not earned the highest distinctions which the 
Government or the College could bestow.” 

On quitting the College in May 1816, he was placed as an assistant to the Register in the Sudder 
Dewanny Adawlut, the highest Court of Appeal in the Presidency ; an appointment eminently calculated 
to improve and mature his knowledge of the languages and laws of the country. In November 1818, 
he was deputed to officiate as Joint-Magistrate of Alalda, and continued there a twelvemonth. In 
February, 1820, he was appointed to act in the higher capacity of Judge and Magistrate of Shahabad, 
and during the two years of his incumbency, afforded the greatest satisfaction, both to the inhabitants 
and his superiors, as the following testimonial will show. “ The reported excellent state of Shahabad 
is consistent with what his Lordship in Council always anticipated from the services of Air Macnaghten, 
and has afforded Government much satisfaction.” 

Iti January, 1822, he returned to Calcutta as Deputy Register of the Sudder Court, and in the 
course of the year, requested that a Committee might be appointed to examine him in Hindoo and 
Mahomedan Law. The Reports of its Members, Captain Lockett and Mr. Lumsden, in the latter, 
and Dr. Carey, Dr. H. H. Wilson, and Captain Price, in the former, speak in the warmest terms of 
the extraordinary proficiency he had evinced during a very searching examination. We need not load 
this article with a transcript of these testimonials ; it will be sufficient to quote the flattering mention 
made of Air. Alacnaghten by the Marquess of Hastings, in the last address which that statesman 
delivered at the College of Fort William : “ For these distinctions a successful candidate has recently 
presented himself and enrolled a name already honourably familiar in the Annals, and associated with the 
best eras and efforts of the Institution. Air. William Alacnaghten has shown in his bright example, and 
even amidst the engrossing duties of public station, that industry can command the leisure, and genius 
confer the power, to explore the highest regions of Oriental literature and to unravel the intricacies of 
Oriental law. The Committee of examination appointed to report on that gentleman’s proficiency in 
the study of the Mahomedan and Hindoo law, have expressed a very high opinion of his attainments, 
and have pronounced him eminently qualified to consult, in the original, any work on the subject. It 
is true, indeed, that his labours have been prosecuted beyond the walls of this Institution ; but within 
them was the foundation laid on which Mr. Alacnaghten has reared so noble a superstructure.” Within 
a fortnight after this commendation, on the 5th of September, 1822, lie was gazetted as Register of the 


57 


SIR W. H. MACNAGHTEN, BARONET. 

Sudder Dewanny, within six years after lie had quitted the College. This important appointment he 
continued to hold for eight years and a half. The same extraordinary diligence which had raised him 
to public distinction, was now exhibited in discharging the duties of the office with which he was 
rewarded. In addition to the daily labours of the Court, he was enabled to carry through the Press, 
three vols. of the reports of decided cases, and those which had been allowed to run into arrears, he was 
enabled to bring up almost to the date of publication. Of the cases published, more than two-thirds 
were reported by himself. They arc remarkable for their fulness and accuracy, and are considered a 
standard 'authority on all legal questions to which they refer. They enjoy the same reputation in our 
local Courts, which the most esteemed and authentic reports do in the Courts at home. While occupy- 
ing this station, he employed his knovvldge of Sanskrit and Arabic for the benefit of the public, and 
compiled two works, the one “ Considerations on Hindoo law,” the other on Mahomedan law — which 
has proved eminently useful in abridging and guiding the labours of the Judges. These monuments ot 
his erudition and industry will long continue to render his memory grateful to all who are employed 
at the bar, or on the bench in this country. 

At the close of 1830, Lord William Bentinck determined to make a tour through the upper and western 
provinces for the facility of examining many questions of great interest and importance relative to the 
revenue, the police, and the judicial systems, and more particularly to expedite the survey and settle- 
ment of the North-west provinces. He was anxious to take the Council and the Secretariat with him, 
with the view of establishing a Government on the spot, and discussing and deciding the important 
questions which pressed on the attention of the public authorities. But it was discovered that the letter 
as well as the spirit of the law, was opposed to such a proceeding, and that the powers of the Governor 
General in Council, could only be exercised in Calcutta. The new charter which was soon afterwards 
passed, provided for such a contingency, and enabled the Governor General to proceed on deputation 
to any part of the Presidency with the full powers of the Council board, except in matters of legisation. 
Lord William Bentinck was constrained, therefore, to proceed on his tour without any other assist- 
ance than that of an intelligent Secretary ; and it reflects no small credit on Mr. Macnaghten that he 
should have been selected by so excellent a judge of character for his confidential adviser, in the circle 
of difficult and important duties on which he was about to enter. Mr. Macnaghten’s political career, 
through which he reached the highest distinction open to the ambition of the Civil Service in about 
eleven years, may be said to have commenced in January 1831. He accompanied the Governor Gene- 
ral in his progress through the provinces, and assisted at the investigations and deliberations which then 
took place. He afterwards went with his Lordsliip, as the official Secretary, to the meeting with 
Runjeet Singh at Roopur, where he obtained his first insight into the mysteries of Lahore policy. This 
training in the school of one of the greatest statesmen ever employed in the Indian administration, was 
eminently beneficial to Mr. Macnaghten in his subsequent career, and it placed him at once in the 
foremost rank of political functionaries. On the return of Lord William Bentinck to the Presidency 
at the beginning of 1833, Mr. Macnaghten was entrusted with the Secret and Political Departments, and 
continued to occupy this post in the Secretariat, both of the Government of India and of Bengal, for 
more than four years. 

Lord Auckland succeeded to the Government of India in March 1836, and in October 1837, pro- 
ceeded on a tour to the N. W. Provinces. He resolved to take with him the individual in whom his 
predecessor had reposed confidence on a similar occasion ; and it would have been difficult to point out 
any individual, with the exception of Mr. Prinsep, better qualified, from his knowledge of the internal 
machinery of the Government, and its political relations with subordinate or independent states, to give 
his Lordship sound and salutary advice. 

In October 1837, he left Calcutta, which he was never destined to revisit, but in which he was to 
find a melancholy but honourable grave. He proceeded to Simla in the suite of the Governor General. 
In the following year, Lord Auckland deemed it necessary to despatch the expedition across the Indus, 
to avert the dangers which appeared to menace the empire from the machinations of Russia, and the 
hostile movements of Persia ; and he entrusted the political management of it to Mr. Macnaghten, in 
the Capacity of Envoy and Minister to His Majesty Shah Soojah. It was in connection with this enter- 
prize which opened with the most brilliant success, but was subsequently marked by the most signal 
disasters, that he has obtained so conspicuous a place in the history of India, and it is upon his con- 
duct, in this difficult and responsible post, that his character as a public man hinges. In this personal 
memoir, we do not profess to enter upon the broad and much debated ground of the political expedi- 
ency or justice of the expedition, which involves so great a variety of considerations. Our object is 
Unfitted to the individual conduct of the Envoy in this new and untrodden path, during the last three 
years of his life. 

The measure which appeared to the public authorities the most advisable for carrying their plan into 
effect, was the establishment of a Government in Afghanistan bound to us by the ties of gratitude and 
a common interest, by the substitution of Shah Soojah on the throne of Cabool in the room of Dost 
Mahomed. There were abundant proofs before our Government of the tyranny of Dost Mahomed ; 
and it was asserted by officers who professed to know the country, and the assertion was supported by 
invitations to return from every chief of note — that the legitimate monarch would be received with open 
arms by the Afghans. He had on one occasion attempted the recovery of his paternal throne without 
our aid ; he had been joined by many chiefs of note, and was within a tittle of success. It was felt that 
Aft’ghanistan, in his hands, would cease to be the theatre of intrigues against our power. 

When the expedition had been determined on, Mr. Macnaghten was deputed to Lahore to conclude 
the tripartite treaty between Runjeet Sing, Shah Soojah, and the British Government. This was the 
first negociation in which he had been employed, and tbe skill with which it was managed, earned for 
him the warm commendation of the Governor General. On his return arrangements were made for 
the assemblage of an Army, intended to raise the siege of Herat and to accompany Shah Soojah to 
Cabool. Mr. Macnaghten was selected as Minister at the Court of the Shah to represent our interests 


58 


SIR W. H. MACNAGHTEN, BARONET. 


and to watch over the progress of events in Central Asia. No man appeared fitter for this duty than 
Mr. Macnaghten ; he was intimately acquainted witli the native languages, and with the habits and feel- 
ings, and policy of the natives. He was an officer of large experience in public aii'airs, and of sound 
judgment. He was accordingly gazetted Envoy and Minister on the 1st October, and accompanied 
Lord Auckland to the great gathering of the troops at Ferozepore. While the army was encamped there, 
it was announced that the Persians had raised the siege of Herat, and retired, which event rendered it 
advisable to reduce the army by one-half, which set out on its long and dreary march through untrodden 
deserts and mountain defiles to seat the Shah on the throne of his ancestors, and Mr. Macnaghten 
accompanied him as envoy and minister. A more difficult and delicate office than that to which Mr. 
Macnaghten was now appointed has seldom been confided to a subordinate functionary in the east. 
He was the chief political Agent in an expedition sent on an hazardous errand, through unknown 
regions, where the military or political experience acquired in India could be of little avail. He was 
to accompany a prince, whom our presence was likely to render unpopular, through a country of the 
most impracticable character, which had been the grave of many previous expeditions, to seat him on 
the throne of his ancestors. He was in a difficult position as to the people of the country, and in a 
still more difficult position as to the Military authorities with whom he was associated. The diplo- 
matic arrangements were placed in one hand, and the military direction of affairs in another. In these 
circumstances it was scarcely possible that the two classes of offices should not come into collision, 
on the numerous occasions in which either negotiations were to regulate Military movements, or those 
movements to assist negotiations. It required no small tact and temper to prevent the interruption of 
the object of the expedition by misunderstandings. The army reached Candahar on the 25th of April, 
but nothing particular worthy of such a notice occurs for some time after this in the career of the Envoy. 
The Military memoirs of the war have told how Ghuzni was taken, how the Dost fled, the subsequent 
surrender of his family, and how the Shah was installed in the Bala Hissar, and how a considerable 
portion of the army was then sent back to India. We are anxious to touch chiefly upon those events 
which served to exhibit the character of the Envoy. At the beginning of 1840, he was honored with 
the most substantial token of the approbation with which his conduct in Afghanistan was viewed, 
by being raised to the dignity of a Baronet. 

On the 3d of November Dost Mahomed suddenly presented himself, and on ascertaining that the 
Envoy was before him, dismounted and claimed his protection. The effect of this sudden apparition 
on the mind of the Envoy may be more easily conceived than described. All idea of retribution or 
revenge vanished from the mind of the Envoy as he took the Dost’s arm and walked up to his house ; 
the Dost, on entering, delivered up his sword, with the remark that he had now no further use for it. 
The conduct of Sir W. H. Macnaghten to the Dost was marked by the kindest sympathy and attention. 
The surrender of the Dost gave Sir W. FI. Macnaghten some respite, and he was enabled to turn his 
attention to the reform of the internal management. 

In September 1840, Sir W. H. Macnaghten had been nominated provisional member of the Council 
of India, and in September 1841, he received farther token of the approbation with which his conduct 
had been viewed in the highest quarters at home, by his appointment to the office of Governor of 
Bombay. He had thus attained the highest honours within the reach of any Civil or Military Servant 
on the Indian Establishment. If he had ambition for high place, it was amply satisfied. He now pre- 
pared to quit Affghanistan, and had fixed the early part of November for the period of Iris departure, 
but, alas ! how vain are human expectations. Thirty-two days after this burst of exultation, he 
became the first victim of an emute which ended in severing our connection with Affghanistan. And 
the very week in which Sir William Macnaghten was making preparations for his departure, he was 
arrested by an insurrection which terminated in his own assassination and the destruction of the entire 
army. In a conference with Akhbar Khan, the son of the Dost, the Envoy was shot dead with the 
pistols which he had a day or two before received as a present from him. 

Thus perished by the hand of an assassin at the age of forty-eight, one of the most distinguished 
servants of the Indian Government, just as he had raised himself by his own merits to the highest 
honours of the administration. 

It was no little relief to the feelings of Sir William Macnaghten’s relatives and friends, that his 
remains were not abandoned in the country in which he had been so treacherously massacred. They 
were rescued from the pit to which the barbarous Affghans had consigned them, by the affectionate 
solicitude of his widow, and brought down to the Presidency, and were accompanied to their final 
resting place by the whole body of the community, and interred amidst the sympathies of the metro- 
polis. A Monument is erected over his grave in the new English Burial Ground in Circular Road. 
The Inscription will be found inserted under the proper head. The following lines are copied from a 
Tablet erected in St. Paul’s Cathedral to his memory : — 

To the Memory of Sir William Hay Macnaghten, Baronet, of the Bengal Civil Service. 

His mind liberally endued by nature and enriched by education and research, 
was quickened into action by high and general impulses, 
alike conducive to good and great results and to honourable distinction. 

Thus, that character became developed, whose excellence acknowledged 
without dissent, was regarded without envy, from the modesty which embellished it. 

Entrusted during a long course of arduous service with confidential authority, 

He advanced the reputation he had early established ; 

Until, whilst Envoy at the Court of Cabul, Honoured by his Sovereign ; 

And on the eve of assuming the Government of Bombay, 

His bright career of earthly usefulness was arrested ; revolt had burst forth upon the land, 
and on the 23rd day of December 1841, in the summer of his manhood, 
and his fortunes, in the forty-eighth year of his age, he fell by the hand of an assassin. 

His public acts will be found recorded in the annals of his country. 

This memorial is the last tribute permitted to private friendship. 


59 


THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY. 


The following Tablet is now in course of erection in St. Paul's Cathedral, by the Compilers : 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Louis Bruce, 

Captain ‘William Burvill Holmes, 

Lieutenant Charles Browne Tulloch, 

of the 12th Regiment, N. I. 

Who died from wounds received in action at Ferozeshuhur, 
on the 21st of December 1845. 

This Tablet is erected by their Brother Officers. 


THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY, K. P. K. G. D. C. L., &c. 

(. Late Governor General of British India.) 

This distinguished individual was one of the galaxy of great men by whom the reign of George III. 
was illustrated and adorned. England was called upon to confront perils, both political and social, 
such as she never before encountered, and by which the whole framework of her policy seemed about to 
be disorganised. And not the least among the remarkable men who were raised up to be her stay and 
her protection against the revolutionary madness which was desolating the rest of Europe, was Richard 
Colley Wellesley, whose abilities will bear a comparison with those of the most gifted and brilliant of 
his contemporaries, and whose services were only second to those of his illustrious brother, his eleve in 
the field of fame, and whose renown is identified with the brightest page of his country’s military glory. 

He was born on the 20th June 1760, his biographer is uncertain whether at Dangan Castle, the seat 
of the family, in the county of Meath, or at their town residence, in Grafton Street, Dublin. His 
father, the Earl of Mornington, was remarkable for his musical abilities, and his kindly and benevolent 
nature first it was that led to the establishment of a loan fund, upon the principle of the Monte Piete 
Institution, by which, while distress was relieved, industry was encouraged, and habits of thrift and 
economy promoted which, in many instances, raised the borrowers from distress and want to opulence 
and prosperity. Lord Mornington died on the 22d of May 1781, and his eldest son, the subject of 
our present memoir, wanted just one month of his majority when he succeeded to the family estate and 
title. He at once placed himself in loco parentis to his younger brothers and sisters, voluntarily made 
himself responsible for his father’s numerous pecuniary obligations, and showed his good sense as well 
as his filial affection by placing the estates under the management of his mother, by whose vigorous 
understanding he knew well they would be better administered than they could be by one whose cares 
must thenceforth be chiefly devoted to public objects. 

Let us now look at him during the most brilliant portion of his career, in his Indian administration. 
On the 4th of October 1797, he was appointed Governor General of India, having been raised to the 
dignity of a Peer of Great Britain, by the title of Baron Wellesley. He had acquired, while a member 
of the Board of Control, a considerable knowledge of the details of Indian government, and had, more- 
over, an opportunity of receiving information and instruction from the Marquis of Cornwallis, with 
whom he was upon intimate terms ; which must have been of great service in imparting to him a living 
knowledge of the various parties and interests with which it concerned him so much to be well acquainted. 
Upon his arrival at the Cape of Cood Hope it was his good fortune to meet with Lord Macartney, 
Colonel Hobart, and General Baird ; all of them long residents in India, and having filled stations of 
trust and importance, which stamped a peculiar value upon their communications. From them he learned 
the perilous state of our Eastern possessions, from a French influence which was at that time making 
itself felt ; and he was thus early warned of the necessity of those precautionary measures, by the wise 
and vigorous adoption of which our Indian interests were placed out of danger. 

The arrival of a ship from Calcutta, with despatches for the Secret Committee of the Board of 
Control, was another of the lucky incidents of which the Governor General availed himself. He did 
not for a moment hesitate to assume the responsibility of breaking the seal, and possessing himself of 
their contents, upon the ground that he regarded it as “ an indispensable part of his duty to obtain as 
speedily as possible the most authentic account of events, so deeply affecting the interests committed 
to his charge, and of which any false impression might render him less equal to the execution of his 
public trust.” His brother, Colonel Arthur Wellesley, a name since so renowned, had been at that 
time, a year and three months serving with his regiment in India ; and we may be well assured that 
his observations, both of men and things, were not the least interesting or the least valuable portion of 
the mass of information with which the new representative of the British Government entered upon his 
important duties. He was thus enabled to write a despatch to Lord Melville, before he touched the 
soil of India, conveying as full and as masterly an account of the perilous condition of British interests 
in India, as if he had been a resident for many years ; and to form plans of its future Government, by 
which the evils he had so much reason to apprehend, and which would otherwise in all likelihood, have 
wrested from us our Indian possessions, were effectually prevented. 

On the 8th of June, just twenty-two days after he had arrived at Fort William, his attention was 
arrested by an article of intelligence in a Calcutta newspaper, purporting to be a copy of a proclamation, 
in the French language, published by the Governor of the Isle of France ; and announcing that two 
ambassadors had arrived from Tippoo Sultaun, with letters addressed to the authorities of the Island, 
as well as despatches to be forwarded to the French Directory ; the object of which was, the formation 
of an alliance, offensive and defensive, with France, for the purpose of expelling the English from 
India. General Harris was at that time commander of the forces, and acting Governor in the Presidency 
of Madras, and to him Lord Wellesley immediately communicated this proclamation, with a view to 
such precautionary measures as the threatened exigency might seem to require. There are those by 
whom he lias been censured for having taken so strong a step, upon grounds apparently so very slight. 
But he knew the man with whom he had to deal, and even if no such proclamation appeared^ he felt 


00 THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY. 

the necessity of being on his guard against him. Tippoo has been rightly described as the royal tiger 
of Mysore; and the stealth, as well as the savage energy of that formidable beast of prey, found their 
counterparts in his character and his policy, which were as wily and crouching as they were ferocious. 
He could creep until he came within a spring of his victim, and the first notice of his approach would 
be tbe bound by which his enemy would be secured and all further struggle with him rendered hope- 
less. Was Lord Wellesley to wait until such an enemy had matured his plans, and, by means of 
French auxiliaries and French intrigue, gone far to accomplish his objects? — No. Wisdom required 
that there should be promptitude and vigour in the movement by which this formidable danger was to 
be arrested; and while Lord Wellesley resolved that nothing on his part should be left undone by 
which the British interest in India might be protected from attack, he took good care that his mea- 
sures should be so reasonable, that no just offence could be taken at them, if fortunately, his apprehen- 
sions should be proved to have been groundless. “ You will,” he writes to General Harris, “ there- 
fore, turn your attention to the means of collecting a force, if necessity should unfortunately require 
it ; but it is not my desire that you should proceed to take any public steps towards the assembling the 
army, before you receive some further intimation from me.” 

He did not hesitate a single moment after the authenticity of the French proclamation had been 
fully established, to acquaint Lord Harris with his final determination, which was, to call upon the 
allies without delay, and to assemble the army upon the coast with all possible expedition. 

‘‘You will receive,” he writes, “ my public instructions in the course of a few days. Until you 
have received them, it will not be proper to take any public steps for the assembling of the army ; but 
whatever can be done without a disclosure of the ultimate object, I authorize you to do immediately, in- 
tending to apprise you by this letter that it is my positive resolution to assemble the army upon the 
coast. I wish to receive from you, by express, a statement of the force which you can put in motion 
immediately, and within what time you can make any large additions to it.” 

Lord Wellesley, although fully prepared for war, was by no means desirous of pushing matters to 
extremities, as long as any hope remained that security might be obtained by amicable negotiation. He 
accordingly continued to press upon the Sultaun the expediency of such measures as their common 
interests required, and as were indispensable, if friendly relations were to be observed ; and received 
from him the most glowing assurances of undiminished respect and regard, even up to the very mo- 
ment when the campaign was commenced, which he confidently believed must end in our destruction. 

When all was ready for action, Tippoo announced to Lord Wellesley that he was going upon “ a 
hunting expedition.” He did not, however, thus elude the vigilance of his eagle-eyed observer. The 
necessary orders had already been given for the march of our troops into the territory of Mysore ; and 
it soon became manifest to all men, that, bad there been less of foresight or of vigour in anticipating 
and providing against hostile designs, there would have been, humanely speaking, but little chance of 
contending successfully against such an enemy. His first movements are thus described : — 

“ Having succeeded in raising an expectation, that it was his intention to move in the direction of 
Mangalore, he secretly left his camp on the 28th of February, at the head of twelve thousand men, 
and rapidly marching across the country, passed the frontier, and quitting his own territories, sudden- 
ly fell upon the Bombay army, under General Stuart, the total strength of which was 6,420. It is 
important to remark, as a commentary upon all Tippoo’s pacific professions, that he began this move- 
ment five days before General Harris entered Mysore, and that he was engaged in an attempt to cut to 
pieces by surprise the British force at Seedapore, in the dominions of one of the allies of Great Britain, 
at the very moment that at the opposite side of the kingdom, General Harris was entering Mysore. 
Tippoo succeeded in throwing a body of his troops between the detachments of Generals Stuart and 
Hartley, and for a time, threatened the annihilation of the British force. Eventually, however, Tippoo 
was repulsed at all points ; and without awaiting to strike a second blow, hurried back to Seringapa- 
tam. In this affair, the British lost 43 men : Tippoo’s loss was, doubtless, considerable. 

“ Tippoo now concentrated his whole force against the army of Madras, under General Harris, and 
endeavoured to make an impression upon it, before a junction was formed between the forces of Generals 
Harris and Stuart. Tippoo Sultaun in person led on a furious onset on the British lines at Mallavelly, 
remarkable as the place where the illustrious hero of a hundred fights, then Colonel Wellesley, fought 
his first battle in India. A formidable body of Mysore horse bore down upon Colonel Wellesley’s 
division, consisting of the 33rd regiment and the Nizam’s forces. The 33rd were ordered to reserve 
their fire till the enemy were within pistol shot ; they then poured in a dreadful fire, and, quickening 
step, attacked Tippoo’s troops with the bayonet, General Floyd’s dragoons, from the centre, charged at 
this crisis and a total route of the Mysoreans took place. They fled, having suffered a loss of two 
thousand, who fell in the field or in flight. 

On the 7th of April, 1799, General Harris sat down before Seringapatam, and it was not until then 
that Tippoo bethought himself of endeavouring to avert the threatened calamity by negociation. It is 
amusing to read the lamb-like letters in which the baffled tiger now expresses his surprise that his 
capital should thus be assailed ! He cannot at all understand it ! His firm adherence to treaties is con- 
fidently asserted ; and he wonders how he could ever be regarded by the British as anything but their 
most steadfast friend ! But the die was cast. It was too late now to counterfeit or expostulate ; and 
the only terms which were offered to his acceptance by the British General were such as, if accepted, 
must have from henceforth deprived him of all agressive power; and his spirit was not yet sufficiently 
subdued to endure what he regarded as the extreme of humiliation. 

The siege accordingly was carried on with vigour. On the 30th of April, 1799, the breaching battery 
opened against the walls, on the 2d of May a magazine blew up, spreading death and consternation 
amongst the inhabitants ; and on the 3d a breach was formed, which was deemed practicable, and 
preparations were made for the assault on the following day. To General Baird this important duty 
was entrusted, and it could not have been placed in better hands. The intrepid advance of the storming 
party is thus described : — • 


THE MOST NOBLE RICHARD, MARQUIS OF WELLESLEY. 


Cl 


“ Before daybreak on the morning of the 4 th of May — a day memorable in the history of India the 
storming party, consisting of 2,500 Europeans, and 1,800 sepoys, were in the trenches. The General 
hade some of his old comrades of the 71st, who had on a former occasion been oppressed by Tippoo, 
to remember that they had now an opportunity of ‘ paying oft' old scores.’ At one o’clock the signal was 
given : Baird stepped out of the trenches, and, drawing his sword, exclaimed, ‘ now, my brave fellows, 
follow me, and prove yourselves British soldiers !’ It is scarcely possible adequately to conceive the 
anxious suspense with which the progress of the intrepid and devoted band, as they dashed forward 
upon the ‘ forlorn hope,’ was viewed from the lines. 

Baird was rapidly followed by his mem, as he crossed the rocky bed of the river Cavery, which it 
was necessary to pass before the foot of the breach could be gained. The General is in the breach ! 
the assaulting column presses forward in close array, volumes of tire and smoke envelope the assailants ; 
the hurrahs of the British are heard amid the thunders of the artillery — they rush forward undaunted 
by the deadly storm ; a chosen band of Tippoo’s guards make a sally on the flank of the assailants ; the 
Mysoreans are repulsed with fearful slaughter, and the next moment the English colours wave from the 
walls ! These were the events of less than ten minutes. General Baird, and Colonels Sherbrooke and 
Dunlop, swept the ramparts to the right and to the left ; but encountered a desperate resistance from 
Tippoo’s troops, who evinced great gallantry and devotion to the sultaun.” 

Thus fell Seringapatam. The fate of Tippoo was sufficiently tragical. He fought bravely to the 
last, supported by some devoted followers, who resolved to perish with their royal master : and fell a 
victim to the vengeance of an enraged British soldier, whom he wounded in the knee when seeking to 
despoil him of some of his personal ornaments, and who, ignorant of his rank, instantly levelled at him 
his musket, and blew his brains out. 

The most ample acknowledgments of the merits and sei'vices of the Governor General were made by 
those who, before success had crowned his efforts, had expressed the strongest opinions against the 
course of action upon which he had resolved. No one saw any thing but certain destruction to British 
power in the inaction which they recommended, or could speak of Lord Wellesley’s bold and vigorous 
measures but with a sentiment of the most exalted admiration. If, at the commencement of the 
campaign, he had his anxieties, now, verily, he had his reward. 

Nor is it to be omitted, even in the briefest account of the Indian administration of this distinguished 
nobleman, that he declined, from motives of delicacy, to accept one hundred thousand pounds, which 
was proposed to be allocated to his use from the prize money of Seringapatam : a striking proof of his 
lofty disdain of personal considerations when placed in a high public trust, and which, it is to be 
lamented, was not exhibited by others, whose grasping eagerness for a disproportioned share of the 
booty obtained in Tippoo’s capital, is in painful contrast with the gallantry by which it was captured. 

The Governor General’s attention was now earnestly bent upon the settlement of the newly acquired ter- 
ritories, and such improved relations with the neighbouring states as might be a guarantee for future peace. 

Having been successful in his Indian measures beyond what his most sanguine hopes could have 
anticipated, and added to the Company’s possessions an extent of territory which rendered them ten 
times more valuable than they were before, he has been accused of ambition and tyranny in his dealings 
with the native princes, and it J^as been more than insinuated that, being without any real cause of 
complaint, he sought for pretexts of hostility for the purpose of accomplishing their subjugation. 

Had not Lord Wellesley been a conqueror, he would, in all human probability, have been a captive ; 
and had not the Company’s possessions been enlarged, the British would now have no footing in India. 

He found the seat of his government in peril, and its resources at the lowest ebb ; he left it in 
security and with flourishing revenues, more than sufficient for all its necessities ; nor should it be 
forgotten, even in the briefest sketch of the Indian administration of the remarkable man, that, having 
defeated his native enemies, and taken adecpiate precaution against a recurrence of hostilities on their 
parts, he was able to send a disposable force of eight thousand men, under General Baird, to co-operate 
with Lord Hutchinson in expelling the French from Egypt. 

He returned to England in January 1800, and found his illustrious friend, Wm. Pitt, fast approach- 
ing to his latter end. The Marquis has left on record a sketch of his character, which will be read with 
unmixed pleasure by the lovers of real greatness. Our space does not permit us to quote it at length, 
but we must make room for a single paragraph, in which an effectual negative is put upon those 
suspicions respecting his religious belief, which might be contracted from the brilliant ramblings of 
Lady Hester Stanhope, as well as the more saintly inuendoes of that excellent man, Mr. Wilberfore. 
Upon this subject Lord Wellesley may well be supposed to speak with authority : — • 

“ He had received regular and systematic instruction in the principles of the Christian religion, and 
in the doctrine and discipline of the Church of England, and in every branch of general ecclesiastical 
history. His knowledge on those subjects was accurate and extensive. He was completely armed against 
all sceptical assaults, as well as against all fanatical illusion ; and, in truth, he was not merely a faithful 
and dutiful, but a learned member of our Established Church, to which he was most sincerely attached, 
with the most charitable indulgence for all dissenting sects. 

“ No doubt can exist in any rational mind that this early and firm settlement of his religious opin- 
ions and principles was a main cause of that cheerful equanimity, which formed the great characteris- 
tic of his social intercourse, and which was never affected by adversities nor troubles.” 

In the year 1821, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland ; at the time he had to administer 
its government under the reform act, and found a tribunician power which more than counteracted all 
his efforts for the public tranquillity. 

A\ ith a great respect for the Christian religion, and we believe, a general conviction of its truth, w r e 
look in vain, in his life and conversation, for any proof that he entertained more than a speculative 
belief, in the mysteries of redemption ; aud what is most painful, as he advanced into the shade of a lorn- 
evening, there seemed to us to be less and less evidence, that faith, in the evangelical sense of the word° 
was realized. 


02 


ST. PETER’S CHURCH, FORT WILLIAM. 


His circumstances were far from easy ; and then it was, and not until then, that the East India 
Directors nobly came forward and proffered for his acceptance a sum of twenty thousand pounds, as 
a small token of their sense of his merits and his sacrifices, while maintaining their interests in India. 
His despatches were ordered to be printed for distribution in the three Presidencies ; and a marble statue 
erected to his honour in the India House, in England as “ a public, conspicuous, and permanent mark 
of the admiration and gratitude of the East India Company.” He died at his residence, Kingston 
House, Brompton, on the morning of Monday, 26th of September, 1842, in the 82nd year of his age | 
and according to a desire expressed in his will, his remains were deposited within the precincts of his 
beloved Eton, the Seminary in which he had received his early education. The following lines were 
written in 1840 ; they are in reply to some complimentary verses addressed to him, by the present 
Provost of Eton, Dr. Hodgson, upon receiving his bust, which has been placed in the College Library ; 
and happily express the sentiment with which that ancient seat of learning, which witnessed the tri- 
umphs of his youth, continued to be regarded by him in his old age : — 

“ Affulsit mihi supremae meta ultima Famae : 

Turn mihi cum lauro juncta cupressus erit : 

Mater amata meam quas fovit Etona juventam. 

Ipsa recedentem signat honore seuem.” 

SAINT PETER’S CHURCH, FORT WILLIAM. 

Sacred to the Memory of the undermentioned officers of Her Majesty’s tenth regiment, who died 
while stationed in this garrison, and whose bodies are interred in the Military Burial Ground, Ahpore : — 

Lieutenant-Colonel Gervase Power, who died 30th December 1842, aged 40 years. 

Major Saville Broom, who died 16th December 1842, aged 43 years. 

Major Thomas Beech Lennox Galloway, who died ‘26th December 1842, aged 47 years. 

Lieutenant Hampden Fitzgerald, who died 2nd January 1843, aged 21 years. 

Pay-Master Francis Augustus Cook, who died 18th March 1843, aged 31 years. 

This tablet is erected by their brother officers, in deep regret for their loss and as a mark ot the respect 

and esteem in which they were held. 


In testimony of affection and regret, this Tablet 

is dedicated to the Memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas John Anquetil, 44th Regiment B. N. I. 
who was massacred in the performance of his duty, during the insurrection at J ugdulluck, in Afghanistan, 
at Cabool, while commanding Shah Soojah’s force, on the 12th January, 1842, aged 60 years. 

He was an officerof undoubted ability, and highly versed in the science of Military tactics ; was warm-hearted 
and possessed of the strictest integrity, and the most honorable feeling. Erected by his surviving Son, 

Charles Anquetil. 


Sacred to the Memory of the undermentioned officers of the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers, 
who died whilst serving with their corps, in the Presidency of Fort William : — 
Lieut. Wm. Macknight, died 7th May, 1840. 

Lieut. Peter Craufurd, died 29th May, 1840. 

Lieut. Thomas Greene, died 12th Juue, 1840. 

Capt. Arthur IPestrange, died 14th July, 1840. 

Capt. G. "W. IMicholls, died 12th Augt. 1840. 

Capt. "W. H. Armstrong, died 29th Nov. 1841. 

This Monument is erected by their brother officers, as a mark of regard and esteem. 
Also to the Memory of Mrs. P. Craufurd and her daughter ; 

The wife and child of Lt. P. Craufurd, 21st R. S. Fusiliers, who died at 
Fort William in the beginning of May 1840. 


In Memory of Col. W. H. Dennie, C. B. 
of II. RI. 13th Light Infantry, who fell when leading a column 
Upon the Affghan force under Akbar Khan, before Jellalabad, 7th April 1842. 

Col. Dennie served under Lord Lake in 1805 and 1806. 

During the Burmese war he twice distinguished himself. At Ghuztiee on the 23rd July 1839. 

He led successfully the attack at Bamean ; on the 18th Sept. 1840, 

He defeated Dost Mahomed in the Khoord Cabul Pass; on the 12th Oct. 1841, 

After Major-General Sir R Sale was wounded, he directed the movements in a spirited manner. 

At Tazeen and Jugdulluck on the 22nd and 29th Oct. 1841, and between Gundamuck and Jellalabad, 
on the 12th Nov. 1841, he sustained his military reputation. At Jellalabad 
On the 1st Dec. 1841, and 11th March 1842, he led two successful sorties. 

This tablet is erected by the Commander-in-chief and officers of H. M. Army in India, to record the 

deeds of a brave Soldier. 


Lt.-Col. R. E. Chambers, 
Capt. E. M. Blair, 

Capt. J. Bott. 

Capt. P. S. Hamilton, 
Bt.-Capt. F. Collyer, 


In Memory of 

Surgeon E. F. Harpur, 

Lieut. H. Y. Bazett, 

Lieut. L. H. Hardiman, 

Veterinary Surgeon J. "Willis, 
Riding Master R. Quantrill, 


Of the 5th Regiment Bengal Cavalry, who, with almost the entire of the 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th troops of 
the corps, fell in gallant but hopeless conflict in the disastrous. retreat from Cabool, between the 

6th and 13th of January 1842. 

flie surviving officers of the regiment erect this tablet. The lamented brave whose deaths it records, 
though greatly outnumbered by a most treacherous foe in snowy wastes and rugged defiles, lor 
several days and nights together, without the shelter even of a tent, and suffering from the 
extremes of cold, hunger and thirst, in the depth of an Affghan winter, sold their lives 

dearly as became British soldiers. 

“ How are the mighty fallen, and the weapons of war perished,”— 11 Sam. v. 2, 7. 


ST. JAMES' CHURCH. 


63 


Sacred to the Memory of George Hamilton, Esq. Lt. 24th Regt. N. 1. 
Killed iti action at Moodkie, on the I9tli December 1845. 

Also of his sister, Eliza Euphemia, 
the beloved wife of Frederick Thornton Raikes, late Lt. 11. M. 62nd Regt, 
Died at Meerut, 16th March 1845. 

And to their young child, 

Margaret Georgiana Eleanor Raikes, 

Died at Umballah, 20th August, 1845. 


Sacred to the Memory of the European and Native officers, 
Non-commissioned officers and men, ot the filth Regiment ot Native Intantry, 
who fell in Afghanistan, in the year 1841 and 1842. 

Names. 


Lt.-Col. T. S. Oliver, 

Major S. Swayne, 

Capt. W. Mackintosh, 

„ C. W. Haig, 

„ R. M. Miles, 

,, L. B. Lock, 

,, F. W. Burkinyoung, 
Lieut. A. F. C. Deas, 


Lieut. "W. H. Tombs, 

„ C. B. Horsburgh, 

,, R. H. Alexander, 

,, F. H. Warren, 

,, A. D. Fotenger, 

Asst. Surgeon F. R. Metcalfe, 
Sergt. Major W. Godfrey, 

Qr. Mr. Sergt. H. Read. 


This Monument is erected by Major J. Jervis ; Capts. B. Bygrave, W. C. Birch, 
J C Salkeld R. Dowson ; Lieuts. E. S. Garstir, M. J. Slater, and C. C. Origan, 
the surviving officers of this ill-fated Regiment, 

To commemorate their regard for their fallen comrades. 


ST. JAMES’ CHURCH. 

CTHE REV. W. H. ROSS. — Chaplain of St. James' Church.) 

The Rev. William Hunter Ross, arrived in this country in December, 1843, and succeeded the 
Rev. Henry Thomas as Assistant Chaplain of St. James’ Church. For about two months he conducted 
the duties of his charge alone, till the arrival of the Rev. W. O. Ruspini, who was appointed his co-adjutor, 
as Senior Chaplain. After three or four months Mr. Ruspini was removed to the Cathedral, and for 
six weeks or two months previous to his demise he had again the sole charge. 

The deceased clergyman was of a very humble turn of mind, and his intercourse with his parislioners 
was characterized by great good nature. On Sunday the 4th August, he was at his post, and on 
Tuesday following he complained of feeling ill, and died the following day by an appoplexy. 


The folloiving is an Inscription placed in St. James' Church. 


Sacred to the Memory of Reverend "William Hunter Ross, 
Junior Chaplain at St James’ Church, 
who departed this life on the 7th August 1844, aged 36 years. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” — Rev. Chap 14, v. 13. 


ST. THOMAS’ CHURCH, FREE SCHOOL. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Mary Bird, 

By the junior members of this congregation, especially those of her own sex, in grateful and affectionate 
remembrance of her pious unwearied labours for their good. 

Born May 29th 1787 ; died May 29th, 1834. 

•“ The Righteous shall be held in everlasting remembrance.” — Ps. cxii. 6. 


MISS MARY BIRD. 

There are few occasions which remind us so forcibly of our own insignificance, as being called upon 
to record the departure from this world of those whose place we cannot see the means of supplying 
and such is pre-eminently the case with her whose lamented death is here noticed. All who knew 
or had even heard of Miss Bird, will readily confess no one exists in India on whom her mantle can 
fall — no one, who after seeing her exertions, can go and do likewise. It is not possible in this brief 
notice to say all that could be said of the deceased. Few lives could more beautifully exemplify the 
Christian character ; but it will be a melancholy satisfaction to her friends to see even an attempt to 
record her virtues. 

Miss Bird, the eldest daughter of Robert Bird, Esq. of Taplon, Bucks, devoted her time and 
talents during her early life to the instruction of the poor and ignorant in the neighbourhood in 
which her father resided ; but though much might be said of her labours in England, it is with 
her unwearied zeal in India, that we have now to do. She arrived in this country in 1823, and 


64 


ST. THOMAS’ CHURCH, FREE SCHOOL. 


proceeded to her brother, R. M. Bird, Esq. of the Civil Service, then stationed at Goruckpore, a 
place well suited to her taste. A Mission of the Established Church had already been formed there in 
which she immediately became warmly interested, and with the view of instructing the Native females 
connected with it, she commenced the stupy of liindoostanee. Her extreme quickness soon enbled her 
to make rapid progress, and besides assisting in superintending the boys’ schools, she collected one on 
her own premises for Native females ; she was thus occupied in the same benevolent way she had been 
in England, visiting and instructing the young and ignorant ; nor was this all, for her she commenced 
translating elementary works into Hindoostanee, and continued to devote some portion ot her tima 
daily to this useful employment till her lamented death. In this interval she paid some short visits to 
the neighbouring Missionary stations, and also to Calcutta, for the purpose of contributing to the com- 
fort of a younger brother suffering severely under the bereavement of an amiable wife, who fell a victim 
to cholera ; the same frightful disease that so suddenly terminated the life and labours of his admirable . 
sister. In 1830, she finally quitted Goruckpore and came to Calcutta with the intention of remaining 
as long as she could be useful ; and with a courage which those only who knew the real sensitiveness 
of her nature can estimate, she commenced seeking where she could do good, and when once this was 
found, nothing could deter her from prosecuting her labours, till fruits of success were visible. No 
power but love could thus have animated a feeble delicate and timid female. Love to God in the first 
place, love to her fellow-beings in the next, though most acutely alive to the opinions of those she 
lived amongst, she still pursued her way through evil report and good report. The path she marked 
out for herself, new and hitherto untrodden, was to visit in their homes, the numerous females descended 
from Christian parents, of whom Calcutta abounds, who speak Hindoostanee, but are totally unable 
to benefit by instruction in English, or read any language at all. To these persons Miss Bird was the 
messenger of glad tidings, explaining and teaching the Gospel of peace with such earnestness and 
sincerity, that she seldom failed to make a deep impression. She devoted Thursday evening in every 
week to the instruction of these Hindoostanee females at her own residence ; by degrees, the number 
increased, and in the afternoon of Sundays for two years past, they were joined by a few native 
converts under the instruction of a Christian Moulovee, who assisted, by reading the prayers and exposi- 
tion of scripture, which Miss Bird had previously prepared. At the time of her death, there were no 
less than fifty-five females who were thus receiving instruction in the way of life eternal. 

This work, alone would have satisfied many and would even have been too laborious for most, but it 
was only payt of her exertions for the benefit of others. Her method of communicating instruction 
was so happy that she was requested by several of the ladies conducting Schools in Calcutta to devote 
some time each week to imparting religious knowledge to their pupils, and this she most readily did. 
For the same purpose, she visited the Orphan School at Allipore ; she established a Bible class consisting 
of about 30 young Females, who regularly assembled every Monday evening. She offered her most 
cordial assistance in forming the Sunday School assembled at the Free School Church. She also once 
a week instructed a class of native boys under the care of the Christian Moulovee, in Geography. 
During this time her labours in English and Hindoostanee composition did not cease. Besides her 
Commentary on the book of Genesis, well calculated for the improvement of famalies and schools, she 
published both in English and Hindoostanee, “ England Delineated,” and fitted several valuable School 
books for more general use in India. She completed the outline of ancient History, and translated the 
whole of it into Hindoostanee. She finished a Tract on the Ten Commendments, which had been 
commenced at Gorruckpore, besides several smaller tracts. She translated also a small work on 
Geography of her own composition. Brewster’s valuable Treatise on Astronomy, with maps ; and was 
engaged on a History of England, which she had brought down to the reign of William the 2d, when 
she died. The above is a very imperfect sketch of what she did, and few can describe how she did it, or 
delineate all the excellencies of her character ; her mental powers were very uncommon ; she was ready 
at acquiring and retaining and applying knowledge. 

In translating the work on astronomy she encountered many mathematical difficulties, which were 
new to her, but till she fully understood them, she did not give up the study, nor attempt to continue 
the translation. As a remarkable instance of this, we may mention, that having to explain the compu- 
tation of the distance of the earth from the sun, she was not satisfied, till she had made herself mistress 
of the mathematical demonstration of the mode of doing so, by the transit of Venus, for the purpose of 
inserting it in her translation. She was perfectly conversant with the best English and French Authors, 
and possessed a fine taste. But all these literary qualifications, which would have been worthy of remark 
in others, were totally lost sight of in the superior excellencies of her character as a Christian. Jane 
Taylor remarks, what an honour to have been noted by St. Paul as one of the excellent and worthy 
women of his day, amongst such how pre-eminent would the deceased have been. Devoted in more 
than a common degree to her parents and family, dwelling with enthusiastic delight on their pleasures, 
and sympathising with their pains, she could still give up all for Christ. 

She could relinquish the comforts and elegancies of home and devote her time, her means, and her 
talents, to the poor and neglected of the land, and to imparting a knowledge of salvation to them that 
sit in darkness and the shadow of death. Her affections were as warm, her spirit as joyous, her heart 
as guileless as though she had never known the cares or sorrows of this world. Wherever she went 
she was a bond of union, and of love ; incapable of giving, she was equally slow at taking offence ; and 
would not believe that any one would willingly distress her. Delicately formed and exceedingly lame 
in consequence of an accident which occurred many years ago, her enthusiasm enabled her to endure 
such fatigue as many robust men would have shrunk from. The evening before her death, she passed at 
the Kidderpore Orphan School apparently in perfect health, or at least as well as any one could be, 
during the extreme heat of the weather. On retiring at night she felt indisposed, but delayed disturb- 
ing any one, or sending for medical aid, till near morning, when the fatal disease was confirmed. The 
usual remedies of cholera were tried, but she expired before 10 o’clock on the 29th of May, her 48th 
birth-day. She observed-to a venerable and most beloved and revered friend who visited lici bedside, 


ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH, KIDDERPORE. 


65 


that it was her birth- day. His reply was suited to the spirit of the suffering Christian, that it would 
most probably be her eternal birth-day. An affecting proof of the success of her labours, and the 
esteem in which she was held, w r as afforded by the crowds of old and yarung of the class, chiefly to 
whom her labours of love had been directed, that assembled at her funeral, all anxious to testify their 
affection and respect. 

It has thus been attempted most imperfectly to record some memorial of this truly excellent and 
devoted Christian. Whatever remains that we would have said, has been so beautifully expressed in the 
last Report of the Free School, that we cannot do better than conclude in its words : — 

“ The Governors cannot close this Report without adverting to the irreparable loss which the Free 
School has sustained by the sudden and unexpected death of Miss Mary Bird, one of their lady visitors. 
To her unweared diligence, active piety and cheerful disposition, no commendation of theirs can do 
justice.” Regardless of bodily weakness, and a climate quite enough to excuse inactivity, she went 
about doing good to those whom few care to seek after. From house to house, she carried consolation, 
teaching the young and the aged of her own sex, where without fear of disappointment, they might 
find rest to their souls, the unsearchable riches of Christ ; the faithful saying, that Jesus came into 
the world to save sinners, was her delightful theme. On this she loved to dwell with that happy 
cheerfulness of heart, which imparted a peculiar charm to her character and on the affections of all 
who listened to her discourse. On the Free School she conferred benefits, which will be remembered 
with lasting gratitude by many, long after their connection with the Institution has ceased. A week 
never passed in which she was not twice or thrice found seated among the children, patiently con- 
veying instruction, as though she had been a hired servant, rather than a gratuitous friend. One so dis- 
interested, so zealous, so indefatigable, so desirous of doing good, is seldom found. Her memory will be 
dear to a multitude of sorrowing friends, by whom she will be honoured as one of those excellent 
women who have privately laboured in the Gospel, and whose names are written in the Book of Life. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Anne, 
the dearly beloved wife of Thomas Kiernander, Esquire, J unior. 

Born at Allahabad 27th January 1821, 
and fell asleep in Jesus, at Calcutta, 28th November 1844. 

She has left two children to lament her loss, in common with her afflicted husband, who has placed this 

Tablet to her Memory. 

Blame not the Monumental stone I raise ; 

Mis to the Saviour’s, not the sinner’s praise. 

Sin was the whole that she could call her own ; 

Her good was all derived from him alone. 

To sin, her conflict, pain and grief she owed ; 

Her conqu’ring faith and patience He bestow’d. 

Reader, may’st thou obtain like precious faith 
To smile in anguish and rejoice in death. 


Sacred to the Memory of Captain James Minns Dicy, 
of H. Co.’s. Steamer “ Enterprize,” who died at sea 26th April 1845, aged 40 years. 

He served the H. E. I. Company upwards of 20 years, and distinguished himself in the war with China 
in command of the H. C. Steamer “ Madagascar,” until her loss by fire, on which occasion, as well 
as during his subsequent captivity in China, his conduct was the admiration of all around him. 

He is lamented by many beyond the circle of those of his own family. 

“ There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God.” — Heb. iv. 9. 


In Memory of Elizabeth, 

Wife of Charles Knowles Robinson, Esquire, one of the Magistrates of Calcutta. 

Born 8th Dec. 1803; died 29th Oct. 1837. 

She was loved in life. The Lord did guide her with his council and afterward received her to glory. 
“ Her children arise up and call her blessed. Her husband also, and he praiseth her.” 


ST. STEPHEN’S CHURCH, KIDDERPORE. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
the Rev. Walter Hovenden, B. D. 

9 years Chaplain to the Bengal Military Orphan Society ; 
died at sea 30th September 1832, aged 49. 

Emphatically the orphan’s friend ; beloved of all and regretted by all. 

I his humble tablet is erected by those sorrowing orphans, 

As a grateful record of affectionate remembrance cherished by them of their revered Pastor and friend. 
“ Feed my lambs, feed my sheep.”— -John xxi. 14, 15. 

“ The memory of the just is blessed.” — Prov. x. 7. 

[January 23rd, 1847.] 


To the Memory of Frederic Stainforth, Esq. of the B. C. Service, late Judge of Chittagong, 
i his house ot God owed much, in its commencement, to his 
zealous and benevolent exertions ; 

his valuable life, adorned, as it was, with the more mdd and gentle of the Christian virtues, 
Terminated at the premature age of 36 years. 

He died at Garden Reach on the 25th of September, 1845, 

In humble but sure hope of eternal life througdi Jesus Christ. 

" Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 

K 


66 


UNION CHAPEL, DHURRUMTOLLAIL 


ORPHAN BURIAL GROUND, KIDDERPORE SCHOOL. 

Sacred to the Memory ol Margaret, 

The wife of the Rev. W. Sturrock, Chaplain on the Bengal Establishment, 
who departed this life the 24th of April 1845, aged 28 years. 


To the Memory of Ann Sturrock, 

Twenty years a boarder, thirty a ward, and five Head-Mistress of this Institution. 

Died 9th of July 1843, aged 57. 


To the Memory of 
Anne Elizabeth Cresswell, 

Fifty years a ward of the M. O. S. 

Born January 1794 ; Died 5th March 1844. 


To the Memory of Maria 'Wiggins, 

Second daughter of the late Captain and Brevet Major F, S. Wiggins, 31st B. N. I. 
Born August 9th 1829; Died June 17th 1847, aged 17 years, 10 months, 8 days. 
Erected by her loving brother George. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Alexander Fergusson Dick, 

Born 22nd November 1820; Died 27th February 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of Aurelia Leila, 

Eldest daughter of Captain Stephen Davis Riley, of the Bengal Native Infantry, 
who departed this life on the twenty-eighth day of August, Anno domini 1820, 

Aged eleven years and seven months. 

To the sweet remembrance of an affectionate and amiable daughter this tribute of sincere regard. 


Master George James Cox, 

Died 3rd January 1823, aged 10 years and 7 months. 
Erected by Ann W. B. Cox. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Samuel Oldknow, 

Son of the late John Oldknow, Conductor of Ordinance, who departed this life on the 
15th of June 1824, aged 7 years 2 months. 


UNION CHAPEL, DIIURRUMTOLLAH. 

The inferior of this Chapel contains many plain but effecting memorials of the brevity of human life devo- 
ted to the noblest and best causes of Christian Missions, and which tells a sad tale as to the fearful nature 
of the climate in which these good men lived and died, and in which many are still permitted to labor and 
pray for the welfare of the people. 


To the Memory of the following Missionaries of the London Missionary Society, 
who having faithfully laboured in the service of Christ in this country. 

Died whilst prosecuting their important work : — 

Nathaniel Forsyth, arrived in India in 1798, died February 1816, Aged 47 years. 


Robert May, arrived in 1812. Died August 12, 1818. Aged 30. 

Robert Hampson, arrived in 1819. Died September 21, 1820. Aged 25. 

Wm. Bankhead, arrived in 1822. Died October 1822. Aged 23. 

Joseph 'Warden, arrived in 1822. Died April 21, 1831. Aged 27. 

J. D. Pearson, arrived in 1817. Died October 1831. Aged 41. 

Thomas Higgs, arrived in 1830. Died December 3, 1832. Aged 24. 

James Robertson, arrived in 1826. Died June 15, 1833. Aged 30. 


“ Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen, for by it the elders 
obtained a good report ; these all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen 
them afar off, and were persuaded of them and embraced them, and confessed that they were 
strangers and pilgrims on the earth.” — Ileb. xi. 1, 2, 13. 

This Tablet is erected by Christians of different denominations as an expression of respect for the Me- 
mory of brethren who were esteemed worthy to labour and die in the Missionary field. 


NATHANIEL FORSYTH . — (Minister in the Dutch Church , Chinsurah and Missionary of the 

London Missionary Society .) 

The Rev. N. Forsyth was born in the year 1769, at Smalholm Bank, Dumfries-shire. 

In 1797 he was accepted as a candidate for Missionary labours in conjunction with the Rev. J. Ed- 
mond ; be arrived in India the following year, and commenced his ministrations in Dr. Dunwiddee’s 
lecture-room in the Cossitollah. His attention was afterward directed to Chinsurah, where there was 
no regular clergyman ; he sought and obtained permission to officiate in the settlement Church there, 
where his diligent ministrations were greatly blessed of God to the edification of his hearers, and the 
promotion of a spirit of piety amongst the people. 



UNION CHAPEL, DHURRUMTOLLAH. 67 

In 1809, he engaged, in conjunction with Dr. Carey, in opening the Lall Bazar Chapel, in which he 
continued to preach during the evening of the Lord’s-day to the close of his life. In his character he 
seemed to yield an exception to the almost universal applicability of the declaration of Solomon, that 
the “ fear of man bringeth a snare and he was quite content to maintain that course invariably allot- 
ted to the Christian Missionary, if he be a faithful one. “ He was gentle unto all men, apt to teach pati- 
ent ; in meekness instructing those who oppose themselves, if peradventure God would give them 
repentance to the acknowledgment of the truth.” 

It was not until the last year of his life, that he was the subject of sickness ; during that year, he 
declined rapidly, and on the morning of the 11th February, 1816, his spirit departed. 

A stone in the Chinsurah Burying Ground marks the spot where his ashes sleep. 


REV. CHARLES PIFFARD . — ( Missionary of the London Missionary Society, died December 

llth, 1840.) 

Through the political events of the period, Charles Piffard in his youth was compelled to reside with 
his family in France for many years ; on the return of peace, he returned to England and entered his 
father’s counting-house. One Sabbath-day, excited by curiosity, he entered the Rev. J. Yockney’s 
church Islington ; he was led to perceive that there was more in religion than he had up to that time been 
apt to suppose, and retired in a thoughtful mood ; the next day he procured a Bible, and it was not long 
i ere the word of God produced its effects ; he was led to embrace the Saviour in faith, and had pardon 
and peace, imparted to his soul through the blood of the cross. He became zealous for the Lord ; and 
to advance his glory, was the most anxious desire of his heart. He gave a proof of it, when he devo- 
ted himself to the work of a Missionary, at a time, when the sacred office was far from being popular, 
and when he had the fairest prospects at home. He went through his theological studies in Glasgow 
University, and at the Missionary College at Gosport. For upwards of 15 years he laboured among 
the heathen, in various ways, and by various means, and not without success. Trusting upon the 
Lord for his blessing, he undertook all that God gave him an opportunity to undertake ; he esta- 
blished and superintended schools, wrote and translated and distributed tracts ; and as a preacher in 
: the native language, he was one of the ablest, most zealous, active and persevering Missionaries that 
ever came to India. Mr. Piffard never drew any stipend from the Missionary Society ; but support- 
ed himself from his own means, which were ample, and with which besides, he did much good when- 
ever an opportunity offered. 

His remains were interred in the Scotch Burial Ground. 

A marble tablet is placed to his Memory in the Union Chapel, and the following Inscription is 
taken from it : 

To the Memory of the Rev. Charles Piffard, 

who for 15 y«ars laboured gratuitously in Bengal as a Missionary of the London Missionary Society. 

He died on the llth December 1840, aged 42 years. 

“ He was a good man, full of faith, and of the Holy Ghost.” 

His exemplary piety, especially manifested in his humility, catholicity, benevolence, and untiring zeal 
in the cause of Christ, secured for him the love and esteem of Christians of all denominations, who 
have united in erecting this Tablet, as an expression of their affection for one who consecrated 
his life and property to the best interests of his fellow-men. 

Mr. Piffard was 12 years co-pastor of the Native Churches at Rammakal Choke, and Gungree. 

The tender and faithful manner in which he discharged the duties of his office gained for him the respect 
of the heathen, the confidence of his brethren in the Mission, and the affection of all the members 

of his charge. 

“ A beloved brother and a faithful minister and fellow servant in the Lord.” — Col. iv. 7. 


“ Remember them who have spoken unto you the word of God ; whose faith follow considering the end 
of their conversation, Jesus Christ, the same yesterday to-day and for ever.” 

In furtherance of the apostolic injunction, and of our Christian love for the late 

Rev. Samuel Trawin, 

Missionary to the Heathen, who died at Moorshedabad, 
on the 3rd of August 1827, aged 32. 

T his Tablet is erected. 

“ He was a good man full of the Holy Ghost and of faith.” 

“ And we beseech you brethren to know them which labour among you and are over you in the Lord 
and admonish you and to esteem them very highly in love for their works’ sake.’’— Amen. 


In Memory of Radanath Doss, 

A sincere and exemplary convert from Hinduism, 

For upwards of 12 years a faithful, discreet and truly useful Christian Catechist and Missionary to the 
heathen in connexion with the London Missionary Society. 

He fell asleep in Jesus on the 2nd April 1844, aged 29 years. 

“ A brand plucked out of the burning.” 


REV. J. KEITH. 

On Monday the 7th October, 1822, Rev. Mr. Keith fell asleep in the bosom of his Redeemer. His 
loss had not only been felt by the London Missionary Society to which he belonged, but by the Christian 
community at large. Could the native population of India become sensible of how sincere a friend 
Providence has called from labour to eternal rest, they also would deeply regret his decease A 
more zealous friend of the heathen — a man more concerned for the welfare of the institution to which 


C8 


ST. ANDREW'S KIRK. 



lie was attached, and a more indefatigable labourer in the vineyard of his Lord, the page of history has 
seldom to record. 

On this occasion we adopt the melancholy strains of Abnei’s dirge, and join the Royal mourner in 
exclaiming, “ A great man has fallen in Israel.” The Rev Mr. Keith had just attained the sixth 
year of his missionary labours in Calcutta, when the messenger of Jehovah announced the period of his 
departure, and dropped the veil which separates the unseen world from that which we inhabit between 
him and us. During his short career he may be said, in conjunction with the Rev H. Townley, to have 
laid the foundation of a mission in the metropolis of India, not very inferior in importance and magni- 
tude to any in the world. A Church had been formed, a congregation collected., and a spacious house 
of worship, called Union Chapel, has been erected ; in the labour of which he bore, if not the principal, 
yet no inconsiderable portion. He shared the duties of the English services with the co-pastors of Union 
Chapel, and was occupied almost every evening in communicating instruction to the natives, and in pastor- 
al visits to the flock of which God had made him an overseer. He studied with commendable persever- 
ance, the Bengalee and Hindoostanee languages, and composed various tracts, which he published in each 
of them. He possessed so much decision of character, and perseverance in the plans which he formed, 
that seldom any difficulties diverted him from his object. It cannot, however, be imagined that the 
deceased was free from infirmities, and we recollect that the Rev. IJ. Townley, when paying the last 
tribute to his memory, before a numerous and affected audience, said, “ Were I to affirm concerning my 
departed brother that he was perfect whilst on earth, he himself, from the excellent glory, would be the 
first to confront me with the words of the Apostle, ‘ If we say we have no sin we deceive ourselves, 
and the truth is not in us.’ But we desire not to discry those spots of imperfection which are lost in 
the splendour of his disinterested benevolence and truly philanthrophic exertions, to which he became 
a myrtyr. 

The following is the Inscription to his memory placed in the Union Chapel : — 

In Memory of the Rev. James Keith, 

Joint-Pastor of the Church of Christ assembling in this place, and Missionary to the Heathen. 

This Tablet, as an expression of regard and grateful remembrance, is by the 
Members of the Church erected. 

He departed this life 8th October 1822, aged 38 years. 

“ They that turn many to righteousness shall shine as the stars for ever and ever.” 


REVEREND R. DeRODT.— Late Missionary of the London Missionary Society. 

Mr. deRodt was born in Switzerland, February 2d, 1814. He received a classical education in the 
College at Berne, where he became acquainted with five or six students who were united together by 
the bonds of Christian friendship. And it was undoubtedly in consequence of his piety, that when it 
became necessary for him to chose a profession, he resolved to devote himself to the ministry of the 
Gospel, and for that purpose he proceeded to Geneva to pursue the requisite studies. He there deter- j 
mined on the Missionary work, and in 1835, visited England. He sailed from Liverpool in company 
with two other Missionaries, and arrived at Calcutta in 1836. He commenced his labours at Sona- ■ 
mooky, but in 1838, returned to Calcutta. He delighted in itinerating labours, and made several 
extensive tours through various parts of Bengal and the adjacent Provinces. He was one of the most 
active members of the Missionary body in Calcutta, and from his youthful age and vigour of constitu- 
tion, it was hoped from the commencement of his valuable labours, that he would prove of greater use- 
fulness in future years. His course however was cut short, apparently through his zeal for the good 
cause in which he laboured ; having set out on a visit to some schools in the Soonderbuns, he caught 
the jungly fever, which terminated his life in a few days. His remains were interred in the Scotch 
Burial Ground orf Calcutta ; a Marble Tablet is erected in the Union Chapel with the following Inscrip- 
tion : — 

In Memory of the Rev. Rodolph de Rodt, 

A Missionary of the London Missionary Society. 

This Tablet is erected by his attached friends of different denominations. 

He was a faithful servant of Christ; humble, frank, peaceable and laborious; endowed with many talents, 
natural and acquired, which he devoted to the one great object of promoting the glory of his Master, 
by making known his blessed Gospel among the Natives of this Heathen land. 

He was born at Berne, February 2, 1814 ; landed in India April 1 1, 1836, 

And slept in Jesus August 29, 1843. 

“ He was a good man, and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith.”— Acts. xi. 24 v. 


ST. ANDREW’S KIRK. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charlotte, 

Wife of James Forlong, Esq. 

Died at Mulnauth, 13th March, 1844, in the 24th year of her age. 

This Tablet is erected by a few friends by whom she was greatly esteemed and beloved while she lived, 
on account of her rare sweetness of disposition and excellence of character, and who now 

mourn her early death. 

“ Favor is deceitful and beauty is vain, but a woman that feareth the Lord she shall be praised,”— 

Prov. xxxi. c. 30 v. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


69 


In Memory of Colonel William Dunlop, 

Quarter-Master General of the H. E. I. Company’s Bengal Army. 

Born March 16, 1785, at Whitmuirhall, Parish of Selkirk, county of Roxburgh ; 

Died November 5, 1841, at Allahabad, 

In progress to Simlah with the Commander-in-Chief. 

This Tablet has been erected by a few of his friends in testimony of the affectionate regard with which they 
cherish the remembrance of his amiable qualities, genuine kindliness and solid worth. 

“ There is no discharge in that war.” — Eccles. viii. c. 8. v. 

“ Prepare to meet thy God.”— Amos, iv. c. 12. v. 


To the Memory of James Brown, D. D. 

Junior Minister of this Church. 

Born at Annan, Dumfrieshire, 1786; 

Began his ministry in this place April 1823 ; 

Died off Malacca 23rd September 1830. 

A man of genuine truth and benevolence, and of unwearied zeal in the cause of religion. 

“ I have not hid thy righteousness within my heart ; I have declared thy faithfulness and thy salvation ; I 
have not concealed thy loving kindness and thy truth from the great congregation.” — Ps, xl. ver. 10. 


In Memory of Donald Macleod, M. D. 

Inspector-General of H. M. Hospitals in India. 

This Tablet has been erected by a few of his personal friends, to record their sense of his worth as a man 

and of his merits as an officer. 

Born at Bernisdale, Inverness-shire. 

Died at Calcutta 12th November 1840. 

“ He that is our God is the God of salvation, and unto God the Lord belong the issues of death.” — Ps. lxviii.20. 


James Shaw, Esq. a Judge of the Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawlut of this Presidency ; 

Died at sea, August 31st, 1842. JEt : 42. 

This stone is placed here in token of esteem and effectionate regard by his friends in the Civil Service. 
“ To the Memory of the just is blessed.” — Prov. x. 7. 

Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Garden, Esq. M. D.” — Presidency Surgeon, 
who after a course of professional exertion marked by great kindness, assiduity and skill, departed 

this life the fifty-first year of his age. 

Born at Aberdeen, October 4th 1794 ; Died at Calcutta April 24th, 1845. 

His Friends have raised this 1’ablet in testimony of affection and respect. 

“ Be ye therefore ready also : for the Son of man cometh at an hour when ye think not.” — Luke xii. 40, 


/ 

THE SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 

This Ground was opened on August the 25th, 1767, for the remains of Mr. John Wood, a writer in 
the Council House, whose tomb was levelled to make way for the western cross road. The oldest 
Monument that now bears an Inscription is that 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Pearson, 

Ob. 8th of September, 1768. JEt: 19. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Sykes, 

wife of Francis Sykes, Esq. 
who died the 28th of December 1768, 
In the 25th year of her age. 
Joined to a life of virtue must 
ever make her husband and 
her children feel, and her 
friends, lament her loss. 


In Memory of Mrs. Alice Walter, 
who died December 10th, 1769. 
Lamented by her husband and all her friends. 


In Memory of Lucia, 
wife of Robert Palk, Esq. 

Daughter of the Rev. Dr. Stonhouse ; 

Born at Northampton 26th November 1747, 
deceased June 22nd 1772. 

What needs the emblem ; what the plaintive strain ; 
What all the art that Sculpture e’er express’d. 

To tell the treasure that these walls contain. 

Let those declare it most who knew it best; 

The tender pity she would oft betray 
Shall be with interest at her shrine return’d ; 
Connubial love, connubial tears repay, 

And Lucia lov’d shall still be Lucia mourn’d ! 

Tho’ grief will weep and friendship heave the sigh ; 


Tho’ wounded memory the fond tear shall shed ; 
Yet let not fruitless sorrow dim the eye 
To teach the living, die the sacred dead 
Tho’ clos’d the lips tho’ stopp’d the tuneful breath. 
The silent clay cold monitress shall teach, 

In all th’ alarming eloquence of death. 

With double pathos to the heart shall preach, 

Shall tell the virtuous maid, the faithful wife’ 

If young and fair, that young and fair was she. 

Then close the useful lesson of her life 

And tell them what she is they soon must be. 


In Memory of Mrs. Mary Smith, 
who departed this life the 3rd September 1773, 
in the 23rd year of her age. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Marg-. Dickson, 

wife of Captain Thomas Dickson, 
and daughter to Mr. James Bail lie, 
who died the 30th Sept. 1774, 
in the 25th year of her age. 

Sacred to conjugal affection 
this Monument was erected by 
her disconsolate husband. 

Her virtuous conduct and tender affection 
as a wife are proofs of what she would 
have been as a parent had it pleased 
Providence to spare her. 

This mouldering Tomb may 
for a while preserve her name, but the 
memory of her virtues live in the hearts 
ot her friends. 


70 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Frances Mellish j 
died the 3d Nov. 1774, aged 22 years. 


To the Memory of 

Lieutenant-Colonel Janies Eillyman, 
Chief Engineer in the Company’s Service 
at Bengal ; 

who died the 23rd day of December 1774, 
aged 42 years. 


Here lieth the body of 

Tyso Saul Hancock, Esq. 
who died 5th Nov. 1775, aged 64 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Joseph Law, 

a writer in the Honorable Company’s Service; 
who died sincerely regretted by his friends, 
on the 11th day of February 1776. 


'Here lieth 
Charles Edman, 

who was born in Gothenburg, 
in the kingdom of Sweden. 

He was the son of 
the Rev. Dean John Edman, 
and departed this life on the 20th of March 1776, 
at Calcutta, in the kingdom of Bengal. 

This Monument was erected 
by his disconsolate widow. Aura de Barros. 


Here lies entered the remains of 
Eleanor 'Watson, 
born the 6th of May 1751, 
and died the 19th of October 1776 ; 
and also of 

Samuel Watson, her son, 
born 11th of October and died the 25th. 
Here also lyeth the body of 
Mrs. Mary Chapman, 
who departed this life on the 23d of January 
in the year of our Lord 1784, aged 63 years, 
Universally lamented by all 
that knew her, 

being a pattern of Virtue, Piety, 
Charity and Friendship. 

No empty form of words are here expressed. 
But simple truth as it ’s by nature dressed. 


Here lies the body of 

Thomas Price, Esq. 

who departed this life the 11th November 1776. 


To the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Brown, 

who departed this life 
the 10th day of December 1776, 
in the 36th year of his age. 

And what is friendship but a name ; 
A charm that lulls to sleep ; 

A shade that follows wealth or fame, 
But leaves the wretch to weep. 


To the Memory of 

Sir John Clavering, 

Knight of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, 
Lieut. -Genl. in his Britannic Majesty’s Service ; 
and Colonel of the 52d Regiment of Foot, 
second in the Supreme Council of 
Fort William in Bengal, 
and Commander-in Chief of 
all the Company’s forces in India. 

Died August 30th, 1777, 
in the 55th year of his age, 
and was interred here. 


Henry Wedderburn, 

many years Master Attendant at Calcutta, 
served the Hon. E. I. Company 
in the troubles with 

Surajah-Ul-Dowlah and Cossim Ally Cawn. 
Departed this life the 17th November, 1777 
much esteemed and lamented 
by all who knew him ; 
aged 46 years. 

His widow, as a mark of 
her affection and gratitude, 
erected this Monument to his Memory. 


To the Memory of 
Henry Scott, 

Son of Capt. John Scott, 
died the 3d of June 1779, aged 2£ years. 


The remains of 
John Holme, Esq. 
of the City of Carlisle, Cumberland, 
who died the 2d day of January, 1779, 
are here deposited, 
aged 40 years. 

This Monument was erected to 
perpetuate the memory of a sincere friend 
and honest man by his surviving friends, 
as a testimony of their regard for his virtues. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Stafford Play dell, Esq. 
Member of the Board of Trade ; 

Master in Chancery and 
Superintendant of Police in Calcutta, 
who departed this life on the 29th of May 1779, 
Sincerely and universally regretted 
by Europeans and Natives. 


This Tomb was erected 
by Lieut. William Forster, 
in Memory of his brother. 
Ensign Js. Forster, 
who died the 30th of August 1779, 
Aged 26 years. 

Also his only son 
Fred. Stuckley Forster, 
who was born the 22d of July, 1776, 
and died the 16th of July, 1780. 


To the Memory of 
Capt. David Smith, 

2nd Brigade. 

Obt. 15th Sept. 1779, FEtatis 32 years. 


To the Memory of 
George Hurst, Esq. 
who died February 24th 1780, aged 38 years. 
Much lamented by all his friends. 


To the Memory of 

Elizabeth, 

Wife of Capt. Benjamin Wroe ; 
a lady endowed with every social virtue •, 
departed this life March 10th, 1780, 
aged 27 years. 


To the Memory of 
Lieut. -Col. Benjamin Wilding, 
Obiit. 30th of August, 1780, Hitatis 45 years. 


To the Memory of 
Charles Pipon, Esq. 
who died September 18th, 1780, aged 32 years. 


In Memory of 
Mary Bowers, 

who died the 4th of March 1781, 
in the 55th year of her age. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


71 


la sincere attachment 
to the Memory ot 
Mr. George Bogle, 
late Ambassador to Tibet, 
who died the 3d of April 1781. 

This Monument is erected 
by his most affectionate friends 
David Anderson and Claud Alexander. 


Miss Reb. Vaughan, 

died 4th of August 1781, aged 8 years. 

* 1 *- ^ In Memory of /) ‘ M 

Thomas Pearson, f 

, ^ L Ob. 5th of August 1781, /£t. 42. 

2/ In Memory of 

Lieut. Lewis Mordaunt, 

who departed this life 19th of September 1781, 
In the 22nd year of his age. 


In Memory of 

Captain Alphin McGregor, 

Ob. 25th of August 1781, JEt. 34 years. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Harding, 

died October the 3d, 1781, aged 50 years. 


In Memory of 
Mr. Wm. Wilkins, 

Commander of Stores ; 
died 25th of November 1781, aged 33 years, 
much regretted by his friends. 

He was an affectionate husband, 
fond parent and warm friend. 

Also Miss Elizabeth 'Wilkins, 
died 23d Jan. 1779 ; 

Augusta Ann 'Wilkins, died 16th August, 

1781, aged 9 days. 

Master H. W. Wilkins, 

died October the 4th, 1781, 
aged 19 months and 13 days, 
being three of his children. 


In Memory of 

Anne Chambers, 

who died 7th February 1782, aged 69 years, 
and of two of her grand children, 
Henrietta Chambers, 
who died 30th of July 1779 aged 4 months. 
And Edward Colin Chambers, 
who died 9th November 1781, aged 6 months ; 
Being children of 
Sir Robert Chambers 
and Frances his wife. 

Also in Memory of 
Jane Marriot, 
an infant about 18 months old, 
who died 23d November 1781. 


In Memory of 
Lieut. John Elwood, 

of the 1st brigade ; 

Obiit. 1st of March 1782, Hit. 26. 


In Memory of 
Miss Mary Ann Bird, 

born ye 11th of April 1788, 
and departed this life 
the 28th of May in the same year. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
the Rev. Thomas Yates, 
many years chaplain to this Presidency, 
who died on the 14th of April 1782. 
His amiable and chearful disposition 
procured him the esteem and friendship 
of the public in general 
and his many private virtues 
will ever be remembered 
by those of his more intimate 
acquaintance, who in his death 
lamented the loss of an honest man. 


In Memory of 

Capt. William Swallow, 

who died the 25th ot April MDCCLXXXII, 
aged L1X years, 
and lies here interred. 


In Memory of 
Captain John Grant, 

wdio died 28th April 1782, aged 32 years. 
The sweet companion and the friend sincere 
Need no Mechanic help to force the tear ; 
In heartfelt numbers never want to shine 
’Twill flow eternal o’or a hearse like thine. 


Here lyeth the body of 
Mr. John Boulton, 
who departed this life 
the 31st day of July 1782, aged 42 years, 
much regretted by all his acquaintance. 


In Memory of 

Lieut.-Col. Alexander Hannay, 

died the 4th of September 1782, aged 46 years. 


Here lies the body of 

James Kerr, 

Surgeon in the service of the East India 
Company upon the Bengal Establishment, 
and distinguished as well by his Medical 
knowledge as by his improving the arts 
and enriching science by his 
discoveries in India ; 
he departed this life on the 
17th September 1782, yEt. 44 years. 

And under this Monument is also 
interred his infant son, born on the 
30th September 1782, and w'ho only survived to 
the 5th of October of the same year. 


To the Memory of 

Thomas Fitsmaurice Chambers, 

son of Sir Robert and Lady Chambers, 
born on the 28th Oct. MDCCLXXVI. 
w ho was shipwrecked in the “ Grosvenor” and 
perished on the coast of Africa in August 1782. 


Mr. William Chambers, Prothonotary 
and Persian Interpreter to the Supreme 
Court of Judicature in Bengal ; by 
whose death the interests of 
true religion in India and the 
concerns of the Calcutta Mission in 
particular experienced a considerable loss. 
He died on the 22nd August 1793, 
and was interred in the above 
Tomb of his family. 


In Memory of 

Mr. Archibald Crawford, 

died the 3rd of November 1782, yEtat 36 years. 


In Memory of 
Captain David Phillips, 

died the 7th of November 1782, aged 64 years. 


To the Memory of 
Thomas Powney, Esq. 
who departed this life 
the 10th November 1782, aged 61 years. 
Here lies the tenderest husband, father, friend • 
His life with goodness mark’d with grief Ins end • 
His mind was calm, oh may his soul have rest * 
And he who others bless’d himself be bless ’d. 

He gave to every Christian virtue scope, 

And what his practice was, is now his hope. 




72 


SOUTH TARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Barclay. 

died the 12th of November 1782, At. t. 62 years. 


To the Memory of 

Alexander Story, 

who departed this life the 29th December 1782, 
aged 9 years and 3 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry "Walter, (infant,) 
who died the 30th June 1783, aged 18 months, 
and also Edward, his brother, who died 
the 3rd September 1783, aged 9 months. 


Here lieth the body of 
Charles Frederick Smith, M. D. 

Missionary of the Brethren’s Church; 

born the 11th September 1746, 
departed this life the 31st August 1783. 


Sacred to the Memory of an honest man, 
this humble stone records the name and fate, 
(the latter, alas! how unequal to his worth) of 
Richard Becher, Esq., 
late Member of the Board of Trade ; 
and once of the Council of this Presidency. 
Thro’ a long life passed in the service 
of the Company, what his conduct was 
the annals of the Company will shew. 

On this tablet sorrowing friendship tells, 
that having reached, in a modest independence, 
what he deemed the honorable reward 
of a life of service to enjoy it ; 
he returned in the year 1774 to his native land, 
where private esteem and public confidence 
awaited, but where misfortune also overtook him. 
By nature, open, 

liberal and compassionate ; unpractised 
in guile himself and not suspecting it 
in others, to prop the declining credit of a friend, 
he was led to put his all to hazard 
and fell the victim 
of his own benevolence ; 
after a short pause and agonizing conflict, 
bound by domestic claims to fresh exertions; 
in 1781 

he returned to the scene of his earlier efforts, 
but the vigour of life was past, 
and seeing thro’ the calamity of the times 
his prospects darken, in the hopeless 
efforts to re-erect the fortunes of his family, 
under the pang of disappointment, 


and the pressure of the climate ; 
a worn mind and debilitated body, 
sunk to rest. 

Unerring wisdom ordained, 
that his reward should not be of this world, 
and removed him to an eternity of happiness, 
Nov. 17th, 1782; zEtat suae 61. 


To the Memory of 

Mr. James Le Gros, 

Obt. Sept. 22, 1783. JEt. 24 Years. 


At the instance of Capt. r Ihos. Larkins, 
and to the Memory of 
Thomas Poynting, Esq. „ 
Commander of the Ship “ Resolution, 
in the service of the United Company of 
Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies, 
who most bravely defended 
the “ Resolution” against thirty sail of the Mahratta 
fleet. 

lie died esteemed and honored by those who knew 
him, 

The 28th day of August 1783, aged 53 Years. 


Here lyeth interred the body of 

Mary Castleman, 

who departed this life the 22nd of March 1784, 
aged 4 1 Years. 


In Memory of 
John Sampson, Esq., 
who departed this life on the 
1st of October 1783, aged 47 Years. 

This Monument a hopeless widow rears. 

To prove her love and to record her tears : 

’Tis her’s on lasting marble to attest, 

How good her husband was, herself how bless’d. 
Yet for these virtues mercy will be shown ; 

What caused her happiness will cause his own. 


To the Memory of 
Mr. Favell Wordsworth, 

who died the 17th Dec. 1783, 
aged 23 Years. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Charlotte Hickey, 

Wife of Wm. Hickey, Esq., 
who died the 25th of December 1783, 

Aged 21 years, 10 months and 10 days, 
leaving a truly disconsolate husband, 
bitterly and incessantly to deplore the loss of her. 


AUGUSTUS CLEVELAND ESQ. late of the Bengal Civil Service. 

His assiduity in discharging the laborious duties of his station, had so much impaired his consti- 
tution, that he was under the necessity of trying a |sea voyage for the recovery of his health, but un- 
fortunately without success, as he expired a few days after his embarkation. The Governor General 
deeming the services performed by Mr. Cleveland, in cultivating and conciliating the minds of the 
inhabitants of the districts under his charge of such importance to the peace of the country, the 
security of the revenue, the credit of the English name, and the principles of humanity, as to merit 
a public and lasting commemoration of them — for the honor of his reputation and for an example to 
others, directed a Monument to be erected to his memory at the public expense. The following In- 
scription is engraven on his Tomb, containing a short specification of those services : — 


Here lie the remains of 
Augustus Cleveland, Esquire, 
late Collector of the Revenues ; 

Judge of the Dewanny Adawlut of the 
Districts of Bhaugulpore, Monghyr, Rajmahal, 
&c. &c. 

He departed this life 12th January 1784, at sea 
onboard the “ Atlas” Indiaman, Captain Cooper, 
proceeding to the Cape for the recovery'ol his health, 
aged 29 Years. 

His remains, preserved in spirits, were brought 
up to town in the Pilot sloop which attended the 
“ Atlas,” 


and interred here on the 30th of the same month. 
The public and private virtues of this excellent 
young man, were singularly eminent 
in his public capacity ; 
he accomplished by a system of conciliation 
what could never be effected by Military coercion ; 
he civilized a savage race of the mountaineers, 
who tor ages had existed in a stute of barbarism, 
and eluded every exertion that had been practised 
against them to suppress their depredations, 
and reduce them to obedience ; 
to his wise and beneficent conduct, 
the English East India Company 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


73 


were indebted for the subjecting to their Government, 
the numerous inhabitants of that wild 
and extensive country, the Jungleterry. 

In his private station, 
by the amiableness of his deportment, 
the gentleness of his manners, 
and the goodness and generosity of his heart, 
he was universally admired, 
beloved and respected by all 
who had the happiness of knowing - him. 

(The principal Natives who had been subject to his 
control solicited permission to give some public testi- 
mony of the sense they entertained of the beneficence 
which he had invariably shewn towards them, by 
erecting also a Monument to his Memory, which was 
accordingly done, and the expences of it were defray- 
ed by voluntary subscription on tliier parts. ) 


Within this Tomb reposeth the body of 
Doctor Rowland Jackson, 

a Member of the Royal College 
of Physicians, of London ; 
who died sincerely lamented 
by his family and friends, 
on the 29th of March 1784, aged 63 Years. 


Near this place, sleep in joyful 
hope of a resurrection, the remains of 
Edward Wheler, Esq., 
third son of Sir William Wheler, Bart, 
of Leamington Hastings, in the county 
of Warwick, 

and of Dame Penelope, his wife ; 
daughter of Sir Stephen Glyn, Bart, 
of Bicester in Oxfordshire, and of 
Dame Sophia, his wife ; 

Daughter of Sir Edward Evelyn 
of Long Dittou in Surry, Bart. 

He married first 
Harriet Chichely Plowden, 
descended from the Plowdens, 
of Plowden in Shropshire ; 
by whom he had no issue. 

Second, Charlotte, daughter of 
George Durnford, Esq. of Winchester, 
by whom he had two daughters : 
Charlotte and Penelope, 
and left them both infants. 

Those who had the happiness of his 
friendship, saw human nature 
in its most amiable form ; 
for he was a kind and tender husband, 
a fond and careful father, 
the warm patron of those he protected 
and the friend of all mankind. 

In his political character, 
which will be best learned from 
the pages of history ; he was an 
upright, just, and honest man ; 
and as his disinterested conduct 
gained the esteem of all ranks of men ; 
so in their memory he is 
honored, beloved, lamented. 

In September his health began to decline, 
and after a few weeks’ illness, 
he died on the 10th of October, 
m the year of our Lord 1784, aged fifty-one. 


Sacred to the remains of 
Edward Stephenson, Esq. 

who died the 13th day ot July 1784, 
in the 45th year of his age. 

As a grateful tribute to his memory, 
This monument is erected by his 
affectionate wife, Sarah Stepheuson. 


Here lies the body of 
Mrs. Martha Goodlad, 

Who departed this life 
21st March 1785, aged twenty-three. 

If ever tears deservedly were shed, 

If ever grief was due to virtue dead, — 

To merit, Martha, and thy spotless ways, 

Claim tears from all, for all allow them praise ; 
Thy strength of mind we scarce shall meet again, 
Shewn through a long, most agonizing pain : 

Thy warm affection as a wife or friend, 

Make all who know you weep your cruel end : 
Cruel, alas ! but this one thing we’re sure, 

Those virtues that you held in life so pure 
Will be repaid ; this thought aud that alone 
Your friends have left to mitigate their moan, 
That latest tribute a kind husband gives, 

Whose heart is torn, is wretched while he lives. 
And only prays one day to reach that shore 
To meet his Martha and to part no more. 


To the Memory of 
James Robert Wadeson, 

A ged 27 years ; 
died the 11th April 1785. 


Sacred 

to the memory of the best of Mothers; 
Elizabeth Crisp, widow ; 

Who alter enduring with heroic constancy 
one of the severest Chirurgical operations, 
died on the 30th of April 1785, 
the patient martyr of a cruel 
and unrelenting malady. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Burrish Crisp, Esquire, 
a Senior Merchant in the service of 
the East India Company ; 
and first member of the Board of Revenue : 
who departed this life on the 
26th day of April 1811, aged 47 years. 

He arrived in this country when a child, 
and was therefore deprived 
of the advantages of an education in Europe, 
but by the tender care of an excellent mother, 
(whose remains are interred near this spot) 
and by the jrowers of his own mind, he attained 
the highest offices under the Government ; 
which he filled with zeal, ability, and honor ; 
whilst his private life was eminently 
distinguished by benevolence, piety 
and every social virtue. 


CHARLES SHORT, ESQ. 

The integrity and uprightness of his conduct, in the transaction of the extensive Mercantile concerns 
in which he had been engaged through the course of a twenty years’ residence in India ; had stamped 
i a general degree of respect on his character at Calcutta, and added to the esteem which all his acquaint- 
ance entertained for him, is the amplest testimony of his loss to society, but that which his more 
intimate friends have sustained by his death, can only he known by those who had frequent opportunities 
of viewing his conduct in domestic and private life, in which situations it was strongly marked by every 
i qualification that could constitute the character of a benevolent man, and an affectionate friend. He 
died at Russapuglah in Calcutta. 

JL 


74 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


The following Inscription is taken from his 
Monument : — 

Here lie the remains of 
Charles Short, Esq. 
who, in the vigour of life, 
and universally regretted, 
exchanged his earthly for an heavenly abode, 
on the 2d day of July 1785. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Eleanor Williamson, 

who died the 28th July 1785, 2El. 45. 

This monument is erected by her 
disconsolate consort, George Williamson. 

A better woman never lived ; a better never died. 


H. Davies, 

aged 4 years, 
died the 4th of Sept. 1785. 

Eleanora Honycomb, 

Ob. 15th of October, A. D. 1785, 
aged 7 months. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me 
and forbid them not.” — Luke 18th v. 16. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Phoebe Jackson, 
late wife of Lieut. Edward Rowland Jackson, 
who died the 20th November 1785, aged 24 years. 
And ye who now with pensive thoughts peruse 
The sad effusions of a mournful muse, 

Yet mark though beauty gives thee every grace. 
And youth’s warm blood still flushes in your face, 
Perhaps o’er you death holds his iron rod, 

And unprepar’d demands thee from thy God. 


The remains of her Father-in-law, 
Doctor Howland Jackson, 

are deposited near tins place. 


Here lieth the body of 
James Arthur, Surgeon, 
who departed this life the 
22d of May 1786, aged 49 years. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Hennes, 

who died the 11th of June 1786, aged 32 years. 


Here lie the remains of 
Mr. William 'Watts, 

Pilot in the Honorable Company’s Service, 
who died the 28th of July 1786, aged 34 years. 
Much regretted by all who knew him. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mackclary, 
the beloved wife of John Mackclary, 
died 8th September, 1786, aged 26. 


In Memory of 
Ensign Duke ’W’elles, 
who died the 11th day of Sept. 1786, 
aged 36 years. 

Much regretted by all who knew him. 


Here lieth interred the body of 
Henry Vansittart, Esq. 
who departed this life the 7th October 1786, 
in the 32d year of his age. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain James Williamson, 

who departed this life on tiie 
2d of December MDCCLXXXVI, aged 44 years 
and of Abraham Roebuck, Esq. 
who died the 12th of May 1788, 
aged XXXIV. years. 


Edmund Bengough, M. D. 

died 10th Jan. 1787, aged 55 years. 


Here lieth the remains of 
Mr. Allan Stewart, 

who died the 5th of February 1787, 
aged 33 years, 

much regretted by all who knew' him. 


In Memory of 

Mr. Jos. Shepperd, Engraver, 
who departed this life the 27th of March 1787, 
aged 34 years. 


Janet Balfour, 

She was born on the 4th November 1783, 
and died on the 11th of April 1787. 


Here lieth the remains of 
Margaret Auchterlony, 
who died of the small-pox on the 
21st of April 1787, in her 14th year. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Joys, 

w ho departed this life the 
first day of May M DCCLXXXV1I. 
aged 28 years 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Gardener, 

who was unfortunately wrecked 
in the Ship Ganges on the 
Barabullor Sand in the lliver Ganges, the 
23rd May 1787, 
in the 47th year of his age. 

T his Monument is erected 
from a motive of filial regard 
by bis affectionate son, Andrew Gardener. 


Here lies interred the remains of 

J. IE. Conyers, 

born May 29th 1751, died May 30th 1787, 
aged 36 years. 

This Monument is erected by his son, J. D. Conyers 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Gibbons, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 
30th day of May, in the year 
of our Lord Christ 1787, aged 40 years. 


In Memory of 
Airs. Rosetta Meridith, 

w’ile of Mr. Thomas Meridith ; 
who departed this life the 1st of October 1787, 
aged 30 years. 


Mr. Duncan Man, 

died 1 0th October 1787, aged 32 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


75 


Erected by Haldane Stuart, 
to the Memory of his brother, 
Buncan Stuart, 
who died the 25th of October 1787, 
aged 17 years and 9 months. 


In Memory of 

Thomas Henry Bourke, Taylor, 
who departed this life 
the 8th of November 1787, aged 39 years. 
He was bprn at Castlebar, 
in the county of Mayo in Ireland, 
on the 19th of Dec. 1748. 


Here lieth the body of 
Mrs. H. Broadbrook, 
who died the 4th January 1788, aged 35 years. 


Mr. William Bonfield, 

died 12th January 1788, aged 41 years. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Smyth, 

who departed this life the 3rd of September 1788, 
in the 33rd year of her age. 


Charlotte Deare, 

died 20th April 1788, aged 3 months 23 days. 


Juxta Cineres Filii Iacobi, 

Maria Keighly, 

Uxor et Delicise Jacobi Inglish Keighly, 
Armiger ; in expectatione Diei Supremae 
Hie Jacet. Qualis erat. 

Ista Dies Indicabit Obiit 11th Nov. 
Anno Dom. 1787, iEtatis sueb 32. 


Sacred to the Memory of the 
Hon. liockhart Gordon, 

youngest son of John, Earl of Aboyne. 
Judge Advocate of Bengal, and Junior 
Counsel of the Hon. East India Company. 
He was born 1732. 

In 1770, he married Catherine, 
daughter to John Wallop, 

Viscount Lymington ; 
by whom he had seven children. 

His mind was great, his knowledge 
and talents eminent, his form beautiful ; 
he joined fortitude to the most 
exquisite sensibility ; and was an affectionate 
husband, a fond father, a zealous friend. 
He died at Calcutta March 24th, 1788, 
sincerely regretted. 


Mr. Joseph Brown, 

died the 28th of April 1788, aged 34 years. 


Here lieth interred the body of 
John Peiarce, Esq. 
who served the Hon. United Company 
with honor and fidelity : 
departed this life on the 20th of May 1788, 
In the 49th year of his age ; 
truly lamented as a sincere friend, 
affectionate brother, and parent 
to the indigent, to whose Memory 
a Monument is erected at Midnapore. 

k 2 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Francis LdHerondell, 

who died 22nd of May 1788, aged 37 years. 


Here lie the remains of 
Mr. James Orrok, 
Assistant Surgeon ; 
who departed this life sincerely 
regretted by all his friends, 
June 25th 1788, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Cornelius Davis, 
died the 9th July 1788, aged 47 years. 


In Memory of 
Phillip Delisle, Esq. 
who died 15th July 1788, aged 46 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Williams, 
wife of Capt. John Williams ; 
died 23d July 1788, aged 43 years. 


To the Memory of 
Charles Crommelin, J unr. Esq. 

Obt. 17th Oct. Anno Domini 1788, /Etat 30. 


To the Memory of 
Miss M. 53. Bristow, 
who died the 17th Dec. 1788, aged 7 months. 


An afflicted and disconsolate father, 
hath caused this Monument to be erected, 
to the Memory of his only son, 
'W'arren Hastings Larkins ; 
who died the 20th August, 1788, 
aged 4 years and 20 days. 

An uncommon promising genius, and 
engaging and amiable disposition, made 
him the delight of his father and a favourite 
of the settlement ; in this season of innocence, 
the hand of providence visited him with 
a mortal disease, and removed him from the 
presence of his earthly parent, to the 
kingdom of his heavenly father and 
Redeemer. The dictates of reason and 
religion may teach us to acknowledge the 
benefits derived to him from the change ; 

but the lenient hand of time only can 
reconcile the feelings of paternal affection, 
to the disappointments of hope, on which 
it had fondly rested, and which have 
been thus untimely destroyed. 


The body of 
Montagu Perreau, 

Son of R. S. and M. Perreau ; 
born 25th Nov. 1787, died 25th Nov. 1788. 


To the Memory of 
Mr. Samuel Oldham, 
who died the 30th of Nov. 1788, 
aged 55 years. 


Js. Stormouth, 

died the 19th Dec. 1788, aged four years. 


7G 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Post varios Casus, varies post, Belli Labores 
Hie procul a Patna Indi propter Ripas 
Edmondsoni Leyionis Prafecti 
Ossa quiescunt 

Quern Rohillorum Pnedatorae Manus 
Impia quern Agmina Hyderi, 
quern Indiae fasti Invictum Testantur 
Indomitums Moro Sola Negat 
Bellicae Virtutis praemiis 
Gladio honorifice donaturn voluit. Anglia grata. 
* Atoribus ornate Castris Sodalitio Cornis 
Hospitio largus Munificus 
Denique bonus, omnibus Carus 
Vixit ad ^Etat. 44 Ann. 

Flebilis Obiit Jan. 31 A. D. 1789. 

O Quicunque Audes Moliri grandia, disce 
Edmondsoni instar Yivere, disce nrori. 


Here resteth the remains of 

Charlotte Lottie, 

The daughter of the Rev. John Loftie, A. M. 
Rector of Saint Dunstan’s, Canterbury ; 
and one of the Chaplains of the 
Bengal Establishment. 

Obiit 1st of February 1789, aged 18 years. 
Also of his eldest daughter, 

Mary Garstin, 

who w r as for near twenty-two years 
the highly esteemed and well beloved wife of 
Major General John Garstin, 

Engineer and Surveyor General ; 
she departed this life after a long and 
painful illness which she bore 
with fortitude and resignation, 
on the 28th of July 1811, 
and only grieved her husband when she died. 
Aged 42 years, 

leaving issue seven children to lament their loss. 
These sisters were lovely and pleasant 
in their lives, and in their death they 
were not divided. 


Alexander 

Son of John and Elizabeth Mackenzie, 
born 3d January 1788, died 13th April 1789. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. William Williams, 

who departed this life 
the 18th of April 1789, aged 39 years. 

Mr. C. Myers, 

died 4th June 1789, aged 43 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Deane Pearse, Esq. 
late Colonel in the service of the 
Hon. East India Company. 

He was an officer in the Royal Artillery ; in 1757 
was present at the sieges of Guadaloupe, 
the Havannah, and Bellisle. 

In 1768, he came to India with the rank 
of Major in the Artillery, and in 1769 
succeeded to the command of that Corps, 
which he retained till his death. 

He marched a detachment to join the 
army under Sir Eyre Coote, in the 
Carnatic ; and served there during the 
war, and returned to Bengal in 1785, 
and for the last three years of his life 
he was senior Officer of the Bengal army. 

In his public capacity, he distinguished 

* Probubly meant lor Moribus ornate Castus. 


himself by his abilities and unwearied 
attention to the duties of his station, 
and to the general interests of those 
he commanded. As an individual he was 
respected for the benevolence of his disposition, 
and for the warmth of his friendship. 

He died on the 15th of June 1789, aged 47 years. 


In Memory of 
Miss Anne Matthews, 

who died 30th of July MDCCLXXXIX. 
aged 2 years 6 tnonths. 


William Fenny, 

died 7th September 1789, aged 17 years. 


Mr. S Newton, Free Mariner, 
died 16th September 1789, aged 31. 


Mrs. M. T. C. Cockerell, 

(The lady of Charles Cockerell, and daughter 
of Sir Charles William Blunt, Bart.) After a 
long and painful illness borne with the most 
exemplary resignation, Mrs. Cockerell quitted a 
life, brief indeed in duration, but unceasingly 
employed in the benevolent exercise of every vir- 
tuous endowment. On the following morning, a 
numerous company attended her remains to the 
burying ground to witness the solemnity of the 
interment and pay the mournful tribute to depart- 
ed virtue. 

The following Inscription is taken from her 
Monument : — 

Maria Tryphena Caroli Cockerell, 

Uxor Ob. Octobers, Anno. Dom. 1789. 


Beneath this stone are deposited the remains of 
Captain John 'White, 
late Commander of the Hon. Company’s 
ship “ Earl of Oxford,” 
in which service he was 35 years ; 
he departed this life 10th October 1789, 
in the 47 th year of his age ; — 
after a long and tedious illness 
which he bore with Christian fortitude. 

He lived respected and esteemed by all 
who knew him, and died universally 
lamented by his friends. 


Mr. J 03. Harman, 

died 12th Oct. 1789, aged 29 years. 


Miss Mary Hitherington, 

who died 22nd Oct. 1789, aged 16 years. 


In Memory of 
■William Coke Astley, 

Son of Sir Edward Astley, Bart, 
who died the 4th of Nov. 1789, aged 21 years, 
And lies here interred. 


Here lies a worthy family : 

Mrs. Mary Boyle, 
her father and mother, 

Mr Bichard Bean, 

Deputy Master Attendant of Calcutta, died in 1773. 
Mrs. Dean, died 20th July 1788, 
much regretted by all who knew her. 

Mrs. Boyle died 27th November 1789, aged 32. 
A better woman or more loving wife never lived. 
This Monument is erected, 
as sacred to her Memory ; 
by her husband, Mr. Wm. Boyle. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of 
Lieut. David Dyce, 

who departed this life 
on the 26th of February MDCCXC. 
aged 23 years. 


In grateful remembrance of 
Mrs. Ann Jones, 

The lady of W. T. Jones, Attorney at Law ; 
who died the 3rd of January 1790, aged 29. 
Tho’ low in earth your virtuous form decayed, 
My faithful wife, my loved Nancy ’s laid. 

In Chastity you kept a husband’s heart, 

To all but him, as cold as now thou art. 

To name your virtues, ill befits his grief, 

What was his bliss, can now give no relief. 

Your husband mourns, the rest let friendship tell : 
Fame spread your worth, — your husband knew it 
well. 


In Memory of 
Capt. Thomas Gladwin, 
who departed this life on the 28th of 
February 1790, aged 38 years. 

And also to the memory of his infant nephew, 
Thomas Gladwin, 

who died 28th of August 1780, aged 3 years. 


In Memory of 
Air. George Lewis, 

late Assistant Surgeon on this Establishment ; 
who departed this life the 
17th of March A1DCCXC. aged 39 years. 


Air. Herbert William Ord, 

died the 9th of January 1796, aged 34 years. 
Aliss Martha Jane Ord, 
died 9th January 1796, aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

John, 

son of John and Mary Lynham, 
died 30th of May 1790, aged 5 months. 


Alaster Stephen Matthews, 

died the 24th of December MDCCXC. 
aged 18 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lucy Gardener, 
wife of Conductor Daniel Gardener, 
who departed this life the 28th July 1790, 
aged 38 years. 


Here rest the remains of 
Airs. Catherine Deare, 
who died at Calcutta the 6th of Sept. 1790, 
aged XXXIV. years. 

In Memory of her and of her husband, 
Lieut. -Col. Charles Russel Deare, 
who fell by a cannon shot, 
on the 13th of the same month ; 
while commanding the Bengal Artillery, 
in the action fought between a 
detachment of the British forces 
and those of Tippo Sultan, 
near Sattimungulum. 
aged XL. years. 


>* 

/ / 

This Monument was erected by their brother, 
Col. George Deare, 

(The remains of Col. Deare were interred not 
far from the ground whereon he fell , and they 
were alike unconscious of each other 1 s fate. A 
tree grows near his grave, on the hark of tv hie h, 
his soldiers, as the only testimonial of respect and 
affection that the time and circumstances of war 
allowed them, engraved his name.) 


To the Memory of 

Thomas Payne, Esq. 

First Lieut, of His Alajesty’s Ship “ Phoenix,” 
who died the 13th of September 1790, 
aged 25 years. 

In gratitude to whose memory, and as a 
small testimony of their unalterable affection, 
this Monument is erected by desire of his 
faithful shipmates, who sincerely lament 
the loss of their departed friend. 


Mr. Thomas Fowler Turner, 

late chief Officer of the “ Rodney” East Indiaman, 
died the 5th September 1 790, aged XXV. years. 
Truly lamented by all who knew him. 


Here lyeth the body of 
John Butler Langley, 

who departed this life the 1st of October 1790, 
aged 30 years. 


Here, lie the bodies of 

Louisa Ann Macan, 

who died the 28th October 1790, aged seven days. 

Thomas Macan, 

who died the llt,h of September 1792, 
aged nine days. 

And Lousia Macan, 
who died the 3d of January 1794, 
aged two months and eleven days. 

The infant children of 
Turner, and F. L. A. Macan, of Calcutta. 


In Memory of 

Thomas Legh, Esq. 

who departed this life the 17th of Nov. 1790, 
aged 44 years. 


Also to the Memory of 
Anna Helena Legh, 
who was killed by lightning 
the 27th of May 1788, aged 11 years, 

Charles Purling, Esq. 
late senior Merchant in the service of 
the Honorable E. India Company, 
Obt. January 31, 1791, JEt. 44. 


Air. John Swift, Mariner, 
departed this life 26th April 1791, JEt. 70 years. 
An old inhabitant of Calcutta, and near 
50 years a resident in India. 

Happy is he, the only happy man, 

Who out of choice does all the good he can ; 

Who business loves, and others better makes, 

By prudent industry, and care he takes. 

God’s blessing here he’ll have, and man’s esteem 
And when he dies, his works will follow him. 


Air. Francis Le Gallais, 

died 22d August 1791, aged 54 years. 


78 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of 
William Wordsworth, Esq. 
late senior Merchant in the service of 
the Honorable East India Company, 
who died on the 22nd of August MDCCXCI. 
aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Smith, Esq. 
who departed this life 
on the 30th of August MDCCXCI. 


In Memory of 
Francis Rundall, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 
2d of Sept. 1791, aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Maria Law, 

who departed this life on the 3 1st of May 1792, 
Aged XXVI. years and five months. 

To the Memory of her infant son, 
born 24th March 1792, 
and died the 10th of April following. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. James Wilkinson, of Artillery. 
Obitt 16th June 1792, yEtatis suae 33. 


Life how short ; 

In Memory of Henry Jover, 
son of Wm. and Eliza Jover, 
died July the 19th 1792, aged 4 months 8 days. 


To the Memory of 

Robert Newton, 

who departed this life September 5th, 1791, 
aged 35 years. 

By nature form’d for every social part, 

Mild were his manners and sincere his heart. 
This Monument, the tribute of affection, 
was erected by a friend. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Anne Champion, 

who died on the 22nd of October MDCCXCI. 
aged 28 years. 


In Memory of 
Mr. Peter Berry, 

who departed this life the 
14th November 1791, aged 26 years. 


In Memory of 

Wm. Mange on, 

who departed this life 15tli Nov. 1791, ^Et. 57. 


This Monument 
is erected to the Memory of 
Mr. John 'Williams, 
who departed this life 
November the 30th, 1791, aged 21 years ; 
and of his infant niece, 
Elizabeth Horsley, 
who departed this life March the 3d, 1799, 
aged 18 months and 20 days. 


In Memory of 
Mr. Garret Pearse, 

Deputy Commissary of Stores, 
who departed this life 28th Jan. 1792. 

Also Mrs. Mary Pearse, his wife, 
deceased the 28th May 1795, aged 46 years. 

Both esteemed in their lives, and 
their death lamented by those who knew them. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
The R ev. John Christman Diemer, L. L, D. 
who died the 21st of February 1792, 
aged XLIV. years. 


Master James 'Wintle, 

died the 4th of March 1792. 


Mr. James Gilbert, 

departed this life 16th May 1792, aged 41 years. 
Domus Orationis Gloria Miserere Confiteor. 


Mrs. Mary Deare. 

died 19th of May MDCCX1L aged 30 years. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Susanna Hunter, 
wife of Mr. Richard Robt. Hunter, 
who departed this life on the 7th of October, 
MDCCXCII. aged XXIX. years. 

Also of two of her children, who died infants. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut John J. Briscoe, 

of the Bengal Artillery, 
who departed this life November 2d, 1792, 
Aged XXVII. years. 


In Memory of 
Mr. J. C. Otterson, 

who died the 28th Nov. MDCCXCII. 
Aged 34 years. 

The remains of 
James Cosmo Gordon, 

Nat. Aug. 13, 1756. Nup. Oct. 16, 1792, 
Obt. Dec. 31, 1792. 

This stone is erected by his 
dutiful andafflicted widow, Christiana Gordon. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Jacob Sarley, 

Citizen of New York, America, 
who died Jan. the 1st A. D. 1793, aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Joys, 
who departed this life the 
fifth of January MDCCXCIII. aged 29 years. 

Anna Dorothea Wuldem, 

died at Calcutta on the 8th of March 1793, 
aged 29 years, 8 months, 20 days. 

In Memory of 

IX enry Patrick 'W'ilsone, F.sq. 
who departed this life on the 11th of May 1793, 
aged 42 years. 

Few men have quitted the stage of life 
whose loss will be more sincerely regretted, 
by a circle of friends, 
as respectable as they were numerous. 

“ In manners gentle, and in temper mild ; 

In wit, a man, simplicity a child.” 

Here lieth interred the body of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Bruce, 
who departed this life 
on the 8th of June MDCCXCIII. 
aged 17 years, 1 month and 15 days. 

She left a husband and two infant sons to 
bewail their loss, the one aged 1 year and 9 
months, the other 4 days. 














I ill 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


In Memory of the late 
Mr. 'William Williams, 
who died much respected by all who knew him, 
on the 15th of July MDCCXCIII. aged 39 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Lowis, 

who departed this life on the 
6th of August 1793, aged XXIX. years. 


In Memory of 
Mrs. Mary lVIowet, 

wife of Mr. James Mowet, mate 
in the II. C. P. Service, 

Obt. 29 August 93, Hit. 17. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Miss Margaret Charlotte Jackson, 

who arrived in Calcutta 

on the 10th day of September in the year 1793, 
and whom it pleased Almighty God to release 
from a long, lingering and painful illness, 
on the 19th of the same month ; 
at the age of 16 years and 9 months. 

This Monument is erected 
by her affectionate and afflicted father. 
Sleep soft in dust, await the Almighty’s will, 
Then rise unchang’d and be an Angel still. 


S. R. J. C. H. I. 

M. C. Birch, 

Nat. 22, Marie 1790, Obt. 10 Oct. 1793. 


l-Iere lie interred the bodies of 
Robert Udny, and of Ann, his wife, 
who, on the 3d of January 1794, 
were overset in a boat, as they were crossing the 
river opposite to Calcutta, and perished. 

He aged 31, she aged 26 years. 

“ They were lovely and pleasant in their lives, and 
in their death they werenot divided.” 2 Sami. 1,23. 
“ Prisoners of hope.” — Zach. 9, 12. 


To the Memory of 
Catherine, the beloved 
Wife of Mr. J. Bowers. 

Obitt. March 27th, 1794, aged 28 years. 
The beloved mother ot nine children ; 
leaving a disconsolate husband and 
seven children ever to regret their loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Anna Maria Palling, 
w r ho departed this life on the 
25th of April MDCCXCIV. aged 19 years. 
Few were her days, yet in fulfilling the relative 
duties of a daughter, wife, and mother, she gave 
ample indication how valuable her life would 
have been, had it pleased Heaven to have 
continued it. She lived 

Happy in the love and esteem of all who knew 
her virtue, And died 

When every hope ripening to reward them. 


SIR WILLIAM JONES, KNT. — (One of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Judicature in Bengal.) 

“ Both age and youth, promiscuous crowd the J omb ; 

No mortal head can shun th ’ impending doom.” — H orat. 

“ Sir William Jones was born in A. U. 1746 at his father’s residence in Wales ; he was son to the 
celebrated mathematician, William Jones, who was both the disciple and friend of Newton, under whose 
| oatronage he taught mathematics in London, and had the honor of instructing the late Earl of Hard- 
vicke in that science. 

“ In 1782, Sir William Jones made the tour of France, after which he resided for a few months in 
3 aris, where he was introduced at Court. The French Monarch was much pleased with his conversa- 
ion and made many inquires respecting some of the provinces he had travelled through, to all of which 
• le answered him in the particular dialect of each province. After Sir William withdrew, the king turned 
ibout to one of his courtiers, saying, ‘ he is a most extraordinary man ! He understands the language 
)f my people better than I do myself!’ * Yes, please your Majesty,’ replied the courtier, ‘ he is, 
ndeed a more extraordinary man than you are aware of, for he understands almost every language in 
-.he world, but his own.’ ‘ Mon dieu !’ exclaimed the King, ‘ then of what country is he ?’ ‘ He is, 
i3 lease your Majesty, a Welshman !’ 

“ In April 1783, Sir William Jones married Miss Shipley, daughter of the late Bishop of St. Asaph, 
ind sister to the Reverend W. D. Shipley, Dean of that Diocese. 

“ In the same year Sir William Jones had been appointed one of the Judges of the Supreme Court 
af Judicature in Bengal, and had embarked on board the * Crocodile’ frigate. 

“ Sir William Jones arrived at Calcutta about the beginning of October ; and, after having taken his 
seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, according to the usual forms, he lost no time in making 
(public his plan for instituting a Society at Calcutta, for the purpose of inquiring into the history, arts, 
(sciences and literature of Asia. The plan was embraced with eagerness by those gentleman in Calcutta 
who were best qualified to estimate its advantages, and to contribute to its support ; and being 
patronized by Mr. Hastings, then Governor General, with that liberality with which he was wont to 
oster every literary undertaking, the Society was soon found. The President’s chair was first offered 
o Mr. Hastings, but on his declining it, Sir William Jones was elected perpetual President; and he 
delivered his preliminary discourse in February 1784. 

“He was now enabled to give full scope to the excursions of his mind, and to gratify every wish of 
lis heart. The wide and fruitful region of Asiatic learning was open before him, and the high and 
independent situation which he filled, gave him a commanding prospect of it ; whilst he practised those 
aws which it was the pride of his life to cherish and revere, and administered to his fellow-creatures 
he pure maxims of justice and truth. 

“He had long ardently desired to study the Sanscrit language; and this desire was considerably 
ncreased by the great progress which he found Mr. Wilkins had made in that ancient idiom, and still 
nore by that gentleman’s elegant translation of the Bhagavat Geeta. He therefore commenced his 
studies in the Sanscrit without delay, and in the course of three years made himself so completely 
master of it, that the most enlightened professors of the doctrines of Brahma ‘ confessed,’ says Lord 


80 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Teignmouth, in his discourse on the death of his friend, * with pride, delight, and surprise that his 
knowledge of their sacred dialect was most critically correct and profound. And the Pandits who 
were in the habit of attending him, when I saw them after his death, at a public durbar, could neither 
suppress their tears for his loss, nor iind words to express their admiration at the wonderful progress 
which he had made in their sciences.” 

“ The pertinacious and unwearied diligence with which he applied to his studies, deserves to be 
recorded. He made a regular distribution and allotment of his time. He rose at daybreak, and 
studied till breakfast time ; after which, during terms, he attended his duty in the Supreme Court, 
from whence he returned home at three o’clock, and studied till four ; he then went to dinner, where 
he generally had a select party of friends assembled, whom he entertained with the utmost gaiety till 
seven ; when he returned to his literary labours, and did not again quit them till midnight ; this was 
his constant habit, from which he seldom or never deviated. No man enjoyed more than he did the 
delights of friendly intercourse, and the festive pleasures of society ; but all his pleasures were subservient 
to the paramount gratification he derived from the successful pursuit of the great end he had in view, 
that of serving his country, and instructing mankind ; for what Johnson says of Pope, may with 
strict truth be applied to him, ‘ that he was one of those few whose labour is their pleasure.’ 

“ The most useful work in which he was ever engaged, and upon which, therefore, he was the most 
intent, de did not live to complete ; this was a copious digest of Hindu and Mahommedan law, compiled 
from Sanscrit and Arabic originals, a plan of which he had presented to Government, who had given 
it their most liberal patronage and strenuous support. The Pandits employed in the undertaking had 
concluded their part of it, and the Moluvees had nearly finished the portion which it was their business 
to supply, when the hand of death arrested the progress of the work and deprived society of a Jones. 

“ That the good and evil, the felicities and misfortunes ofhuman life are alike precarious, is a great 
and established truth, known and felt by the most untutored people. Every one knows that our lives, 
being at the Divine disposal, are not for a moment sure. The hand of death hangs over us in the joyous 
hours of hilarity ; threatens the tranquil pleasures of connubial happiness, and meets us with its pointed 
dart amidst the dignity of religious and philosophic retirement. Death shoots his stings from every 
side and is terrible to all. The rose of youth, and the grey hairs of age ; the blushing smiles of beauty, 
and the paleness of declining elegance ; the glittering magnificence of royalty, and the humble roof of 
rural quietness ; the rudeness of unlettered barbarism and the polish of instructed genius ; must all 
yield to the inevitable blow. 

“ When the social comforts of life thus dropt away, let us not, like Zeno, coldly refuse to pay our 
tribute to departed worth, but with all the warmth of Tibullus, speak the language of our hearts. 

“ We have been led into these reflections by the death of that celebrated and illustrious man who 
has opened the long hidden mines of Oriental literature and displayed them to the European world 
with all the brilliancy of British eloquence, and who with all the amiable and endearing qualities of the 
heart, disdaining the lesser amusements of life, devoted his time to the service of his country, of science 
and of virtue. 

“ Possessing in all the habitudes of life a perennial spring of cheerfulness, and a conciliating | 
gentleness of manners ; warmed by the simple greatness of moral affection, is there a heart so callous as ! 
not to feel his loss ? Is there a husband who knows the tenderness of love and the purity of domestic 1 1 
felicities ; is there a friend who glows with sincerity ; or is there a man who respects the divine attributes i 
of virtue, who does not deplore it with the deepest regret ? Their breasts beat with unison of sorrow | 1 
and with the calm manliness of silent grief, pay their heartfelt tribute of affection to the memory of 
the brother of human kindness. 

“ Virtues so transcendant, a heart so perfect and a mind so sound, form indeed a combination of s 1 
private excellencies rare and admirable. 

“ Religion, the source of every moral goodness, found in him a constant supporter and an obedient! : 
child ; moderate and magnanimous, he was orthodox without bigotry and zealous without ostentation, : u 
with all the mildness of Christianity he enjoyed its benefits and participated its enjoyments. 

“ Such endearing benignity, seldom equalled, and not to be surpassed, added a lustre to the splendour; 1 
of his public character, unparalleled even in the annals of literary record. 

“ We contemplate both the private and public endowments of Sir William Jones with a correspondent n 
and peculiar satisfaction. At home he was always good, and abroad he was always great. As a great; 1 
man, whether we consider the perspicuity of his genius, the variety of his powers, or the extent of his , 
erudition, we are alike enamoured and astonished. 

“ Of his mental qualifications, at once so splendid and extraordinary, let us indulge in the enumera-j n 
tion. That promptitude of perception which sees through systems at a glance ; that brightness oil 9 
understanding which no paradoxical theorems can cloud ; that solidity of judgment which scepticism! fi 
dares not approach, and above all that retention of memory which carries worlds on its wings, were) ,1 
possessed by him in all the amplitude of perfection. With such properties, a lively fancy corrected bv art 1 
exquisite taste, formed his mind, while he was yet a boy, to the charms of poetry, which in his mature! 
years, ripened into eminence as a poetical critic. But his infant attachment and partiality to the velve' 
paths of muses, did not prevent him from penetrating with persevering assiduousness the thorn) 
avenues of science. As a lawyer he distinguished himself at an early age : and he not only attained 
superior knowledge in the laws of his own country, but in those also of every other of the civilise! 
globe. Without having travelled much, but with a perfect knowledge of the ancient tongues, he no 
only mastered all the polished languages of Europe, but also those of Asia. The Sanskrit, a languagi 
of which, till Mr. Wilkin’s publication, little was known but the name, and the celebrity of those win 
speak it, he attempted, unassited by a Grammar, and conquered by that unwearied diligence to whicl 
all other studies yielded. His numerous and elegant translations, and particularly his last very greaj 
and curious production, posterity will only need to know never to cease admiring. The presen 
generation already knows sufficient to render the comments of an humble essayist useless and unavailing 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


81 


The name of Sir William Jones stands alone a monument of greatness ; it commands the attention of 
surrounding nations, and extorts the praises of malignant criticism. It demands the gratitude of the 
ignorant, the commemoration of the learned, and the prayers of the pious. 

“ Such were the virtues, such the acquirements of this mighty genius, who has at once illuminated 
the eastern and western hemispheres ; whose name resounds through both with the fondest exclamations 
of regard, and whose death was mourned from the throne to the cottage. 

“ To attempt an illustration of Sir William Jones’ character by contrasting his powers with those of 
other great men, is obviously unnecessary ; for where can a man be found either in ancient or modern 
history of equal knowledge ; others have gone through the beaten tracks of science, and some have 
made roads of their own, but where can we find a man besides who has at once done both, and dug- 
through the almost inaccessible precipices of Asiatic learning ! With him the world was blessed : with 
him his country was honored ; with him literature was graced, but the sacred arm of Omnipotence hath 
snatched him from us to a happier and more exalted place where he will receive the rewards of virtue.” 

“As an excellent poet to whose translations we are indebted for many beautiful effusions of the Per- 
sian muse, was endowed by nature with a mind of extraordinary vigour. Sir William, by unwearied 
industry, aided by superior genius, successfully explored the hidden sources of Oriental science and 
(literature, and his attainments in this interesting branch of learning were such as to place him far be- 
.yond all competition the most eminent Oriental scholar in this or perhaps any other age. 

“ In his public character, the labour he afforded in the despatch of business, the clearness of his 
discernment and his legal abilities, well qualified him for one of the guardians of the laws and the rights 
of his fellow-citizens. As a scholar his name is known wherever literature is cultivated. In private 
life he was companiable, mild, gentle, and amiable in his manners, and his conversation rich and ener- 
getic. In fine, in all the relations of public and private life he was revered and beloved. 

“ Unlike many other eminent literary characters of the age, Sir William was a sincere and pious 
Christian ; instead of labouring by his writings to propagate the doctrines of infidelity, as has been a 
favourite practice with some modern philosophers of reputation, he was desirous to lend the Scriptures 
his utmost support, and in one of his latest annual discourses to the Asiatic Society he has done more 
to give validity to the Mosaic History of the creation than the researches of any contemporary writers. 

“ In April 1794, he was attacked with a bilious complaint, which after a few weeks proved so obstinate 
that it baffled the utmost skill of his physicians, and on Sunday morning the 27th of the same month, 
ne died, agreeably to the uniform tenor of his life, a Patriot, a Philosopher, and a Christian.” 

He was buried the day following with all the respect belonging to his rank, and what is more valua- 
ole, with all the honors due to his virtues. A bust of Sir William Jones in marble can be seen at the 
Asiatic Society’s rooms. 

The following Inscription is taken from an Obelisk erected over his remains and is one of the loftiest 
n the Ground : — 


Sir William Jones, Knt. 
died the 27 th April 1794, 
aged 47 years and 7 months. 


(The above is on the north face of the Monu- 
ment : on the eastern face is the following , writ- 
ten by himself. ) 

Here was deposited the mortal part of a man, 
who feared God, but not death, 
and maintained independence, 
but sought not riches ; who thought 
none below him but the base and unjust ; 
none above him but the wise and virtuous : 
who loved 

his parents, kindred, friends, and country, 
with an ardour 

which was the chief source of 
all his pleasures and all his pains : 
and who having devoted 
his life to their service, and to 
■he improvement of his mind, resigned it calmly, 
giving glory to his Creator, 
wishing peace on earth, 
and with good will to all creatures. 

On the twenty-seventh day of April, 

In the year of our blessed Redeemer, 

One thousand seven hundred and ninety four. 


Here lies the body of 

Mr. John Gregory, 

Late 3rd Officer of the Ship “ Boddington ” 
who died the 5th of May, MDCCXCIV.' 
Aged 20 years. 

M 


D. O. M. 

Beneath this Monument are deposited the remains 
of ‘’William Gumming-, 
of the Honorable East India Company’s Service, 
who departed this life on the 1 1th day of October, 
A. D. 1794. 

To mark the spot of his interment, this 
Monument was erected and this Marble inscribed 
by his Nephew, George Cumming. 


In the Memory of 
Mr. George Ijeeberg, 
who died the 27th October MDCCXCIV. 
Aged 32 years. 


In Memory of 

Petronella Adriana Andrews, 

Born the 28th of March 1753, 

Departed this life the Ilth of November 1794, 
Aged 40 years, 7 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 

Anne Xiedlie, 

the wife of William Ledlie, who died at Calcutta 
the 25th day of December 1794, 

Aged 26 years. Also of 
Thomas and Anna iiliza Iiedlie. 
her son and daughter, who both died infants. 


Sacred, to the Memory of 
Francis Smyth, Junr. Esq. 
late Sub-Accountant General, 
who died on the 3rd of April 1795, 
Aged 27 years. 

To tell his virtues and useful 
attainments here would be a vain task. 


82 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. William Howard, 

who departed this life on the 
18th of August 1795, aged 46 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Wm. Counsell, 

who died the 24th of September 1795, 
aged 42 years, 4 months and 15 days, 
much regretted by all who knew him. 
Erected by his dutiful daughter, Maria Perry. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Juliana Crommelin, 

wife of C. R. Crommelin, 
who died 2nd November 1795, aged 25. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
a dutiful son and affectionate brother, 
Richard Peirce, Esq. 

Eldest son of Captain Pierce, of the 
“ Halsewell,” East Indiaman. 

His many amiable qualities endeared him 
to society, and his friends will long- 
lament his early death. 

Obt. Nov. 19, Anno Dom. 1795, 
Etatis 27 years. 


To the Memory of 
Captain 'William Haig-, 

of the “ Woodcote” Indiaman, 
who died the 27th day of November 1795, 
Aged 30 years. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Ann Mead, 

who died the 4th Dec. 1795, aged 25 years. 


To the Memory of 
Miss Elizabeth Johnson, 

Grand-daughter of Mr. Charles Weston, 
who died 6th December 1795, 
Aged 13 years 1 month. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Moscrop, 
wife of William Moscrop, 
who died the 12th of January 1796, 
Aged XXII. years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Brisco, 

Eldest daughter of 
Major Genei'al Horton Brisco, 
Obt. 16th May 1796, Etat 24. 
Hin cilia; lacrymse. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. T. Leek, 
who departed this life on the 
2nd of August 1796, aged 24 years. 
This Monument erected by his disconsolate 
widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
The Hon. John Hyde, Esq. 
who was appointed one of the Puisne Judges, 
on the establishment of the Supreme Court 
at Calcutta, in the year 1774 ; 

And died, after faithfully and ably discharging 
the duties of that high station 
for a period of above twenty-one years, aged 59, 
On the 8th of July, 1796. 


He was an affectionate husband ; a fond parent ; 
Of unquestioned integrity as a Judge, 

And a truly virtuous man. 

His loss was deeply and honorably regretted 
by that community which had 
long respected his virtues ; And the 
public records of his Government 
declare him to have been A Magistrate 
Whose integrity in the discharge of his 
public functions, 

Was only equalled by the virtues 
of his private character, 

Social, yet dignified, he commanded at once 
the affections and reverence 
of the wide-extended circle, honored 
by a participation of his hospitalities ; 
but his noblest eulogium will be found 
in the lasting regrets of a long list 
of unfortunate persons ; 
whose indigent condition, 

By his advice, protection, and munificence ; 
his life was one continued study to meliorate, 
And must whoever regard him 
As a departed model of unexampled, 

Yet cautiously concealed charity ; 

The practical extent of which 
could alone be exceeded 
By the boundless benevolence 
and generosity of his mind . 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Willim Jones, 

who departed this life 
the 1st of Sept. 1796, aged 45 years. 


Miss Prances Matilda Robinson, 

Bom 25th Sept. 1796, died 1st Nov. 1796, 
Aged 1 month and 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. A. Murray, 

of the Bengal Establishment, 
who died 7th Dec. 1796, aged 36 years. 


Master George Best Robinson, 

born 3d Jan. 1795, died 9th Dec. 1796, 
Aged 23 months and 6 days. 

In Memory of one whom 
Gentleness, Benevolence, and Piety, 
endeared to private affection, and public esteem, 
Henrietta, 

Wife of Charles Rothman, Esq. 

Born at Caermarthen, the 21st of Sept. 1770, 
deceased at Calcutta the 25th of Dec. 1796. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that 
He shall stand at the latter day upon the 
earth.” — Job, xix. 25. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Anne Jones, 

Wife of Samuel Jones, 
who departed this life on the 
4th day of April 1797, aged 26 years. 

Also to Christ. Robert and Hannah, 
Her son and daughter, who both died Infants. 


John Campbell Henderson, 

Obt. 21st Oct. 1797, Et. 28 years. 


Mrs. Hesilrige.* 

* The name onlv is on the stone ; she died on tlw 
29th July, 1797. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


83 


Here lies enterred the body of 
Mr. Thomas Syars Driver, Architect, 
who departed this life on the 6th day of 
Dec. 1797, aged 35 years 7 months and 25 days. 
This Monument is erected to his memory 
by his widow, Maria Driver. 


This stone was erected 
by the desire of the affectionate widow' of 
Capt. James Thompson, 
late of Poplar near London, 
who died at Calcutta December 21, 1797, 
Aged 38 years. 

She rests in hope of meeting once again 
Her better half, never to sunder more ; 

Nor does she hope in vain ; the time draws on 
Where not a single spot of burial earth, 
Whether in land or in the spacious sea, 

But must give back its long committed dust 
inviolate. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Thomson, 

daughter of Mr. Alex. Sannell, 
who departed this life on the 
23d of January 1798, aged 20 years. 

Filia obsequens, Uxor Amens, et Mater Beniyne. 


To the Memory of 
Charles, the infant son of 
Bryant and Elizabeth Mason. 

Obt. 20th Jan. A. D. 1798, Ait. 1 M. 7 D. 


To the Memory of 
Charles Ghristian Kioer, Esq. 
who departed this life the 22d of April 1798, 
Aged 41 years and 23 days. 

He was born at Lyngbyein Denmark, on the 
29th day of April 1757. 


Catherine Hariot Greene, 

daughter of Capt. Anthony Greene, 
died 28th of April 1798, 
Aged one year and eight months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Prudence Maxwell, 

who died the 9th of May 1798, aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Serjeant Major Peter Kearney, 
who departed this life the 4th of May 1798, 
Aged 36 years. 

This Monument was erected by his 
disconsolate widow', in testimony of her affection. 


Underneath lie the remains 
of Capt. Anthony Hunt, 

late Commander of his Britannic Majesty's ship 
“ La Virginie,” 

and Post Captain in the Royal Navy ; 
who departed this life on the 10th clay of 
August 1798, 

after a short illness, in the 28th year of his age, 
and who at that early age had acquired 
great honour in his profession, and the esteem 
and regard of all who had the honour of his 
acquaintance. 

By his death the Navy has lost 
one of its brightest ornaments, 
and society one of its most valuable members, 
for he lived greatly beloved and respected, 
and died universally regretted, 
m 2 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sackville Marcus Taylor, 

who departed this life the 
14th of September 1798, aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the. Memory of 
Anna Maria, 
the Honourable Mrs. Bruce, 
daughter of Sir Charles W. Blunt, Baronet. 
Married in 1795 the honourable Charles 
A. Bruce, brother of Thomas, Earl of 
Eglin and Kincardine, who died at Hoogly 
after one day’s illness 

on the 19th of September 1798, aged 23 years. 
By a natural benevolence of mind 
and an unaffected and becoming dignity of 
manner, by a propriety of conduct, 
and examplary deportment upon all occasions, 
by glowing affections, as 
a daughter, a sister, a friend, and a wdfe, 
by a singular humanity 
and sincere sympathy with the distressed ; 
accomplished, graceful, and elegant, 

She attracted love and esteem 
so far as her character reached. 

Let an unexpected fall in the vigour of life, 
a sudden extinction of so much accumulated 
virtue, the unfeigned tears of affection, 
the mournful solemnity of death, 
and the deep silence of the grave, 
Impress our minds with the fear of God, 
and his awful dispensations. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Dorothy Smith, 

who departed this life on 
the 1st of October 1798, aged 28 years. 
In all things sincere. 


The mortal part of 
Samuel Fairfax, Esq. 

Son of Sir William George Fairfax, 
is deposited here ; 

Born A. D. 1776, be died the 19th of Nov. 1793, 
deservedly regretted by all his friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jean Tulloh, 
wife of William Tulloh. 

She died the 27th May 1799, 
aged 53 years and 6 months. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that hs 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth.” 


Anne JUidia Robertson, 

daughter of Colin and Elizabeth Robertson ; 
she died the 18th of Feb. 1800, 

Aged 2 years 6 months and 20 days. 

Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 
them not, for such is the kingdom of God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Catharine Isodge, 

Eldest daughter of William Tulloh. 

She died the 24th July 1797, 
aged 23 years and 4 months. 

“ And Jesus answered and said unto her, Martha 
Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many 
things ; but one thing is needful, and Mary hath 
chosen that good part, which shall not be' taken 
away from her.” 


84 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward Cooke, Esq. 

Captain of H. M. Ship “ La Sybelle,” 
who received a mortal wound 
in a gallant action 

with the French Frigate “ La Forte,” 
which he captured in Balasore Roads, 
March 1st 1799, and brought to this port 
where he died 23d May 1799, 
aged 26 years. 


Here lieth the body of 
William Johnson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 4th May 1799, 
aged 43 years. 


Here repose the earthly remains of 

Mr. James Miller, 

late Mint Master to the Honourable Company, 
who departed this life July 7th, 1799, in the 
fifty-fourth year of his age. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Elizabeth Beare, 
who was snatched from the bosom of 
an infant and tender family 
at the early age of 22, in childbed, 
on the 3d of August 1799, 
most sincerely regretted 
by her affectionate husband and friends, 
by whom this Monument was erected. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Daniel Munro, Esq. 
who departed this life at Calcutta 
the 26th day of Sept. 1799, aged 39 years. 


Sir John Meredyth, Bart.* 


Here lies the body of 

Mr. George Foreman, 

who died on the 31st October 1799, aged 40 years. 


Here lie the remains of 
Stephen John Edmund Harris, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 6th Nov. 1799, 
aged 19 years, 9 months and 2 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Hugh Rendel. 

He departed this life on the 
31st of December 1799, aged 36 years. 




To the Memory of the Honourable 
Rose 'Whitworth Aylmer, 
who departed this life March 2d, A. D. 1800, 
aged 20 years. 

What was her fate ? long, long before her hour, 
Death called her tender soul, by break of bliss, 
From the first blossoms, to the buds of joy ; 
Those few our noxious fate unblasted leaves 
In this inclement clime of human life. 


Olymphia Greene, 

daughter of Capt. Anthony Greene, 
died the 21st of March 1800, 
aged two years and two months. 


* No date on this stone ; be died 27th Oct. 1799. 


A 


f 


/ l 


hr 


’f * 


/ A • a 

j ■» 

’ A tvi 1 


Margaret- Marianne Binney, 

died 25th March 1800, 
aged two years and three months. 

Tho’ ev’ry grace that dignifies the soul, 

(Presag’d by infant loveliness) had join’d 
To bless thy steps in ev’ry walk of life 
And crown’d thy lengthen’d passage to the grave, 
With bliss eternal, such as now is thine; 

It may be that the mercies of thy God 
But early summons (then not premature) 
Absolv’d thy soul from trials of this world, 

Sav’d thee from all the varied ills of life ; 

Sav’d thee from pains of body, pangs of soul, 
From anguish such as now, bereft of thee, 
Unceasing rends a mourning parent’s breast. 


To the Memory of 

William Clarke, 

departed this life 30th April 1800, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Susan Xsedlie, 
the wife of Robert Ledlie, Esq. 
Barrister at Law. She died in Calcutta 
on the 26th of July in the year 1800, 
the 33d of her age. 


This Monument 
afflicted friendship consecrates 
To the Memory of 

Lieut. Robert Robinson Sheppard, 

Late of the Coast Establishment, 
who departed this life at Calcutta, 
on the 10th day of November 1800, 
in the 23rd year of his age. 
Sheppard, farewell ! farewell ! dear noble youth, 
Belov’d for honor, spirit, sense and truth, 

To Memory sacred. Worth’s unfading ray 
Is fondly cherish’d to our closing day ; 

Oh ! could thy friend an equal course maintain, 
How blest the hope that we might meet again. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edmund Morony, 
who departed this life 
on the third day of November 1800, 
aged 33 years. 

He was gifted with 
i an excellence of heart, an urbanity of manners 
and a benevolence of disposition, 
which seldom came to the lot of one man ; 
and his virtues had so truly endeared him 
to his friends, that it is only when 
Memory shall fail to record them, 
that they can cease to regret his loss. 


■ 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Eobt. McFarlane, 
of Gartartane, in Scotland, free merchant, 
born 3rd November 1727. 

He came to India in the year 1/52, 
and died on the 28th December 1800. 

He ever maintained a character of 
respectability and worth, for his public duty 
was directed by integrity' ; 
his private life by the spirit of Christianity, 
disclosed in acts of generosity and benevolence. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Moscrop, Esq. 
who died in Calcutta on the 14th of January 
in the year 1801, the 44th of his age. 


/ 


' fJ-< ty ' iw*V“ 
/ /t~v . 






j:. 




,/A 





tOSE AYLMER’S GRAVE, 


monument over Bose Aylmer’s grave in 
•here has just been affixed, says the 
a,” a few inches beneath the old epitaph, 
rble tablet on Which is inscribed the elegy- 
age Landor wrote in remembrance of her. 
a on the old tablet runs as follows: — 

EN MEMORY OF 

THE HONORABLE 
ROSE WHITWORTH AYLMER, 

WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE, 

MARCH THE 2ND, A.D. 1800. 

AGED 20 YEARS. 

:s her fate ? Jong, long before her hour 
lied her tender soul, by break of bliiss 
first blossoms, from the buds of joy, 

/ our noxious fate unblasted leaves 
(dement clime of human life, 
hblet adds nothing but Landor ’s verses 
ie:— 

hat avails the sceptred race, 
what the form divine! 
every virtue, every grace! 

■3 Aylmer, all were thine. 

Aylmer, whom these wakeful eyes 
weep, but never see, 
ht of memories and of sighs 
! msecrate to thee. 


Landor’s "Rose Aylmer.” 

To the Editor of “The Standard.” 

Sir, — It is interesting to compare Landor’s perfect 
gem with the following quotations from “The 
.Minstrel,'’ and another short poem fey his prede- 
cessor, James Beattie: — 

“Ah, what avails the lore of Greece and Rome, 

Tho lay, heaven-prompted? ” etc. 

“ Those forms of bright perfection, which tbe bard. 
Enamoured, oonsepraies,” etc, 

“ He sleeps in dust — 

He whom each virtue fired, each grace refined.” 

“ In her each sentiment sublime is joined 
To female softness, and a form divine.” 

“Ah. Beauty’s bloom avails not in the grave!” 

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, 

J. W. WHITE. 

1 36, Dalkeith-road, Hulwich, S.E. 


WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR. 



I 


dealt with to-day. Sir Gilbert Parker mat 
another telling speech against the Budget la 
night. (Page 9.) 

A meeting of the Preston Liberal Associate 
will be held on September 17, when the rel 
tions of Mr. Cox, M.P., and the Liberal par 
of the borough wall be considered. (Page 5.) 

Mr. T. M. Healy, in a statement to one 
our representatives, yesterday, replied to t 
attack made upon him bv Mr. J. Redmond 
the “Freeman’s Journal,” and justified t 
action that ho took on the Budget Bill in t 
House of Commons on Friday last. (Page 4 

Imperial and Foreign. 

Commander Peary, in telegrams reeeiv 
from him yesterday, advances the definite cla 
to have been the first to discover the Noi 
Pole. The expedition saw no trace of I 
Cook. The latter delivered his lecture bef< 


“ Whatever share is uudertaken by 0 
sea Dominions, I am of opinion that 
they like to do must be under their m fl 
and administration. If the Gover ft 
home interferes in any way, it will j $ 
Dominions in a subordinate position -4 
they ought not to be. I have hea^fl 
danger arising from the Domini Jl 
J - U eir own fleets. That is a cold argv J'f 
ve got to stand together, to rise- M 
ther. It is thought that theri* | 
ager that the Dominions may dr . 'f J 
ves independent. Well, and if tl 
going to. oppose them ? You do -m 
it the Old Country is ever goiijhfjB 
> had a good lesson in the Am - J 
s yc&rs ago. If the Dominion, tajl 
re themselves independent fro 1 
mtry, it would be very regjr- ^'1* 
y have_ a perfect right to chip* ] 
not believe that there is a shaj oi J 
a chance of their doing so.”— ui: ” 


THE FLOODS IN M CL 


WAVE FORTY-FIVE FEI Hi 


_ MEXICO Cljb 

Despatches received from Mo; % 
floods yesterday ruined a lar»e f • • 
Zamora district. A cloudbu; Mi . 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Harriet Hunt, 

wife of Philip Hunt, 

Obt. 26th January 1801, jEtatis 21 years. 
Rest, gentle Harriet, rest in peace, 

Secure from vanity and noise ; 

For here thy earthly sorrows cease, 

From hence commence thy heavenly joys ; 
Short was thy span, — 'tis past, tis gone, 
Early thou reach’d th’ appointed goal, 
Freed from it’s clogs, and upwards flown, 
Angels received thy spotless soul. 

Her ways were ways ot pleasantness, 

And all her paths were peace. 


Here lieth the body of 
Capt. H. Carey, 
who departed this life 
Feb. 26th, 1801, aged 34 years. 


Richard Thoroton, 

Died 14th March 1801, 
aged 4 years, 7 months and 15 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. David Idacalester, 

who departed this life on the 
16th of March 1801, aged 30 years. 


Peter Liaing, 

Died April 26th 1801, aged 7 days. 


To the Memory of 
Thomas Halket, Esq. 
of the Honorable Company’s Civil Service, 
who departed this life on the 28th of April 1801, 
in the 21st year of his age. 

Hapless flower, by fate prevented, 

Ere to blossom scarce began ; 

Early in thy doom lamented, 

For full soon thy course is ran ; 

Lately we beheld him leading 
Artful pleasure’s gay career ; 

Soon, alas ! stern death succeeding, 

Veil’d him in the silent bier. 

Some of us, perhaps, to-morrow, 

Like our friend, may meet their doom ; 
Freely then indulge your sorrow, 

O’er his much lamented tomb. 


To the Memory of 

Harriet, and Caroline Augusta Smith, 

Daughters of J. B. Smith, Esq. 
of the Civil Service on this establishment. 
Harriet, 

born October 17th 1784, died May 3rd 1801. 
Caroline Augusta, 

born August 20th, 1794, died May 30th, 1800. 


Sacre aux reliques. 
George Richard Foley, 
Qui Mouru’t Heme Mai 1801, 
Age 48 Ans. 

Ce Monument est construit 
par Une Amie. 


To the Memory of 
Edward Eyre Burges, Esq. 

Senior merchant in the service of 
the Honorable East India Company ; 
he died May the 23rd, 1801, aged 58 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Frances Smith, 

Daughter of (the late) Bryan Scotney, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 30th day 
of May in the year of our Lord Christ 1801, 
aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

John Wilson, 

A man whose virtues endeared him 
to his friends and to society. 

He died on the 3rd Juue 1801, 
aged 38 years. 

In the adjoining Tomb are deposited 
the remains of Jean Wilson, 
whose death he deplored as the heaviest affliction 
and whom he did not long survive. 

They were lovely in their lives, 
and by death they are again united. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jean Wilson, 

Daughter of the late Mr. John Hunter, 
Kilmarnock, 

who died the 29th of April 1800, aged 30 years. 


In Memory of 
Mr. James Scott, 

Died 11th June 1801, aged 32 years. 
Also his daughter, 
Elizabeth Scott, 

Died 18th April 1800, 
aged 2 years and 14 days. 


Capt. Robert Ingledew, 

died 18th June 1801, aged 29 years. 


Mrs. Anne Tomkins, 

died Dec. 1st 1801, aged 18 years. 


Here lieth the body of 
Miss Adelaide Berrie, 
daughter of William Berrie, Esq. 
departed this life 18th Dec. 1801, 
aged 5 years 11 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anne Hayes, the wi r e of 
Thomas Hayes, Esq. of the Hon. 

East India Company’s Service, 
who departed this life on board the 
“ Sir Stephen Lushington,” Indiaman, 
on the 29th of December 1801, aged 26 years. 
A tender parent, a sincere friend, 

Lov’d in her life, lamented in her end. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Dickson, wife of 
Cornet R. L. Dickson, 2d Regt. Nat. Cavalry, 
Obiit 20th Feb. 1802, vEt. 20 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master John Sutler, 

son of J ohn and Lydia Elizabeth Butler, 
who departed this life of the small-pox 
on the 3d March 1802, 
aged 2 years, 8 months and 9 days. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
parents as a lasting testimony of their love. 

“ The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away ; 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Mr. John Willcocks,* aged 49. 

* No date on this stone ; he died April 5th 1802, 




80 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Here lieth the remains of 
Miss Mary Chollet, 

who departed this life on the 14th of April 1802, 
aged 24 years and 6 months. 


Captain R. Tulloh, 

Obiit 6th May 1802, Hit. 38. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catharine Elizabeth Lynch, 

the wife of Captain Francis Lynch, who departed 
this life on the 21st of July 1802, 
aged 19 years, 1 month and 4 days. 

A tender parent, a sincere friend, 

Lov’d in her life, lamented in her end. 


This Monument is Sacred 
to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Arthur, 
who departed this life on the 
14th day of Sept. 1802, aged 37 years. 


D. Hossack, 

Master Pilot in the 
Honorable Company’s Service, 
died 15th Sept. 1802, aged 40 years. 


To the Memory of 
Ebenezer Coleman, Esq. 
who died 16th Sept. 1802, aged — years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Edward Shapcote, of the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 18th of Oct. 1802, 
aged 29 years. 

O ! where my soul, is there a friend so just ? 

Or after thee, a man I can so trust. 


To the Memory of 
John Bristow, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 
20th of October, 1802, aged 52 years. 


A. Moorhead, 

carpenter of the “ United Kingdom,” 
died 7th Nov. 1802, aged 63 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Mason, late Purser 
of the Honorable Company’s Ship “ Baring,” 
who departed this life the 24th Nov. 1802, 
aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward Dashwood, 
eldest son of Thomas Dashwood, Esq. 

who departed this life 
the 22d of Dec. 1802, aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Horton Briscoe, 

Major General on the Bengal Establishment, 
who departed this life 
the 25th day of December 1802, aged 61 years. 
This meritorious Officer 

during a period of 40 years of unremitted service, 
Distinguished himself by his attachment 
to his profession ; 

ever zealous in the discharge of its duties, 
fulfiling them 

with fidelity and integrity to the State ; 
and honor and credit to himself as a 
man ; while good nature, hospitality, 
and kindness of heart, 


are considered as estimable qualities, 
so long will be remembered and regretted 
by a numerous circle of friends, by one of whom 
this tribute to departed worth is offered. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Kennedy, Esq. 

Assistant Surgeon, 
who died December 1802. 

His death has deprived his profession 
and society of one of their greatest ornaments 
and numerous friends will long and sincerely 
lament his loss. 


Here reposeth the body of 
Mr. John Lawrence, 

who departed this life on the 
19th day of January 1803, aged 17 years. 
This Monument was erected by his 
beloved uncle, Captain David Parker. 


Here lie the body of 
Joshua Whittall, 

who departed this life on the 
23d of Jan. A. D. 1803, aged 27 years. 

Lieut. -Col. Kearnan, 

departed this life, 

on the 5th February 1803, aged 52 years. 


Thomas Hollingbery, 

died the 9th Feb. 1803, aged 26 years and 
6 months. 

(In all things sincere). 


Mary Ann Samson, 

departed this life Feb. 23d 1803, 
aged 11 months, 3 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Jacob Christian V. Deurs, 

the infant son of G. A. V. Deurs, Esq. 
who was born the 24th October 1800, 
and died the 9th March, 1803. 


To the Memory of 
Henry Frost, Esq. 
i Captain on the Marine Establishment at Bombay, 
and late commander of the “ Mornington” Cruizer, 
in which capacity 

he distinguished himself by the capture of the 
French Privateer “ Eugene,” 
and by other public services. 

Obt. Calcutta, March 15th 1803, HStat. 30. 

In his premature death was regretted 
the loss of a gallant officer, 
a warm friend, and a worthy man. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Thomas, 

relict of the late Mr. John Thomas, 
who departed this life April 6th, 1803, 
aged 50 years. 

This Monument is erected by her 
disconsolate daughter, Elizabeth Thomas. 


To the Mem on,’ of 
John Macdonald, 

who died 9th May 1803, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Mary Sherwood, 

who departed this life May 28th 1803, 
aged 1 year and 9 months. 




SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


87 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Gatton, 

who departed this life 30th May 1803, 
aged 25 years and 5 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Amelia Hopkins, 
who departed this life, June 8th, 1803, 
aged 24 years. 


To the Memory of 
Henry John Darell, Esq. 
of Cale Hill in the county of Kent, 
who died the 7th July 1803, aged 31 years. 


To the Memory of 
Bernard Maccullum, Esq. 
who died the 22nd July, 1803, aged 60 years. 


To the Memory of 

William Archibald Edmonstone, Esq. 

eldest son of Sir Archibald Edmonstone, Bart. 

as a tribute of respect and fraternal affection, 
this monument is erected. 

Obiit. 7th Septembris, A. D. 1803. ^Etatis 45. 
(on the west side.) 

“ Is there not an appointed time for man upon 
earth ? 

“ Are not his days also like the days of an 
hireling ? 

“ The eye of him that hath seen him shall see 
him no more ?” 

“ The dust hath returned to the earth as it was, 
and the spirit hath returned to God who gave it.” 

“ This corruptible hath put on incorruption, 
and this mortal hath put on immortality.” 

“ Blessed be the God and father of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant 
mercy hath begotten us again into a living hope 
by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. , 
To an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled and 
that fadeth not away.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Thomas Edward Creighton, 

Mariner in the country service, 
who died much regretted, 

13th September 1803, aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Eliza Hart Turner, 
born Dec. 10th 1802, died Sept. 24th 1803. 
Also 

Mr. George TVroughton Turner, 

born May 14th 1801, died May 24th 1807. 


To the Memory of 

Alexander Patrick Johnstone, Esq. 
late on the Bengal Civil Establishment 
of the Honorable East India Campany, 
who expired on the 11th November 1803, 
aged twenty-five years, eleven months and one 
day, who, to the strictest integrity, 
and to uncommon maturity of judgment, 
united the mildest manners ; 
extensive benevolence ; 
and all the social and tender affections ; 
under the guidance of which principles, 
he invariably maintained the character of 
a public officer 

with credit and honor to himself ; 


and discharged, 

in the most pious and exemplary manner, 
the various duties of 

a son, a brother, a husband, a father and a friend. 
To commemorate those virtues, 
this Monument has been erected by her 
who is best able to judge of their influence and 
effects ; and who is anxious to record this testimony 
of the felicity of their conjugal union, 
during a period of nearly four years ; 
of the affection, love, gratitude, and reverence 
which she feels for his memory ; 
and of the deep and indelible anguish which 
the premature loss of him has impressed upon her 
mind. 


To the Memory of 
John Campbell, M. D. 

Assistant Surgeon in the Sendee of 
the Honorable East India Company, 
who was carried off by a fever, 
at the General Hospital, Presidency, on the 
19th November 1803, at the early age of 24. 
Eheu ! Fugaces ! 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Arthur, 

who departed this life 23rd November, 1803, 
in the 24th year of her age. 

Her mind and person were adorned 
with grace and accomplishments, 
and her heart was enobled by virtues, 
that endeared her 
to all her acquaintance. 

In the various relations of 
wife, daughter, sister, and friend, 
her duty and affection were unlimited. 

She sustained with Christian fortitude a mother's 
pain, but survived not long to participate 
a mother’s joy. 

A more benign and amiable spirit, 
never winged its way to heaven. 


Sacred to the Momorv of 
Mr. Philip Butticaz, 

late Chief Officer of the “ Hugh Inglis,” 
he departed this life 

the 8th day of December 1803, aged 27. 

He was a most deserving officer 
and beloved by all that knew him. 

This Monument was erected 
by his friend and shipmate, Capt. Franklin, 
by desire of his much esteemed friend and protec- 
tor, Mr. Leeth, of Harrow in England. 


Beneath this stone is deposited 
the body of 

Mrs. Elvina Ursula Sutton, 

who departed this life, December 14th 1803. 
Aged 42 years. 


Captain John Palmer, 

of the ship “ Experiment.” 
Nat. 1777, Ob. 1803. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain John Horn, 

who departed this life on the 
17th January 1804, aged 39 years. 


88 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the memory of 

Frances Elisabeth Sutton Gray, 

who departed this life January 20th 1804, 
in the 41st year of her age. 

Leaving a family of nine children 
to lament their loss. 

This Monument is erected by her 
affectionate husband, 
in testimony of respect and esteem 
for the many eminent and excellent qualities 
she possessed, as a wife, a mother and a friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lady (Charlotte Elizabeth) Hesilrige, 

daughter of the late Capt. and Mrs. F. E. S. Gray, 
and the w'ife of Capt. Henry William Wilkinson, 
B. N. I. 

who departed this life at sea 8th January 1817, 
in the 35th year of her age. 

After a most severe and painful illness, which 
she bore with exemplary fortitude and resignation. 
A most affectionate Wile, 

A tender parent, and a most sincere friend, 
Loved during life, and lamented in her end. 


In Memory of 

Captain Lawrence Henderson, 

who departed this life, January 29th 1804, 
aged forty-two years. 

Much regretted and lamented 
by all his acquaintance. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

J. S. Engel, Esq. 

who died on the 22nd February A. D. 1804, 
aged 68 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain 'William Mackay, 
who died 27th March 1804, aged 22 years. 
This marble would express, 
the affections of relations and esteem of friends, 
for him whose characteristics 
were unaffected worth and manly fortitude, 
in how eminent a degree, 
he possessed the latter quality, 
his interesting narrative 
of the Ship-wreck of the Juno, 
will testify to future times. 


Under this stone lie the remains of 

Caroline, 

the wife of Captain George Baynliam, 
of H. M. Ceylon Regt. of Infantry, 

(the best of wives and the best of mothers) 
she died on the 1st May 1804, aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Mercer, 
daughter of Mr. Charles Weston, 
who departed this life on the 29th May 1804, 
at the early age of 27 years, 3 months and 5 days 
a tender mother, an affectionate wife, 
and a dutiful daughter, 
loved and lamented by those who knew her. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Ann Haywood, 
wife of Isaac Haywood, 
who departed this life 
on the 30th day of May 1804, 
aged 17 years and 7 months. 

“ Comfort ye, comfort ye my people, saith your 
God.” Is. XL. 1. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Grace Depstell, 

who departed this life 
June 23d 1804, aged 12 years. 


To the Memory of 
Frederick Williams, 
who departed this life 24th July 1804, 
aged 6 months and 14 days. 


Elizabeth Ross, 

the infant daughter of D. Ross, Esq. 
born 20th August 1803, and Obit 1st August 1804. 
“ Suffer little children to come unto me 
and forbid them not, for of such is the 
Kingdom of God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Eliza Colebrooke, 
who departed this life 
the 9th August 1804, aged 1 year. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. W. Somerville, 

Nat. December 5th 1786, 
August 18th 1804, Mort. e 
Hia. jux 18, 

Quam multium flebelis ; 
Unico Fratriamicoque imposuit 
Alexander Mackenzie. 


Captain John Wright, 

who departed this life September 1st 1804, 
aged 42 years. 

This Monument is erected by his friends, 
Messrs. Colvin, Bazett and Co. 


To the Memory of 
Richard Edmund Rudd, Esq. 
who departed this life September 6th 1804, 
aged 35 years. 


Here lies deposited the mortal part of 
Benjamin L. Hughes, Esq. 
who departed this life the 8th September 1804, 
aged 33 years. 

To the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Harriet Hughes, 

who departed this life on the 
14th day of September 1804, aged 20 years, 
universally beloved and esteemed, 
and now deeply lamented by all her acquaintance. 


Hie depositum est quod Mortale fuit, 
Joannis Caixlfield, 

Hac vita Sept. 25th, Anno. 1804. 
Hitat suffi trigisimo tertio Erepiti. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Susana Weldon, 
who departed this life 6th November, 1804 ; 
aged 28 years ; 
also of her daughter, 

Miss Catherine 'W'eldon, 
who died 5th February, 1802, aged 11 years. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


89 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Ede, 
who died at Calcutta on the 
22d day of November 1804, 
aged 35 years, 1 month and 3 days ; 
she was the affectionate mother of two sons, 
James, born on the 22d November 1790, 
and George, born the 4th June 1792. 

In testimony of his love and esteem for her virtues, 
this Monument was erected by her husband, 
James Ede. 

‘ ‘ Shall we receive good at the hand of the Lord 
and shall we not receive evil ?” — Isaiah. 


Here lies the body of Mrs. M. G. Kramer, 
wife of the late Adjutant Kramer of the 
Dutch Company’s Service, Chinsurah, who de- 
parted this life November 23, 1804, aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Margaret Maria Moscrop, 

■who departed this life Dec. 7, 1804, aged 15 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

John Allen, 

(son of Richard Allen, Esq. of Chittagong) 
who died while at Serampore School, 
December 13th 1804, aged 10 years. 

Why should I say 'Tis yet too soon, 

To seek for Heaven or think of death ; 

A flower may fade before ’tis noon, 

And I this day may lose my breath. 

To the Memory of Airs. Elizabeth Hunt, 
wife of P. Hunt, who departed this life 
full of faith, hope and joy, 
on the 14th December 1804, 
aged eighteen years and three months. 

“ Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.” 
Likewise her son Anthony Hunt, 
who departed this life on the 13th September 1804, 
aged 9 months and 16 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Wemyss Orrok, Esq. 

Late commander of the Honourable Company’s 
Ship “ Lord Nelson,” 
who departed this life on the 
11th day of January 1805, aged 54 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Hastings Impey, Esq. 

Son of Sir Elijah Impey, 

ifactor in the Service of the East India Company, 
who died in the 24th year of his age, 
February 4th 1805. 

With gentle manners, and with modest worth, 
'Meekly he spent his destin’d course on earth, 
*Belov’d, and most by those who knew him best ; 
'Deep were his virtues on their hearts impress’d ; 
The dutious son, fond brother, and kind friend, 
Are each deplor’d in his untimely end. 

Vi vat Anima Beata ? 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wells, 

daughter of Mr. George Gooding, 
and wife of Mr. Joseph Wells, 
who departed this life on the 11th day of May, 
in the year of our Lord 1805, 
aged 16 years and 29 days. 

A dutiful wife and an affectionate daughter ; 
in love she lived and in peace she died, 
greatly regretted. 

N 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. William Cumming, 

who departed this life on the 
13th of May, 1805, aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Johnson, 
late Conductor of Ordnance 
on the Bengal Military Establishment, 
who departed this life on the 
13th of May 1805, aged 42 years. 


To the Memory of 
Captain George French, 

Assistant Deputy Master Attendant in the 
Service of the Honourable East India Company, 
who departed this life on the 31st May 1805, 
aged 56 years. 


Here lieth the body of Mr. James Moat, 
of the Honourable Company’s Marine Service, 
who departed tins life on the 14th June 1805. 


To the Memory of Catharine Parker, 

who departed this life on the 23d of July 1805, 
aged 2 years and 8 months. 


John Linley Cantelo, 

Obiit July 29th 1805. 


Sacred to the Memory of C. Greene, 
Major General on the staff, 
and Commandant of Artillery, 
who departed this life 31st July, 1805, 
aged 58 years. 

During a period of 36 years, 
he distinguished himself 
by his attachment to his profession, 
ever zealous in the discharge of its duties, and 
fulfilling them with fidelity and integrity 
to the state. 


Secred to the Memory of Mary, 
the wife of Charles Becher, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 
10th day of August 1805, aged 23 years. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth, 
wife of Mr. John Lewis, 
who departed this life 6th October 1805, 
aged 20 years. 

A tender parent, a sincere friend, 

Lov’d in her life, lamented in her end. 


To the Memory of the 
Reverend Thomas Francis Hartwell, 

Chaplain on this Establishment, 
who died at Madras on the 29th of October 1805, 
aged 27 years and 3 months. 

In vain would weeping melancholy bind 
Around this sacred urn the cypress shade, 

No gloom attend his memory, for his mind 
Reflects a radiance which can never fade. 

Our deep regret, our chasten’d sorrow mourn 
The loss of one with piety so fraught ; 

His smiles could lure the sinner to return 
Alike by practice and by precept taught. 

But not from us can flow the suffrage due 
A higher tribute shall his worth proclaim, 
Religion will lament a son so true 
And virtue celebrate her vot’ry’s name. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND 


SO 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Elizabeth Fagan, 

who after a painful and lingering illness, 
borne with fortitude, 
and submitted to with resignation, 
departed this life, on the 10th of November, 1805, 
in the 32d year of her age. A husband, 
whose youthful attachment was confirmed by 
reflection, and not impaired by absence ; 
and a brother, 

in whom the affectionate intercourse of childhood 
was the earnest of the protecting 
kindness of riper years, 
have erected this Monument, 
the Memorial of a wife and of a sister, 
by her virtues, not less than by those ties tenderly 
endeared to both, with a mind highly cultivated, 
and every essential quality of the heart 
and understanding, she united 
a mild dignity of manners that won the affections, 
while it ensured the respect of all who knew her. 
Whosoever thou art, 
whom grief or melancholy leads to this 
unfrequented spot, thou hast probably, 
a daughter, a sister, and a wife, and perhaps a friend ; 
pause over the tomb of one, whose untimely end 
did not prevent her to have discharged, 
in a manner eminently exemplary, 
the duties of all those various relations of life. 
Impressed with the full extent 
of the loss they have sustained, 
her numerous relations will ever cherish and 
revere her Memory. Her husband, 
whose early discernment of her exalted merit 
constituted the pride and happiness of his days, 
will rest his consolation 
on the hope of imitating those virtues 
which have secured to her a blessed immortality. 


Mrs. A. E. 'Wedderburn, 

Relict of Hy. Wedderburn, Esq. 
who fulfilled every relative duty of life, 
as wife, mother, daughter and sister, 
with the highest credit to herself, 
and whose virtues were an honour to her sex. 
In gratitude for her sisterly love and bounty, 
her affectionate brother 
inscribed this humble tribute : 

Sacred to her Memory, 
whose love by the Grace of Almighty God 
is in Heaven. Deceased A. D. 1805, aged 55. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Ann Mendes, 

who departed this life February 26, 1808, 
aged 22 years ; 

Wife of Mr. W. Mendes. 
this Monument is erected to her Memory 
by her disconsolate mother, Mrs. Smith. 


Mr. John Harvey, 

late chief officer of the ship “ Henry Wellesley,” 
who departed this life March 27th 1806, aged 27 


Lawrence Gall, Esq 

Obit. 27th April 1806, aged 61 years. 

. Of misfortunes, my good friend, 
you have had a certain portion ; pass that by, 
you have been a very — very good son ; 
as kind a brother ; 
a tender and affecionate husband ; 
one to be numbered among the best of fathers ; 


a faithful friend ; a humane benefactor, 
and a strictly honest man. 

( On the reverse :) 

This is Liawrence Gall’s tomb, 
consecrated by his son and daughters ; 

as a testimony of filial affection 
which has superseded all other duties. 

It was thy fate O Gall, to live 
long enough to see thyself neglected 
by those friends who ought to have served thee. 

To thee and thine fortune has been unkind. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Honing’S, 
late a Capt. in the 66 Regt. B. N. I. 

Died at Lucknow, 22nd Feb. 1847, aged 33 years. 


Elizabeth Ross, 

the infant daughter of D. Ross, Esq. 
born 20th August, 1803, 
and Obit 1st August, 1804. 

“Suffer little children to come unto me and for- 
bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God, ’ ’ 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Eliza Ann, 

Daughter of Henry and Helen Mathew, 
who departed this life on the 28th April 1806, 
aged 1 year, 2 months and 26 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Carnegy, Esq. M. D. 
who departed this life on the 23rd May, 1806, 
aged 63 years. 


Thomas Roileau, 

born the 14 th of December 1754, 
and died on the 11th June 1806. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Boyd, Esq. 

Head Surgeon at this Presidency, 
who departed this life on the 
16th of July 1806, aged 60 years. 


To the Memory of 

Francis Peregrine Kinloch, Esq. 
Son of Sir James Kinloch, Bart, 
Obit 24th August 1806, aged 58. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. BE. Dennison, 

aged 26 years. And her infant daughter, 
who were here interred on the 
30th September 1806. 

And of Capt. E. S. Dennison, 
who survived his wife and child but a few days, 
for on the 16th of October 
followed their decease, 

He was united to them in death, 
and buried in the same grave beneath this 
Monument, in the 31st year of his age. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Robert Raban 'VP’ilson, 
the infant son of Lieut. -Col. Samuel Wilson, 
of the Bombay Establishment, 
who was born on the 15th of August 
and departed this life on the 14th of Oct. 1806, 
aged 2 months. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


91 


To the Memory of 
Alexander Allardice, Esq. 
who departed this life, 

on the 2d November A. D. 1806, aged 50 years, 
much respected and lamented by his friends, 
and all who had the pleasure of knowing him. 


To the Memory of Master A. Allardice, 
son of Alexander Allardice, Esq. 
who departed this life 26th February 1807, 
aged 4 years, 3 months and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret, 
wife of Philip Dundas, Esq. 
Governor of Prince of Wales Island, 
died in Calcutta 7th Nov. 1806. 


Here lies the body of 
Henry Foxall Hall, 

who departed this life on the 
21st Nov. 1806, aged nearly 4 years. 
To his Memory 

this Monument has been erected by his 
afflicted parents, John and Jean Hall. 


Here lies the body of 
Alexander Hare Hall, 

who departed this life, on the 12th April 1808, 
aged 1 year 7 months. 

To his Memory this Monument is erected 
by his afflicted parents, John and Jean Hall. 


Robert Talbot, 

died 21st Nov. 1806, aged 3 months. 


To the Memory of 
Mr. Janies Wittamore, 

Master in the H. C. Pilot Service, 
who departed this life on the 
15th of December 1806, aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Air. '^Villiam Howe, 

who departed this life on the 1st January 1807, 
in the 27th year of his age. 

This modest stone, what few vain marbles can, 
May truly say, here lies an honest man. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Susanna Aggs, 
who departed this life on the 
7th January 1807, aged 41 years. 


To the Memory of 

William Towshend Jones, Esq. 
Attorney at Law, 

who departed this life 24th January 1807, 
aged 50 years. 

Much respected and lamented by a numerous 
acquaintance. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. E. S. Frissell, 

Assistant to the Resident at Poona, 
a young man whose superior abilities, 
extraordinary attainments, and high integrity, ren- 
dered him an ornament to public and private life. 
He died on the 2d of February 1807, 
aged — years. 


Sacred to the. Memory of 
Arthur Hastings Vansittart, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Service, 
who died on the 19th February, 1807, 
aged 33 years. 

v 2 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Daly, Esq. lute of Madras, 
who departed this life April 18th, 1807. 
This Monument is erected by his 
widow, Rachael Susanna Daly. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Eleanora Sophia Mackintosh, 

(wife of Lachlan Mackintosh) ; 
a woman who united in the most eminent degree 
the virtues of a real Christian 
and a most dutiful and affectionate 
wife, mother, and sister. 

She died on the 15th May, 1807, aged 52 years. 

In Memory also of her son Eneas, 
who died on the 6th June 1807, aged 14 mouihs. 


This Monument is erected by 
Major Christopher Johnston, 

H. M. 8th Light Dragoons, to the Memory of 
Cornet Andrew Johnston, 
late of the above Regiment, 
who died May 16, 1807, aged 31 years. 


Here are deposited the remains of 
Capt. 'William 'Warden, 
who died in command of his Majesty's 
ship “Rattlesnake,” in the Bay of Bengal, 
on the 5th June 1807, aged 28 years. 

To commemorate the private worth and professional 
merits of the promising officer, this Monument 
is erected by his Commander-in-Chief 
as a tribute of regard to his Memory. 

To the Memory of Capt. William Cheever, 
of the American ship “Mount Vernon,” 
who departed this life on the 27th June 1807, 
aged 33 years. 


To the Memory of 'Mr. William Brown, 
who departed this life July 2d, 1808, 
aged 48 years. 

Also Mrs. Mary Brown, 
who departed this life Nov. 10th, 1807. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mary Beewun, 

a native Christian, distinguished by her piety 
and virtue, who died in the 36th year of her age, 
August 9th A. D. 1807. 


Guliemus J ackson, 

Obit XXIV. dies Augusti, A. D. MDCCCVII, 
TEtatis suae LIV. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. William Macdougal, 
of the Bengal Engineers, 
who died September the 16th A. D. 1807, 
aged 27 years. 

To an excellent understanding, and extensive 
knowledge, especially of Asiatic Literature, 
which enabled 

him to discharge with credit and puplic utility, 
the duties of Assistant Professor of the 
Hindoostanee language 
in the College of Fort William : 

The united principles of 

religion, integrity, and honor, which rendered him 
universally esteemed and respected, 
and the most amiable disposition and manners, 
which endeared him to all who knew him. 
Maltesille bonis flebilis ocudit ; 

Nulli flebeliar quam Milii. 


92 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Thompson, Esq. 
senior merchant on the Bengal 
Civil Establishment 
of the Honorable East India Company, 
who departed this life on the 1st October 1807, 
on board the Honorable Company’s ship “Union” 
at Saugor Roads, aged 46 years. 

To the Memory of Capt. Denis Bodkin, 
of Id. M. 67th Regt. Light Infantry, 
who departed this life on the 7th Oct. 1807, 
aged 26 years. 

This Monument, a tribute of esteem and affection, 
was erected by his brother-officers. 


To the Memory of 
Thomas Biell, Esq. 
of the H. C. Civil Service, 
who departed this life 23d October, 1807, 
aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
The late William Doughty, 

who departed this life November 21st, 1807, 
aged 38 years. 


In Memory of 

George Urquhart Eawtie, Esq. 
Obiit 25th November, 1807, iEtat 55 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Hannah Bobinson, 
who departed this life on the 
25th November 1807, aged 54 years. 
Afflictions sore long time I bore, 
Which wore my strength away, 

And made me long for endless rest, 
That never will decay. 


To the Memory ol Chidley Coote, Esq. 

Surgeon on this Establishment, 
and nephew of Sir Eyre Coote, K. B. 
who died 5th December, 1807, aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Maria Hodgkinson, 

wife of Mr. C. Hodgkinson. 

By a faithful discharge of 
the duties of a pious and humane Christian, 
affectionate wife, tender mother, 
and a sincere friend ; 

by the capacity, sympathy and benevolence of her 
mind, and the practice of every virtue 
which could adorn the longest life ; she attracted 
love, esteem and admiration upon earth ; 
but she finished her course also too early, 
on the 22nd December 1807, aged 29 years. 
Leaving a husband and five infants 
to experience her loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Thomas "Ward Howard, 

of the Bengal Native Infantry, 
who departed this life the 24 th December 1807, 
aged 42 years. 


To the Memory of 
James Edmiston, Esq. 

of the Honorable Company’s Civil Service, 
who died on the 31st Dec. 1807, aged 40 years. 


To the Memory of 
Mr. James Bourbon, 

w T ho departed this life December 31st, 1807, 
Aged 31 years. 

An affectionate husband, a tender father, 
and a sincere friend. 


To the Memory of Mr. Thomas Carr, 
of the Honorable Company’s Pilot Service, 
who died January 9th, 1808, aged 67 years. 

By nature form’d for every social part, 

Mild were his manners and sincere his heart. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Spottiswoode, 

wife of Thomas Spottiswoode, Esq. 
who died on the X. of January MDCCCVIII. 
having tenderly endeared herself in the various 
relations of daughter, wife, mother, and friend, 
at the early age of nineteen. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Mary Ives, 

who departed this life on the 11th January 1808, 
aged 19 years. 

Of excellence, a pattern here is laid ; 

In life a faithful friend, and honor’d wife, 
Nature’s great debt in humble hope she paid, 
To rise to Angel’s bliss and endless life. 


To the Memory of' the late John Hard, 
aged 22 years, one month and 15 days, 
wffio died on the 13th January 1808. 
Erected by his beloved sister Maria Stacchney. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charlotte Hunter, 

w y ife of William Hunter, M. D. 
w'ho on the 19th of February 1808, 
calmly resigned 

a life spent in the exercise of genuine piety, 
and in the zealous and affectionate 
discharge of filial, conjugal, parental and social 
duties, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory and to the virtues of 
Mrs. Frances Fombelle, 
the wife of Mr. John Fombelle, 
a Senior Alerchant in the Service 
of the East India Company in Bengal, 
who departed this transitory life 
on Friday, the 8th day of April 1808, 
aged 40 years. 

“In the Pious hope of a joyful Resurrection, 
through the Alediation of her Blessed Redeemer.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Cherry Cook, 

wife of Mr. William Cook, of the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life April 25, 1808, 
aged twenty-six years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

John Sheppy Drury, 

first Lieutenant of his Majesty’s Ship “Modeste,” 
who died 29th April 1808, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain John Galloway, 
who died 16th May 1808, aged 34 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Peter Henry, 

of his Majesty’s fourteenth Regiment of Infantry, 
son of Mr. Thomas Henry, F. R. S., London, 
and President of the Literary and Philosophical 
Society of Manchester. 

His zeal in the discharge of the duties of 
his profession, 

his uniform kindness to the subalterns and privates 
of the Regt., and his friendly and social disposi- 
tion, joined to his other virtues, 
rendered his death a source of real sorrow 
to the officers of the distinguised corps 
in which he had served above ten years. 

He died June 4th, 1808, aged 24 years. 


In Memory of 
Mr. Frederic Jacobi, 
who departed this life the 12th June 1808, 
aged 61 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Charles Matthew, 

son of Helen and Henry Matthew, 
born 17th September 1807, died 27th June 1808. 
aged 10 months and 10 days. 


Here lie the remains of Sophia, 
daughter of John and Mary Fendall, 
born the 27th April 1805, died the 28th July 1808. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Duncan, Esq. 
born the 24th April 1752, 
in the Parish of Manchester, in the county of 
Aberdeen, died August 1st, 1808, 
aged 50 years, 2 months and 26 days. 

He was a dutious son, and affectionate husband, 
and at all times a kind friend to the poor and needy. 


Elere lies the remains of 
Mrs. Catharine Jeykell Browne, 

who departed this life on the 
8th day of August 1808, aged 38 years. 
She was an excellent wife, and a most 
affectionate mother. 


In Memory of Mrs. Anne Judah, 
who died 11th August 1808, aged 29 years. 
“ She was adorned with meekness and chose 
that good part, which shall not be taken 
away from her.’ 1 Luke 10, verse 42. 
What then is this essential thing 
Which did relief and comfort bring, 

E’en in the view of death ! 

God’s favour shown thro’ Christ the Lord ; 
This can alone true peace afford, 

And certain hope in death. 

This tribute of affection was erected by her 
husband, C. A. Judah. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Peter McArthur, 
who departed this life August 20, 1808, 
aged 32 years. 

Also Mr. V/illiam McArthur, 

who departed this life May 28, 1808, aged 45 years. 
This tribute to fraternal affections 
erected by their brother, John McArthur. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Lavalin Savage, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Establishment, 
who whilst in the vigour of youth 
and exercise of every manly virtue, 
was cut off from this world by a malignant 
disorder, on the 30th day of August 1808, 
in the 23d year of his age. 

A most engaging simplicity of manners ; 

Becoming modesty, unshaken constancy 
in friendship ; a warm, true, and 
high sense of honor ; 
secured to this excellent young man 
the affections of all who knew him. 

In remembrance of his virtues, 
and as a mark of their indelible regret at his death 
his most intimate friends 
have caused this Monument to be erected. 


Here lieth the body of 
Henry Wakeman, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 29th Sept. 1808, 
aged 19 years. 

“ Man cometh up and is cut down like a flower, 
he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never 
continueth in one stay.” 

This Monument is erected by an afflicted parent 
lamenting the premature death of a much 
beloved son. 


John Walker, Esq. 

died on the 18th of October 1808, aged 25 years. 


Here lieth the body of 

Henry Swinhoe, Esq. 

Attorney at Law, 

who departed this life on the 27th Oct. 1808, 
aged 56 years and 3 months. 

He ever proved himself a virtuous man, 
a tender husband, and a most indulgent father. 
This Monument is erected to his Memory, 
by his afflicted wife, Jane Swinhoe. 

Also of Airs. Jane Swinhoe, 
relict of Henry Swinhoe, 
who departed this life 22d Feb. 1835, 
aged 7 7 years and 4 months. 

Sacred to the Alemory of James Brice, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 28th of Oct. 1808, 
aged 43 years. 

This tribute of affection and esteem is paid 
in remembrance of his worth and of their loss, 
by an afflicted mother and sister, to whom 
he was endeared by his many virtues 
and amiable qualities. 

Major George Downie, 

died 4th December 1808, aged 47 years. 

A character every way creditable to 
human nature, if honest, if purity of principle, 
filial and fraternal affection, 
a conscious discharge of his public and private 
duties, if charity, and the practice of every virtue 
that enobles the character of a man, 
merit the kingdom of Heaven, 
the living only have to lament his premature 
death. 


To the Alemory of Air. Samuel Paterson, 
who departed this life the 4th day of Dec. 1808, 
aged 39 years, 3 months and 21 days. 

A very worthy man, and much regretted by all 
who knew him. 


94 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of George Evans, 
of the H. C. Pilot Service, 
who departed this life on the 
4th December, 1808, aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr J. B. Reeves, 
who departed this life April 15, 1809, 
aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs Sarah Celia Duncan, 
widow of the late Robert Duncan, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 17th of April 1809, 
aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Thomas Andrews, 
late Post Master of Diamond Harbour, 
who departed this life 3d July 1809. 
With Boreas blasts and stormy winds, 

I was tossed to and fro ; 

By God’s decree from danger free 
I’m harbour’d here below, 

Where at an anchor I do ride 
With numbers of the fleet, 

Until again I do set sail 
My admiral Christ to meet. 

As also one daughter 
and two sons of the above ; viz. 
Catharine, 

Obit. 16th Sept. 1804, Mt. 8 months. 

■William, 

Obit. 20th Oct. 1806, yEt. 6 days. 

I-2enry, 

Obit. 9th January 1809, yEt. 5 days. 


Elizabeth Emma Taylor, 

wife of James Taylor, Esq. 

Attorney to the Honorable East India Company, 
Calcutta, died the 31st July 1809, aged 35 years. 


In the Memory of matchless virtues of 
Mrs. Ann O’Brien, 

who died the 3d of August 1809, aged 44 years. 
This humble Monument is erected by her 
sorrowing children. 

With blissful extacy to realms of light, 

Her chaste, her spotless soul, has wing’d its flight, 
In rapt’rous strains her humble voice to raise, 

And chauut with seraph choirs her Maker’s praise. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Charles Eggleston, 
who died at Calcutta on the 10th of Sept. 1809, 
and in the fifty-seventh year of his age. 
Esteemed and respected, 
in an extensive circle, and much regretted 
as an honest man, a warm friend, 
a dutiful son, and an affectionate brother. 


To the Memory of 
M rs. Ann Ellerton, 

who departed this life October 7th, 1809, 
aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Denty, 
daughter of T. K. Fuller, Esq. 
Obit. 19th October 1809, JEt. 27 years. 


Mary Nicolson, 

wife of Mr. Simon Nicolson, 
Assistant Surgeon, Calcutta, 
died 17th November 1809, aged 30 years. 


MR. CHARLES WESTON, 

The son of the Recorder of the Mayor’s Court, was born in Calcutta in 1731, in a house then 
opposite to where the Tiretta Bazar now stands. He witnessed the great storm and inundation of 
1737, as it compelled his family to quit their house. The steeple of the Church he states to have 
fallen prostrate. The houses of the Europeans in Calcutta, at that time were surrounded with spacious 
gardens in which they stood central. This gentleman was the friend and associate of Mr. Hoi well, 
and carried arms as a militia-man at the Old Fort, in 1756. He was the founder of his own opulence ; 
surely fortune never bestowed wealth better than on Charles Weston, a striking and existing ex- 
ample, that chaste and refined sentiments are not confined to complexion or climate. This truly hono- 
rable man resided at Chinsurah, amid a group of necessitous people, soothed and supported by his 
bounty. Those who had seen better days and on whom fortune had ceased to smile, were comforted 
by Charles Weston. One hundred gold moliurs and upwards a month was regularly distributed to 
the indigent, from a box placed on his table ; nor was there any Sircar to deduct or intervene ; all 
came from his own venerable hand. He left a sum of about a lac of Rupees, the interest of 
which is still distributed monthly by the vestry of St. John's, to a large number of the poor of 
Calcutta and Chinsurah. 


The following Inscription is taken from his Monument : — 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Weston, 
who departed this life on the 25th Dec. 1809, 
in the 78th year of his age. 

A life protracted to an unusual length, 
he marked by an inostentatious life of 
benevolence and charity, 
seldom equalled, and never yet exceeded 
in British India. 

By the wise economical management of a fortune, 
far from enormous, 

(the product of his own industry, secured by the 
Divine blessing,) 

he was enabled to pour forth streams of 
bounty and mercy. 

He manifested a grateful mind, 
by cherishing in his old age his former 


employer and benefactor, 
the late Governor Holwell, 
and after living the friend of the destitute, 
the support of the widow and the fatherless, 
an ornament to the British name, 
and a blessing to mankind, 
he descended to the tomb amidst the 
tears of the indigent, 

and the lamentations of surviving friends. 
This stone is placed here 
as a tribute of united regard to the Memory of 
a tender and revered grandfather, 
by his affectionate and dutiful grandchildren. 
Reader ! 

This stone is nofatterer ! go, and do thou 
likewise. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


95 


To the Memory of Anna Sophia, 
second daughter of 
Leith Alexander and Mary Davidson, 
who died on the 21st Nov. 1809, 
aged 2 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Robert Ledlie, Esq. 
Barrister at Law, 

who died 24th November 1809, aged 65 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Patrick O’Brien, 

who departed this life 1st Jan. 1810, aged 21 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Frances Inglis, 
who departed this life January 4th, 1810, 
aged 24 years. 


To the Memory of Major George Benson, 
who died 7th January 1810, aged 54 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Patrick Moir, Esq. 

who died at Calcutta on the 15th February, 

A. D. 1810, in the 42d year of his age. 

In 1806 he filled the office of Secretary 
to Lord Minto, 

at that time Pesident of the Board of 
Commissioners for the affairs of India, 
whom he accompanied to Bengal in the year 1807, 
and was appointed a Commissioner of the 
Court of Request of Calcutta in the same year ; 

a trust which he discharged with integrity, 
assiduity and ability, to the time of his decease. 
His virtues, talents and accomplishments, 
all of the highest order, 

enhanced by a singular simplicity and modesty of 
character, had attracted in an eminent degree 
the esteem and regard of the world. 

His gentle and cheerful manners, 
his benevolent and warm affections, 
endeared him to numerous friends, 
whose tender but sorrowful recollections 
will long survive him. 

He lived respected and beloved, 
and died deservedly and universally deplored. 

Soft on thy tomb shall soft remembrance shed, 
The warm but unavailing tear ; 

And purple flowers that grace the virtuous dead, 
Shall strew the lov’d and honor’d bier. 


To the Memory of Capt. Samuel Gourlay, 
who died 19th January 1810, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Air. Patrick Connel, 

who departed this life 10th Feb. 1810, 
aged 50 years. 

Also his wife, Mrs. Margaret Connel, 
who departed this life 7th Sept. 1810, 
aged 50 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Lister, 

Many years senior Branch Pilot in the 
Honorable Company’s Marine of Calcutta, 
who departed this life on the 11th March 1810, 
aged 55 years. 

He was a man of great perseverance 
in his professional line, 

and always successful in it upwards of 27 years. 


In Memory of 
William Simpson, Esq. 
who died on the 12th of August MDCCXC. 
aged XXIX. years. 

Also to the Memory of 
George Augustus Simpson, Esq. 
who died on the 23d of March MDCCCXI. 
Aged XXXIV. 

To the Memory of Alexander Raitt, 
who departed this life the twelfth of May 1810, 
aged 61 years. 


In remembrance of an affectionate wife, 
the mother of four children, 

Mrs. Ann Riley, 

who’after a lingering and painful illness of 9 months 
which she bore with exemplary patience, 
departed this life on the 13th May 1810, 
resting her hopes of a joyful resurrection 
on the merit and mediation of her Redeemer ; 
aged twenty-one years and two months. 


Sacred to the Memory of a beloved child, 

Andrew Black, 

who departed this life on the 31st May 1810, 
aged 1 year, 11 months and 22 days. 

“ When Christ, who is my life shall appear, 
then shall I also appear with him in glory.” 


.Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Daniel Morrell, 
died 3rd June 1810, aged 17 months and 28 days. 


This stone is placed by 
G. T. Gibson, over the remains of 

Robert Knox, 

who died much and deservedly lamented, 
on the 6th day of June 1810, aged 20 years. 
Humane, generous and just. 


Sacred to the Memory of Marcar Arratoon, 
an Armenian Christian, 

who departed this life on the 6th of June 1810, 
aged 26 years and 4 months. 


To the Memory of the infant daughter of 

Charles Buller, 

born June 25th 1810, died June 27th, aged 2 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret, 
wife of G. T. Gibson, 
who at the early age of 1 7 years was taken 
from the bosom of an affectionate family, on the 
15th July 1810. Gentle, ingenious and good. 


To the Memory of John Conder, 
who died 19th July 1810, aged 40 years. 
Tins Monument was erected by his friend, 
Richard Watkins. 


90 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
blaster Jas. Tlios. Sherwood, 

who departed this life Aug. 7, 1810, aged 28 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Berrie Gordon Adams, 

son of Gordon and Jane Adams, 
who departed this life the 27th of August 1810, 
aged 4 years, 3 months and 9 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

George Saxon, 

born at Bartypoorah on the 13th Sept. 1796, 
and departed this life in Calcutta the 3rd Oct. 
1810, aged 24 years and 20 days. 

“ I am the resurrection and the life, saith the 
Lord ; he that believeth in me though he were 
dead yet shall he live ; And whosoever liveth and 
believeth in me shall never die.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Joseph Fletcher, 
who departed this life on the 22d of Sept. 1810, 
aged 44 years. 


Captain J. R. Mockler, of Cavalry, 
died the 3rd November 1810, aged 39 years. 


Here lies the body of Mrs Charlotte Scott, 
wife of Mr. Thomas Scott, 
Examiner, Police Department, 
who died 13th December 1810, aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eleanora Jones, 
Lady of Robert Jones, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 14th Dec. 1810, 
aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Master T. H. Baldwin* 
who died 15th December 1810, 
aged 7 years and 10 months. 

His father’s pleasure and his mother’s pride 
Belov’d he liv’d, much lamented died. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Frances Rollings, 
who departed this life on the 19th Dec. 1810, 
aged 23 years. 

A tender parent, and a sincere friend, 

Lov’d in her life, and lamented in her end. 


To the Memory of John Bell, 
who departed this life February 27th, 1803, 
aged 2 years and 8 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Ann Bell, 
who departed this life 

on the 30th of December 1810, aged 49 years. 
She was possessed of those virtues 
which adorn the sex, 

and whose loss will ever be lamented by an 
affectionate husband and family. 


To the Memory of "W. B. Birch, 
fifth officer of the ship “ Lady Lushington,” 
who departed this life January 8th 1811, 
aged 16 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catharine Greene, 

whose exemplary discharge of her several 
duties to her God, 
to her family, and to society, 
eminently entitled her to respect in the world ; 
and it is humbly and devoutly hoped, 
has secured to her eternal life and bliss, 

“ Where sickness, pain and sorrow cannot enter.” 
She died on the 20th January 1811, aged 32 years. 


Near this stone are deposited the remains of 
Anne Thomas Charter, 
who died Jan. 21st 1811, aged 8 months. 
By these lines her bereaved parents 
wish to perpetuate her Memory, 
which will be ever dear to them. 


To the Memory of 
Charlotte Maria Bruce, 

daughter of the Honourable Charles 
and Charlotte Bruce. Obit. 28th January 1811, 
JEtat 5 years, 3 months and 4 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sir Alexander Seton, Bart, 
who departed this life 4th February 1811, 
aged 38 years. 


In Memory of Anthony Dixon, 

third son of the Revd. Thos. Dixon, 

Late Rector of Yarum, Yorkshire, (England,) 
born 31st Nov. 1784, and died 2d April 1811 ; 
much lamented by his relations and friends. 


Helen Elizabeth, the infant daughter of 
C. G. Blagrave, Esq. died April the 18th, 1811, 
aged 9 months and 4 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. George Harry Hardy, 

who died the 8th of Jan. 1811, aged 26 years. 

“ I have heard a voice from heaven saying unto 
me, write, from henceforth blessed are the dead 
which die in the Lord ? Even so saith the Spirit, 
for they rest from their labours.” Rev. xiv : 13. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master James Edward Horsburgh, 

a beloved child, 

who was born the 29th September 1810, 
and died the 8th Sept. 1811. 


Sacred to the Memory of Harriet, 
the beloved child of W. W. West, 
and Harriet, his wife : 

Born 29th Nov. 1836, died 23d Feb. 1844. 


Sacred to the Memory of H. G. A. Howe, 
Deputy Commissary of Ordnance, 
who departed this life 2d October, 1811, 
aged 70 years. 

“Can stony’d urn, or animated bust, 

“ Back to its mansion call the fleeting breath? 

“ E an honor’s voice provoke the silent dust, 

“ Or flattery sooth the dull cold ear of death?” 


To the Memory of Captain Peregrine Sims 
late of the country service, who departed this’ 
life on the 8th of October 1811, aged 32 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


97 


To the Memory of 
Hugh H. Parkins, Esq., 
who died the 14th of November 1811, 
aged 43 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Ann, daughter of 
Alexander and Elizabeth Rogers, 
born 1 2th August 1794, died 6th Nov. 1811. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Henry ^Wilkins Hicks, 
11th Regt. N. I. 

Obit. 6th January 1812, aged 50 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Eliza Green, 
who departed this life the 7th January 1812, 
aged 37 years. 

This Monument is erected by her 
disconsolate husband, Capt. James Green, 
of the country service, 
as a tribute due to the best of women, 
a fond wife, and a tender mother. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major W. W. Kitchen, 
who departed this life on the 18th February 1812, 
aged 38 years. 

He has left a wife and three children 
ever to lament his loss. 


To the Memory of Henry Edward Graham, 
who died on the 19th of February 1812, 
aged 13 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Tabitha, 
wife of Quarter Master Robert Belcher, 
of H. M. 24th Regiment, 
who departed this life 20th March 1812, 
aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Ann Johnson, 
who departed this life on the 22d April 1812, 
aged 12 years, 8 ms. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert JSmillie, Cabinet maker, 
who departed this life on the 
third day of May 1812, aged 35 years. 

He was a dutiful husband and a good member 
of society ; his loss was severely felt by his 
disconsolate widow and a numerous circle 
of surviving friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Andrew Lister, 
eldest son of the late Mr. Robert Lister, 
many years senior Branch Pilot, 
of the Honorable Company’s Marine, Calcutta, 
who departed this life the 6th of May 1812, 
aged 16 years and 6 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

James Barton, Esq. 

of the H. C. Civil Service on this Establishment, 
who departed this life the 8th day of May 1812, 
aged 36 years and 6 months. 


Master Joseph Stansbury, 

died 9th May 1812, aged 8 months 14 days. 
Lord I an> grieved but I resign 
To thy superior will ; 

Tis grace, ’tis wisdom, all divina, 
Appoints the grief I feel. 


Here lies the remains of Sarah Ann Newton, 
Daughter of D. Newton, Esq. of Bombay, who 
died the 16th of May, 1812, aged 17 years. 

Erected to her Memory, by her sincere friends, 
Captain and Mrs. Jas. McCarthy. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Samuel Irwin, 

late Branch Pilot 

of the Honorable Company’s Marine, 
who departed this life on the 15th May, 1812, 
aged 40 years. 


In Memory of 

Two infant sons of Lieut. W. Nott. 
Henry Swinhoe, died 26th May 1812, 
aged 2 y^ars, 4 months, and 13 days. 

J ohn, 

died 7th September 1812, aged 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Hassin, 
late Head Constable at the Police, 
who departed this life, 
the 29th day of May 1812, aged 49 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. Colin Mackenzie, 
of H. M. 78th Regt., who departed this life, 
on the 7th of June 1812, aged 27 years. 
Deeply regretted by a numerous circle of friends, 
whom his amiable disposition had acquired. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Haynes, 
who departed this life, 
the 11th of June 1812, aged 58 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Jane Ross, 
who departed this life on the 29th August 1812, 
aged 36 years, 7 months and 15 days. 

On whom were united in an eminent degree all 
the virtues of a pious wife, 
a tender and affectionate mother. 

She has left a disconsolate husband, and three 
children to lament her loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Anne Cooper, 

who departed this life on the 31st August 1812, 
aged 18 years, 9 months and 24 days. 

Secred to the Memory of Mr. John Cooper, 
who departed this life 19th September 1821, 
aged 62 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catharina Louisa Larkins, 
who died at Calcutta on the 21st of September 
1812, in the 32nd year of her age. 

In the several relations of daughter, wife and 
mother, the conduct of the deceased during the 
short period of her appointed existence on earth, 
was uniformly meritorious, 
for the early loss of worth thus various. A loss, 
embittered by the precious decease 
of a beloved infant, whose remains 
are adjacently interred. 

Language can but unadequately express 
the grief of the afflicted husband, 
who inscribes this stone, J. F, Larkins. 




o 


n 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. John Iiish, 

who departed this life on the 13th October 1812, 
aged 51 years. 

This Epitaph is inscribed 
by his affectionate wife Elizabeth Lish. 


In the Memory of 
Lieut. Joseph Ferris, 

of H. M. 24th Regiment of Foot, 
second son of Joseph Ferris, Esq. 
of Truro, in Cornwall ; 

who died the 14th October 1812, aged 28 years. 
This stone is erected by his brother officers 
in testimony of his merit and their esteem. 

The infant daughter of Capt. Charles Court, 
born on the 30th and died on the 31st Oct. 1812. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Mason, 
late Purser of the Honorable Company’s 
ship “ Baring,” 

who departed this life 24th Nov. 1812, 
aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Eliza Smith, 
Wife of John Furgusson Smith, Esq. 
who departed this life 3rd January 1813, 
aged 17 years and 5 months. 
Affection’s last sad tribute. 


Sacred lies interred here the infant son of 
Robert and Charlotte Allan, 
born 27th, and died 29tli January, A. D. 1813. 


Quis desiderio sit pudorant modus 
Tam chari capitis. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant Charles Soott Waring, 
Adjutant to the Body Guard of 
The Right Honorable the Governor General, 
Obit. 2d Feb. 1813, /Etat. 2G. 

His cheerful disposition, conciliatory manners, 
and unaffected simplicity of character ; 
endeared him to his relatives and friends, 
and acquired him the regard of all who knew him. 
While his conduct in his profession, 
obtained him the public applause, 
and private regard of his noble patron ; 
who represented him where most he 
was emulous of being known, 
as a youth of the first promise. 

Past are those hopes, closed are those views 
which promised to realize his moderate desires ; 
and which opening bright prospects to his 
relatives and friends ; now spread a deeper 
gloom over his sad loss. 


, Sacred to the Memory of laewis Grant, 
who departed this life on the 3rd day of March 
A. D. 1813, aged 38 years. 

His early death involves in grief severe, 

A loving partner and five infants dear. 

The former while she mourns her widow’d fate, 
Beholds the latter and laments their state. 

Too soon, Alas ! depriv’d of their best guide 
They’re left to traverse life’s inconstant tide. 
But tho’ with perils their conditions fraught, 
To rest on God their little hearts are taught, 
And deeply as their loss they do deplore 
They trust for safety in His mercies store. 


Here lies the body of 
James Arden Gordon, 

born the 27th of October A. D. 1811, 
died the 27th of January 1813, aged 15 months. 
Of such are the kingdom of Heaven. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Richard W p elsh, 
1st Officer of the country ship Eliza. Obit. 31st 
March 1813, zEtat. 23 years. 

The death of this young man was occasioned 
by a fatal explosion of three barrels of gunpow- 
der, near Mayapore, on Friday the 19th March 
1813. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. George Silverlock, 
2d Officer of the country ship Eliza, Obit, the 
26th March 1813, JE t. 16 years. 

This unfortunate youth was in Company with 
Mr. Welsh, the time of the explosion ; whose re- 
mains are interred by his side. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Robert Atkins, 
late Branch Pilot of the H. C. M. who departed 
this life April the 13th 1813, aged 51 years. 
And also six of his infant children that lays near 
this spot. Afflictions sore long time he bore, 
Physicians strove in vain, God did please that 
death should come and ease him of his pain. 

Sacred to the Memory of Ann, wife of R. Pauling, 
who left this for a better world the 23d April 
1813, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Anne, 
wife of Captain Charles Court, Mar. Surveyor 
General ; and eldest daughter of George Sowley 
Holroyd, Esq. Barrister of Gray’s Inn, who 
departed this life on the 14th of May, A. D. 1813, 
aged 24 years. 

If worth were to be esteemed by the unspeakable 
grief of a disconsolate husband, and the deep 
and unfeigned grief of all who had the happiness 
of her acquaintance, her’s w T ould rank high 
indeed ; but Alas ! she has fled from erring human 
judgment to that tribunal which alone can 
duly appreciate the mild and gentle virtues 
which adorned her amiable mind. 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane Catharine, 
the infant daughter of Lieut. Edward Browne, 
13th N. I. who died on the 20th May 1813, 
aged 11 months. 


To the Memory of Catharine Ann Simpson, 

born 15th December 1812, and departed this 
life on the 20th June 1813. 


To the Memory of Charles, the son of 
Thomas and Ann Gillanders, who died the 21st. 
June 1813, aged 4 years, 2 months, and 17 days. 

In Memory of Mrs. Ann Creighton, 

who died the 3d of July 1813, aged 43 years. 
This is inscribed by her sons Thomas, Edward, 
William Douglas and James Normau Creighton 
in gratitude to the best of mothers. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Jessup, 
who departed this life on the 25th of August 
1813, aged 68 years. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth May, 

daughter of Mr. T. H. Metcalfe, Obit. 7th Sep- 
tember 1813, Jit. 4 years, 1 month and 18 days. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to tlie Memory of Mary Gouldhawke, 
who departed this transitory life and “ shuffled 
off this mortal coil,” on the 30th day of October 
1813, in the fullest hopes, thro’ the merits of 
her blessed Redeemer, to enter into the mansion of 
everlasting bliss ; aged 49 years. 

Leaving her disconsolate husband and also her 
son to bewail her loss. 

All is vanity. 

What tho’ we now lament and mourn 
Her mortal frame shall ne’er return 
That’s gone alas ! for evermore, 

Let then our consolation be 
To meet her in eternity, 

“ She is not lost, but gone before,” 

Let us, my son, in God put all our trust, 

And know that in His sight all flesh is dust. 


This last and sorrowful tribute marks the grave of 
Mrs. Margaret Kinsey, 
who, if thou knowest her, best can judge 
Resigned her spirit to God on Dec. the 6th, 1813, 
aged 21 years and 10 months. 

To the Memory of Henry Rashleigh, Esq. 
late second officer of the H. C.’s ship Tottenham ; 
who departed this life at Calcutta, Dec. 18th, 1813, 
aged 24 years, and seven months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Angus McLean, 
who departed this life on the 30th Dec. 1813, 
aged 49 years, 3 months, and 2 days. 

And his infant daughter Jane, who died on the 
25th April 1812, aged 3 years and 5 months. 
Long time with sickness he lay sore opprest 
Kind death has eas’d him, he lies here at rest. 


Sacred to the Memory of Marian D’Oyly, 
the wife of Charles D’Oyly 
of the H. C. Civil Service. 

In life she was equally distinguished for the 
elegance and mildness of her manners ; the 
extensive endowments of her mind and, the 
affectionate benevolence of her heart. 
Adorned with every virtue and accomplishment 
that can dignify our nature, she was suddenly 
snatch’d from this transitory world beloved by all 
who knew her, on the 9th day of January A. D. 
1814, in the 35th year of her age. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Davies, 
died 11th Jan. 1814, aged 2 years and 10 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Herbert Colebrookc, 

died 17th Feb. 1814, aged 1 year and 9 months. 


Interred Mary Adams, daughter ol 
James Cousins, Esq. Penang Civil Service ; 
died the 25th March 1814, aged 1 year, 1 1 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Henry Lyons Percival, 
who departed this life on the 21st April 1814, 
aged 3 months and 20 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of i\l rs. B. A. F. C. Smith, 
wife of Lieut. Smith, H. M. 24 Infantry ; 
who departed this life the 5th June 1814, 
aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Ensn. Duffy Swinton, 
who died the 8th of August 1814, aged 23 years. 


To the Memory of Lieut. Joseph Greene, 
25th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry. Nephew 
of Major Anthony Greene ; who died the 21st 
August 1814, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Master John Trist, 
born 14th Sept. 1811, died 24th Oct. 1814. 


James Smyth, Esq. aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Hannah Williams, 

Aged 30 years. Sincerely regretted by all 
her friends. 


In Memory of Thomas Munsaw, 

a faithful servant and an honest man. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
David lATedderburn Mackenzie, 

Cornet in his Majesty’s 8th Light Dragoons, son 
of John and Elizabeth Mackenzie ; who departed 
this life on the 29th Dec. 1814, aged 21 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of George Morison Esq. 
who died the 19th Jan. 1815, aged 36 years. 


LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ROBERT KYD — ( Late Military Secretary to the Government 

of Bengal.) 

A character distinguished for Botanical researches, to whom India, and the neighbourhood of 
Calcutta, in particular, is indebted for many valuable and curious plants. To the Memory of this gen- 
tleman a beautiful Marble Urn, sculptured by Mr. Banks, has been erected in the centre of the 
Honorable Company’s Botanical Garden. His remains lie interred in the old burial ground, under an 
oblong square of masonry level with the ground, to the right after you enter into the gate. He died 
on the 27th May 1793. 


DR JOHN ADAM. 

John Adam was of a good family in Forfarshire, North Britain. He was born at Forfar, in 
January 1792, and was the eldest son of a respectable Surgeon, who had served in the medical staff of 
the British army, both at home and abroad, and afterwards settled in private practice at Forfar. He 
received the early part of his education at a private school in his native town, as well as at the Grammar 
school of Dundee, and in the year 1807, at the age of fourteen he became a student at Mareschol College, 
Aberdeen. There he resided two terms under the special charge of his relative, Bishop Skinner, an ac- 
complished scholar, who directed his young friend’s studies chiefly to the higher classics, and the 
elementary portions of Chemistry and Natural History, branches of knowledge for which he entertained 
a strong predilection. 

Dr. Adam appears to have experienced an intuitive and strong attraction towards a particular calling, 
and the history of Iris career proves that he made a proper and a wise choice. 

o 2 


100 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND 


Brought up in his father’s house, and accustomed from childhood to the details of a Dispensary, he 
acquired in prescription and in surgical, no less than pharmaceutical manipulation, a precocious facility 
which was quite remarkable. 

During his second recess of the college, when sixteen years old, he was in medical charge of a regi- 
ment of local Militia, where he displayed such taste and sagacity that he never found it requisite to 
consult anybody. 

in the autumn of the same year, 1809, he proceeded to Edinburgh, where he matriculated for the 
first time in November. The chairs of the University during the terms of his studies there, were filled 
by Professors eminently distinguished in the annals of general and medical science. 

In 1812, he passed Surgeon’s Hall, and soon after passed examination before the Army Medical 
Board in London, and was gazetted as an Hospital Assistant to the forces, in June of the same year ; 
his views being directed towards active service in the Peninsula, circumstances however occurred which in- 
duced him to abandon all idea of the army. He accordingly resigned his commission, became a member 
of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, and in the beginning of November, proceeded to Edinburgh 
for the purpose of further prosecuting his studies, with the view of taking his degree in Physic. 

In May 1814, he returned for the last time to the University of Edinburgh, and passed his examina- 
tions as a candidate for the summi honores medicinse with great credit. He ere long discovered, how- 
ever, that the sphere of a country practitioner did not harmonize with his ambition. Accordingly he final- 
ly left Scotland in 1816, for London. During his residence in the capital, he renewed his study of Natur- 
al History, and was a constant visiter at the British Museum. 

In 1817, he received the appointment of Assistant Surgeon in the Bengal Presidency, and proceeded 
to India the same year. On his arrival in July, after the customary routine of attendance at the 
General Hospital, he proceeded up the country attached to the Military branch of the Medical Service. 
In all situations he served with uniform credit to himself, receiving the cordial approbation of his su- 
periors. — In the course of the Military part of his service, he had good opportunities of witnessing the 
diseases of the camp, and the details of medical duty w r ith native and European troops. The experi- 
ence and information that he thus acquired must have afterwards proved of great use to him when 
Secretary to the Medical Board. 

Dr. Adam’s views now became directed to the Presidency. In 1820, through the kind office of the 
Governor General Adam, his wishes were accomplished by his being appointed one of the permanent 
Assistant Surgeons at the General Hospital. In 1824, he exchanged appointments with a friend, who 
took his place at the General Hospital, and he became Assistant Marine Surgeon a situation which has 
nothing to recommend it, but the position in which it places the Medical Officer, with reference to pri- 
vate practice, in which Dr. Adam was now becoming extensively engaged. 

An object which he had long at heart was the formation of a Society in which medical men could 
unfold their views and the result of their mutual experience. Dr. Adam finding that there were a few me- 
dical friends at the Presidency who fully concurred with him as to the great utility of such an institution, a 
communication was opened on the subject with the late Dr. Jas. Hare. On Dr. Adam, as the Secretary, by 
far the most onerous share of labour fell, but it was to him “ a labour of love.” In 1825, he was selected 
by Lord Amherst to fill the important and responsible situation of Secretary to the Medical Board. 

In all the above respectable grades of Medical Service of the East India Company, he performed his 
various duties with credit to himself and honor to his profession. While at the General Hospital, he always 
made it a point to show the kindest attention to young Medical Officers joining the service. His house w r as 
ever open to those of his brethren arriving from time to time at the Presidency, who most required such 
friendly attention. In his demeanor towards the sick, no matter how lowly was their state, there was 
an unaffected solicitude and quiet benevolence of manner, that won their confidence and affection. 

Respecting his private character. The warmth of his heart, the agreeableness of his manners, and 
the playfulness of his humour, together with the gentle frankness and the honesty of his nature, 
endeared him to his friends. Whatever secret cares might be weighing on his mind, the cheerfulness 
and serenity, which are such winning features of character, and give such zest to neighbourly and social 
communion, never forsook him. He was therefore uniformly the same amiable and animated being, the 
same kindly-disposed and delightful companion. 

It only now remains to notice with becoming briefness, the melancholy circumstances of his last 
illness and death. Towards the end of the first week in July 1830, Dr. Adam, whose health had been 
in an unsatisfactory state for some time previous, was seized with ardent fever, which continued without 
remission or much abatement till the 26th of the month, when hoematemesis and dysenteric purging 
supervened, which in three days put a period to his valuable life. Fully sensible of his danger, yet not 
despairing of recovery, he settled all his worldly affairs within the first three or four days of his ill- 
ness, and then with tranquil resignation awaited the issue. During the last week of his illness, he 
expressed a desire to converse on spiritual subjects with the Rev. Principal Mills of Bishop’s College. 
That gentleman made all the haste in his power to see his sick friend, but his house being at a consi- 
derable distance from Calcutta some delay necessarily ensued, and when he arrived it was too late. 
That intellect which was once so clear and unclouded was now dimmed by the mist of approaching 
dissolution, and on the morning of the 29th July, he ceased to live. 

The Monument erected over his grave, bears the following inscription : — 

To the Memory of John Adam, Esq. M. D. 

Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, London, Surgeon in the Service of the Id. E. I. Company, 

and Secretary to the Medical Board, Bengal. 

This Momument is erected by the Members of the Medical and Physical Society of Calcutta, 
as a mark of their esteem for his public and private w r orth and their sense of his service 
as Associate and Secretary from the formation of the Society (in which he was mainly instrumental) 
to the period of his premature and lamented decease. Born at Forfar, A. D, 1792, 
died in Calcutta Julv 29th 1830. in the 38th vear of his age. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


101 


THE LATE MR. BRANCH PILOT SINCLAIR. 

Mr. Patrick George Sinclair entered the Pilot service in the year 1798, at a time when it was 
recruited by any casual means, instead of, as it is now, being composed of men of respectable family 
and of good education selected by the Court of Directors. Mr. Sinclair therefore, in the course of his 
service, had witnessed an organic change in the body to which he belonged ; a change which has work- 
ed as great a difference in the character, deportment, and value of the service, as it is well possible to 
conceive. From being as a body, subject, but too justly, to reproach, the Pilots of the Port may 
now challenge any body of men for general worth, integrity and character. 

Mr. Sinclair has had the merit of passing through both these stages, not only without reproach, but 
with the highest character and credit in every respect. Under the old, as under the new regime, he 
was ever distinguished by a steadiness, zeal, ability and honesty of purpose that would have done 
honour, to any individual in any situation of life. 

Under the late change in the constitution of the Service, he had secured and retained to the last, the 
respect and esteem of all its younger members, as well of those nearer his own standing, while he had 
always enjoyed the unabated confidence and regard of all his superiors. In the rank of Senior Branch 
Pilot, employed in the general aid of the duties of the department, as connected with the Pilotage of the 
River, he has been unwearied in his exertions, and his death may be attributed to them. He left 
Calcutta in perfect health, and with every prospect of long continuing to add to his claims in the 
department by the exercise of his useful talents, on the 8th September 1836, for the purpose of 
cursorily examining Channel Creek, in connection with the projected Harbour and Railroad from that 
place. On the 9th he was attacked with fever and ague, but proceeded down the river ; he was, however, 
obliged to return to town, where he arrived on the morning of the 14th, and landed free from fever. 
In the course of the day it returned, and finally caused his death at half past eleven jp. m. on the 15th. 

One of the last acts of his long and useful public career was that of saving the lives of the crew 
and passengers of the late ship Windsor. He was about that time employed in the Eastern Channel in 
laying a Buoy, and so arranged his movements, that he might be up in the Gasper Channel, when that 
ill-fated ship would be passing through in order that he might, if necessary, render her assistance. 
That act was his own, and the result showed how well-judged and considerate was his determination ; 
without it, every individual on board the ship would in all probability have perished. He was in com- 
mand, mild, yet firm in his conduct to those placed under his orders, while to those above him he was 
uniformly respectful and obedient. 

His death will long be felt as a public loss in the department in which for 38 years he had served 
with honor and credit to himself and with great advantage to the public service. 

( The following inscription is on his tomb : — ) 

Sacred to the Memory of Patrick George Sinclair, Esq. 

Senior Branch Pilot H. C. B. M. who departed this life on the 15th September 1836, 

aged 53 years and 22 days. 

Mr. S. was much esteemed by his superiors, for his long and faithful services of 38 years, and univer- 
sally respected by those who served under him. He united in his person all that could command 
regard and excite admiration. A mind more generous, a heart more pure and a disposition more amiable 
than his could not exist — added to these qualities he was a most affectionate father, a kind husband, 

and a sincere and warm friend. 

“ Weep not for me, lament no more, 

I am not lost but gone before.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Jane, 

eldest daughter of Patrick George and Elizabeth Sinclair, who departed this life on the 2d Feb. 1829, 

aged 11 years, 4 months 8 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord.” — Job. 1 21. 

“ And all wept and bewailed her, but he said weep not, she is not dead but sleepeth.” — Luke viii. 52. 


MR. W. F. CLARK. 

Mr. William Fairlie Clark came to India in the Hon’ble Company’s Bengal Civil Service, and 
afterwards joined the firm of Fergusson and Co., and continued a partner many years until the time of 
its failure. 

Mr. Clark was a gentleman of retired, and of a most amiable character, highly esteemed by the 
mercantile community. 

(The following inscription is on his tomb : — ) 

Sacred to the Memory of 'William Fairlie Clark, Esq. 
who died in Calcutta September the 23rd 1835, aged 47 years, 5 months and 25 days. 


JOHN ROSS HUTCHINSON, ESQ. — ( Late of the Bengal Civil Service.) 

Mr. Hutchinson was born at Stonehaven, North Britain, on the 29th June 1792, and very early 
in life had the misfortune to lose his father ; he followed the usual elementary course observed in Scottish 
Schools, while his moral and religious education was under the vigilant superintendance of an excellent 
mother,, whom his own fond pen has recorded, as the kindest, gentlest, tenderest parent, that ever lived. 
In 1806 he was sent to school at Aberdeen, where, after remaining some time, he received intimation 


102 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


of his having, through the exertions of his maternal uncle, been appointed to a Bengal Writership. A 
provision of this kind is, to the friends of the party, truly an anxious blessing. It satisfies the present 
corroding anxiety for the son, or the brother, and takes off the edge of the passing exigency, but it has 
no talismanic charm to avert the painful solicitude of the future or to lesson the weight of the doubts 
and misgivings of separation that may be for all time. 

Leaving the College of Hertford in May 1810, the subject of this memoir sailed for India in the 
following month. He arrived in Calcutta in December, 1810. Mr. Hutchinson intently applied himself 
to the cultivation of the oriental languages, and with such effect, that in about seven months he passed 
his examination at Fort William ; and was appointed immediately afterwards to Allighur, whence he 
was directed to proceed to Mirzapore, as Register of that station. In the course of 1815, though a very 
young man, he was nominated to officiate as Judge and Magistrate of Mirzapore, and during the period 
of his incumbency, the rajah of Burdee, having made a hostile incursion into the district, Mr. Hutchin- 
son accompanied the detachment of troops sent to quell the movement, and after considerable difficnlties, 
succeeded in concluding a treaty with the Rajah, which was highly approved of by Lord Hastings, of 
which a very handsome acknowledgment was conveyed to the young functionary, through the medium 
of the late Mr. Adam, then Secretary to Government. He soon acquired the confidence of the 
natives, in illustration of which it is sufficient to observe that when the Governor General (Lord H.) 
went up the country, and after Mr. Hutchinson had left the station to take a voyage to sea, on account 
of his health, the inhabitants of Mirzapore presented a memorial to his Lordship praying that he might 
be confirmed permanently in the appointment. 

In 1816 Mr. Hutchinson was compelled by ill health to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope, during 
his sojourn at which place he took that important step in life upon which, at the same time that it 
extends the basis of a man’s responsibilities, the scheme of his purest and most rational enjoyment 
mainly depends. He was singularly fortunate in the object of his choice ; his lady, with whom he had 
spent twenty years of uninterrupted happiness and a family of ten children, survives to deplore the loss 
of a devotedly attached husband, and an exemplary and affectionate father. It would be inconsistent 
with the object of an unpretending sketch like this, to follow the subject of it through the details of 
every situation he held in the public service. Suffice it that in 1821, the writer found him under his 
own hospitable roof, while Judge and Magistrate of Burdwan, at the head of a happy and charming 
family, beloved and respected as a member of society, and well known and appreciated as a zealous 
and able functionary on whose discretion and experience great reliance might be placed. He remained 
at Burdwan for the following five years, engaged in his official pursuits, and acquiring for himself that 
personal consideration and weight, which a masculine understanding, conjoined with prudence and 
undeviating rectitude, never fail, in due course, to secure for their possessor. In 1829, Mr. Hutchin- 
son was appointed Judge of Goruckpore, which station he joined in April, but a few months afterwards 
was nominated to officiate as Commissioner of Benares, in which appointment, after serving for some 
months, he returned to Goruckpore. In 1838 his name appeared in orders as Commissioner for Meerut; 
where he remained till the end of 1836, when he was gazetted to act as a Judge of Sudder Dewanny 
Adawlut. From the above simple reference to the situations which he successively held it is sufficiently 
obvious that the value of his services was justly appreciated by the Government ; nor is it assuming 
more than is warranted by prescription and experience to suppose, that had it pleased heaven to prolong 
his days, he would have obtained still higher office and rank. He had early formed to himself cool and 
active habits of business. Accordingly, as a public officer he became remarkable for the despatch and 
methodical regularity with which he got through his official labours. His thorough knowledge of the 
subject, combined with these, gave him a facility in the performance of his duties, that soon made his 
merits known as an enlightened and energetic magistrate. His temperament, no less than the structure 
of his mind and his acquirements, admirably qualified him for a still more advanced sphere than the 
Magistrates and the Zillah Judges, but whei'e, alas ! it was not doomed that he should long remain. 
Placid, patient, firm, no counteraction put him out, no complexity wearied him ; no subtlety or sophistry 
warped his judgment. To a thorough knowledge of the oriental languages, he added an intimate 
acquaintance with the customs and prejudices of the natives, no less than a generous consideration for 
their weakness and moral defects. Mr. Hutchinson was of middle height and slender make with a 
countenance expressive of great intelligence, inclined to a benign gravity. In disposition he was 
cheerful and cordial, with a deal of quiet humour which gave an attraction to his conversation, when he 
was on intimate terms with the party. His heart was susceptible of the warmest attachments ; and 
though he had many friends, it does not appear that he ever lost one. He was imbued with a love of our 
great national poets, and often derived solace from them, and also from a taste for drawing, in which, 
with more leisure, he might have excelled. He was a pious man, and his actions were moulded 
habitually by the unostentatious, but deeply seated, and life-giving religion of the heart. It were almost 
superfluous after this to add, that he was a most kind and benevolent master, considering his servants 
as a part of his family, and taking a lively interest in the promotion of their welfare. That most 
heavy evil, separation from wife and children, peculiar to life in India, and part of the penalty which 
must be paid for a pilgrimage here in pursuit of a competency, preyed latterly upon his spirits, more, u 
it is probable, than he chose to avow. A prolonged residence in the climate had undoubtedly affected 
his constitution more seriously than might, to the superficial observer, be obvious, although no intimate 
friend could help perceiving that he began to look pale and thinner than was consistent with his 
average health, a state of things to which the last exhausting hot season, no doubt greatly added. 

The loss of such a man to the public service, is not easily replaced, but to his family and friends is 
irreparable. 

Happy is the death of the righteous man ! The subject of our sketch was taken ill with the disorder, 
from which he never recovered, on the 2d of September last. He required no intimation of his approach- 
ing end, for he had all along a presentiment of it. He needed no hints about setting his house in 
order ; for that had been well looked to. The deep-rooted and practical piety of his life had fortified 




SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


103 


him too habitually to be disengaged at the approach of the mortal consummation, and at peace with 
i himself and all on earth, and full of confidence in the mediation of the Saviour, and with a cheerful 
resignation to the summons of his Creator, he departed this life on Sunday the lfith ot September, 
between nine and ten o’clock at night. 

The following inscription is erected to his memory in the South Park Street Burial Ground : — 

Sacred to the Memory of 

John Ross Hutchinson, Esq. 

of the Bengal Civil Service ; one of the J udges of the Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut 
Adawlut of Bengal, a man who in his life was endowed with a powerful and 
correct judgment ; a stedfast faith in religion and the loftiest principles of integrity. With these 
were happily united a refined taste and a most amiable and affectionate disposition. 

He has left a beloved wife and ten children, besides an extensive circle of 
attached friends to deplore his untimely loss. 

Born at Stonehaven, N. B. June 29th, 1792 ; died at Calcutta 16th September 1838. 

Requiescat in pace. 


MR. H. L. Y. DEROZIO. 

Henry Louis Vivian Derozio was born in Calcutta, the 10th of April 1809, and was sent to 
-school at the age of six years. His quickness and his progress, soon attracted the attention of his 
master, Mr. David Drummond. Derozio was much beloved at school, both by his teachers and his school 
fellows. He commenced his dallyings with the Poetic muse at a very early age. On the occasion ot a 
Theatre being established at the school by the boys attached to it, he wrote the prologue, and it is a 
very rare production, considering the extreme youth of the writer, and the circumstances of his educa- 
tion. Literature was his sole delight, and in it, he most assuredly excelled. The Roman classics and 
the Mathematics never were his favorite pursuits. He had a smattering of both these studies, but he 
was not certainly an adept in either of them. Moral Philosophy was his favorite study, next however 
to Poetry. He left school at the age of fourteen, and immediately entered into business. He served 
for a short time in the Agency House of Messrs. J. Scott and Company, where his father occupied a 
i respectable post. But the Cash-book and the Ledger had no charms for him. He resigned this office, 
and placed himself under his Uncle, Mr. Johnson, Indigo Planter, at Bhaugulpore. He found this 
business more congenial to his temper and his disposition. Country scenes, and mountains and rivers, 
inspired his fancy, kindled his imagination, and awakened poetical feelings in his soul. 

Hitherto Derozio had scribbled verses, but he had never submitted them for publication. It was at 
this time that he courted public favor under the signature of “ Juvenis” in the columns of the India 
Gazette, then conducted by Dr. John Grant. The generous Editor fostered literary worth, and 
Derozio flattered and encouraged, poured forth his effusions with singular rapidity. These produc- 
tions are not characterized by any great poetical feeling or fancy. There is a glitter of Oriental images 
and a variety of “ smart conceits” in them. They bear testimony to the existence of the poetical 
feeling, but nothing more. They are, to use his own words, “ lines written on the sand,” — which the 
swelling tide of his future fame, would have completely washed away, and left in their stead, “ costly 
. gems and pearls of the ocean,” but it has happened otherwise. The writing is left, and we must be 
content with the evidence it bears to the excellency of the hand that wrote it. It has been said, that 
Derozio might have strung the harp of India to worthier strains than it has emitted, if he were not 
spoiled by flattery, and that the sugar-plums of friends, and a host of admirers, Europeans and East In- 
dians, had entirely vitiated his taste and deteriorated the products of his Muse. It was the fate of poor 
Derozio to be as much bespattered with abuse, and exposed to envy, as he is said to have been court- 
ed and flattered. In the season of his full blown reputation he was one evening going up the steps of a 
house, to which he had been invited by the lady, who was for a long while the distinguished ornament 
of this society, when he heard voices, and he immediately recognized the tones of the gentleman of 
the house, and a poetical friend. He was announced, and these words reached his ear ; “ as for Derozio, 
I allow he possesses fancy, but my Khansamah possesses more judgment than he.” Derozio turned 
back, and never did he again visit that house. 

The great fault with Derozio, was that he was too soon left his own master in the delightful fields of 
literature. He possessed no mentor, whose superior judgment and matured understanding would have 
informed his intellect, and from the fire of his mind the slender taper of his understanding would have 
borrowed light and life. Derozio gave up his soul to the writings of Moore and Byron, and L. E. L. 
The glittering fancies of the first, like diamonds that sparkle on the person of an Indian king, which 
instead of lighting up the beauty of the countenance by their lustre dazzle the eye and destroy the effect 
of the natural appearance : — the fervent and passionate outpourings of the heart of the second, that 
remind his reader of the arch-fiend, Satan, impiously obstinate and dreadful in his revolves, at one time 
uttering horrid imprecations, at another time, breathing the tenderest emotions of wounded feeling and 
a subdued soul and the tawdry ornament of the last, like her own Ethel churchill, the heroine of a 
tale, and the poorest personage of the whole drama, brooding over her own disappointment, and con- 
veying her wrongs in language not always intelligible : — these were the writers, the pedestals of whose 
fame are the Irish Melodies, Childe Harold, and the Venetian Bracelet, that had pre-occupied his soul, 
and to the bewitching influence of whose writings, he was most irresistibly bound. How much better 
for him, had his attention been directed to the volumes of Shakespear and Milton. The delineations of 
human character and passion of the one, and the sober and classic muse of the other, would have con- 
strained him to reflect before he sat down to write his thoughts. This check would have been of great 
advantage to the fame and character of his writings. Notwithstanding this objection, his productions 
are remarkable with advertence to the extreme youth of the writer, and the education he had received. 

r V? CqUa ’ ,ntance man was not extensive, and his knowledge of nature was gathered from the nlains 
of Bhaugulpore and the Rock of Jungheera. 1 



104 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


The unexpected encouragement which Derozio received from the Editor of the India Gazette, in- 
duced him to venture on the publication of his poems. Accordingly he came down to Calcutta from 
Bhaugulpore, in 1826, and hurried his first volume through the press. The reception it met with 
was most flattering and encouraging. In the following year, he not only reprinted his former volume, 
but added another ambitious poem entitled “ the Faiceer of Jungheera.” The plot of this poem is 
extremely threadbare, and the merit of the poet is therefore the greater, inasmuch as he has been able 
to weave so much interest around the hero and fair heroine of the poem. The two volumes were re- 
ceived by the public with great approbation, and Derozio’s fame was supposed by many to be firmly 
established. 

At this time, Derozio obtained an appointment in the Hindu College, as teacher, through the kind 
Assistance of Dr. John Grant, to whom he had dedicated the first volume of his poems. Well might 
it be said of Dr. Grant, that he rocked the cradle of Derozio’s genius and followed its hearse. He 
told the youthful poet, when solicited for permission to inscribe the first volume to him, that he would 
advise the dedication to be made to some more influential person, who could promote his welfare in 
life. But Derozio’s grateful heart would not permit him to adopt this counsel. 

His career as a teacher was marked with great success. He opened the eyes of his pupils’ under- 
standings. He taught them to reason, and imbued their minds with a taste for poetry and literature. 
His knowledge of moral Philosophy, was somewhat extensive. With great penetration, he led his scholars 
through the pages of Locke, Reid and Stewart. We do not know whether we can offer a higher 
testimony to Derozio’s Metaphysical acquirements, than the opinion of the Rev. Dr. Mill, late Principal 
of Bishop’s College. He avowed before a large and respectable Meeting, that the objections which 
Derozio published to the Philosophy of Rant, were perfectly original and displayed powers of reason- 
ing and observation which would not disgrace even gifted Philosophers. Derozio laboured with great 
zeal for his pupil’s interests. He established the first Debating Society among the students of the Hindu 
College, ancl delivered a course of Lectures on English Poetry. He was neither a fluent nor an elo- 
quent speaker, but the little that he said, contained bone and sinew, and furnished a large stock of ac- 
curate information. 

Many reasons have been urged in explanation of Derozio’s dismissal from the College. The subjoined 
letter throws no light some the mystery. 

We pretend to know a little more of the business than most of our contemporaries, and we will now 
proceed to detail it. The questions which Derozio has answered in the following letter, and w T hich 
were adduced as charges against him, do not state the whole truth. These charges grew’ out of the 
principal reason, which has hitherto been hidden from the view of all. They were the offspring of un- 
founded calumny. The Native managers of the Hindu College, were alarmed at the progress which 
some of the pupils were making under Derozio, by actually cutting their way through ham and beef, 
and wading to Liberalism through tumblers of beer. From this new feature of Hindu education, the 
praise or blame of which must rest on the memory of Derozio, the managers dreaded the worst conse- 
quences. To put a stop to further insight into the science of Gastronomy, Derozio was dismissed in 
1831. This is the plain unvarnished story ! 

To H. H. Wilson, Esq. 

My Dear Sir, — Your letter which l received last evening, should have been answ’ered earlier, but 
for the interference of other matters which required my attention. I beg your acceptance of this apology 
for the delay, and thank you for the interest which your most excellent communication proves that you 
continue to take in me. I am sory however, that the questions you have put to me will impose upon you 
the disagreeable necessity of reading this long justification of my conduct and opinions. But I must 
congratutate myself that this opportunity is afforded me of addressing so influential and distinguished 
an individual as yourself, upon matters which, if true, might seriously affect my character. My friends 
need not, however, be under any apprehension for me ; for myself, the consciousness of right is my 
safeguard and my consolation. 

1st. I have never denied the existence of a God in the hearing of any human being. If it be wrong 
to speak at all upon such a subject, I am guilty, for I am neither afraid nor ashamed to confess having 
stated the doubts of Philosophers upon this head, because I have also stated the solution of those doubts. 
Is it forbidden any where to argue upon such a question ? If so, it must be equally wrong to adduce 
an argument upon either side : or is it consistent with an enlightened notion of truth to wed ourselves 
to any one view of so important a subject, resolving to close our ears and eyes against all impressions 
that oppose themselves to it ? How is any opinion to be strengthened, but by completely comprehending 
the objections that are offered to it, and exposing their futility ? And what have I done more than this ? 
Entrusted as I was for some time with the education of youth, peculiarly circumstanced, was it for me 
to have made them pert and ignorant dogmatists, by permitting them to know what could be said upon 
only one side of grave questions ? Setting aside the narrowness of mind which such a course might 
have evinced, it would have been injurious to the mental energies and acquirements of the young men 
themselves, and (whatever may be said to the contrary), I can vindicate my procedure by quoting no 
less orthodox an authority than Lord Bacon : — “ If a man,” says this Philosopher (and no one ever had 
a better right to pronounce an opinion upon such matters than he) “ will begin with certainties, he shall 
end in doubts.” This I need scarcely observe, is always the case with contented ignorance, when it is 
roused too late to naught. One doubt suggests another, and universal scepticism is the consequence. 

I therefore thought it my duty to acquaint several of the College students with the substance of 
Hume’s celebrated dialogue between Cleanthes and Philo, in which the most subtle and refined argu- 
ments against Theism are adduced. But I have also furnished them with Dr. Reids’ and Dugald 
Stewart’s more acute replies to Hume ; replies which to this day, continue unrefuted. This is the head 
and front of my offending. If the religious opinions of the students have become unhinged in conse- 
quence of the course I have pursued, the fault is not mine. To produce conviction in their minds was 
not within my power, and if I am to be condemned for the atheism of some, let me receive credit for 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


105 


the Theism of others. Believe me, My clear Sir, l am too thoroughly imbued with a deep sense ot 
human ignorance and of the perpetual vicissitudes of opinion, to speak with confidence even of the most 
unimportant matters. Doubt and uncertainty besiege us too closely to admit the boldness of dogmatism 
to enter an enquiring mind ; and far be it from me to say that “ this is” and “ that is not,” when, 
after the most extensive acquaintance with the researches of science, and after the most daring flights 
of genius, we must confess with sorrow and disappointment, that humility becomes the highest wis- 
dom, for the highest wisdom assures man of his ignorance. 

Your next question is ‘‘Do you think respect and obedience to parents no part of moral duty ?” 
For the first time in my life did I learn from your letter that I am charged with having inculcated so 
hideous, so unnatural, so abominable a principle. The authors ot such infamous fabrications are too 
degraded even for my contempt. Had my father been alive, he would have repelled the slander, by 
telling my calumniators that a son who had endeavoured to discharge every filial duty as I have done, 
could never have entertained such a sentiment. But my mother can testify how utterly inconsistent it 
is with my conduct, and upon her testimony I might rest my vindication. However, I will not stop 
short there. So far from having even maintained or taught such opinion, I have always insisted upon 
respect and obedience to parents. I have indeed condemned that feigned respect which some children 
evince, being hypocritical and injurious to the moral character. But 1 have always endeavoured to 
cherish the genuine feelings of the heart, and to direct them into proper channels. Instances, however, 
in which I have insisted upon respect and obedience to parents are not wanting. I shall quote two 
important ones for your satisfaction, and as the parties are always at hand, you may at any time sub- 
stantiate what I say. About two or three months ago, Dukhinanundun Mookerjya (who has made so 
great a noise lately,) informed me that his father's treatment of him had become utterly unsupportable, 
and that his only chance of escaping it was by leaving his father’s house. Although I was aware of the 
truth of what he had said, I dissuaded him from taking such a course, letting him know that much 
should be endured from a parent, and that the world would not justify his conduct, if lie left his home 
without being actually turned out of it. He took my advice, though, I regret to say, only for a short 
time : a few weeks ago he left his father’s house, and to my great surprize, engaged another in my 
neighbourhood. After he had completed his arrangements with his landlord, he informed me for the 
first time of what he had done, and when I asked him why he had not consulted me before he took such 
a step — “ because,” replied he, “ I knew you would have prevented it.” The other instance relates to 
Mohes Grander Singh. Having recently behaved rudely to his father, and offended some of his relatives, 
he called upon me at my house, wdth his uncle, Umacharan Bose, and his cousin, Nundolol Singh. I 
reproached him severely for his contumacious behaviour, and told him until he sought forgiveness from 
his father, I would not speak to him. I might mention other cases, but these may suffice. 

“ Do you think marriages of brothers and sisters innocent and allowable ?” This is your third 
question. “ No,” is my distinct reply, and I never taught such an absurdity. But I am at a loss to 
find out how such misrepresentations as those to which I have been exposed, have become current. 
No person who has ever heard me speak upon such subjects could have circulated these untruths ; at 
least I can hardly bring myself to think that one of the College students with whom I have been con- 
nected could be either such a fool as to mistake every thing I ever said, or such a knave as wilfully to 
mistake my opinions. I am rather disposed to believe that weak people who are determined upon 
being alarmed, and finding nothing to be frightened at, have imputed these follies to me. That I 
should be called a sceptic and an infidel is not surprizing, as these names are always given to persons 
who dare think for themselves in religion ; but I assure you that the imputations which you say are 
alleged against me, I have learned for the first time from your letter, never having dreamed that 
sentiments so opposed to my own, could have been ascribed to me. I must trust, therefore, to your 
generosity to give the most unqualified contradiction to these ridiculous stories. I am not a greater 
monster than most people ; though I certainly should not know myself, were I to credit all that is said 
of me. I am aware that for some weeks some busy bodies have been 'manufacturing the most absurd 
and groundless stories about me, and even about my family. Some fools went so far as to say that my 
sister, while others said that my daughter (though I have not one) was to have been married to a Hindoo 
young man ! ! ! I traced the report to a person named Bindabun Ghosal, a poor Brahmin, who lives 
by going from house to house to entertain the inmates with the news of the day, which he invariably 
invents. However, it is a satisfaction to reflect, that scandal, though often noisy, is not everlasting. 

Now that I have replied to your questions, allow me to ask you, my dear Sir, whether the expediency 
of yielding to popular clamour can be offered in justification of the measures adopted by the native 
managers of the College towards me ? their proceedings certainly do not record any condemnation of 
me, but does it not look very like condemnation of a man’s conduct and character to dismiss him from 
office when popular clamour is against him ? Vague reports and unfounded rumours went abroad 
concerning me : the native managers have confirmed them by acting towards me, as they have done. 
Excuse my saying it, but I believe there was a determination on their part to get rid of me, not to 
satisfy popular clamour, but their own bigotry. Had my religion and morals been investigated by them 
they could have no grounds to proceed against me : they therefore thought it most expedient to make 
no enquiry, but with anger and precipitation to remove me from the institution. The slovenly manner 
in which they have done so is a sufficient indication of the spirit by which they were moved, for in their 
rage, they have forgotten what was due even to common decency. Every person who has heard of the 
way in which they have acted, is indignant ; but to complain of their injustice, would be paying them a 
greater compliment than they deserve. 

In concluding this address, allow me to apologize for its inordinate length, and to repeat my thanks 
tor all that you have done for me in the unpleasant affair by which it had been occasioned. 

1 remain, my dear Sir, your’s sincerely, 

(Signed) H. L. V. Derozio. 


p 


106 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


It was now that Derozio, who had for some time past been the Sub-Editor of the India Gazette, 
had assisted certain students of the College in publishing a periodical entitled “ The Enquirer, and had 
conducted a small evening paper, the Hesperus, came to the resolution of establishing a large daily 
paper, the East Indian. He called upon his countrymen to assist him, and they responded to his call. 
Poor Derozio was, however, never a popular Editor. 

Derozio was arrested in the midst of his labours by the hand of death. He died of Cholera Morbus, 
on the ‘23d December, 1831, in the 22d year of his age. He lingered full six days, and hopes were 
entertained by some of his friends, that his life would be spared. But it had been decreed otherwise. 
He was attended in his illness by Drs. Tytler and Grant ; the latter gentleman came daily to see him, 
and read to him passages from the second Book of the “ Pleasures of Hope.” On the Sunday preceding 
his death, the late Mr. J. W. Ricketts, the distinguished East Indian, called to see him, to him Derozio 
expressed a wish to see the Rev. James Hill, whose eloquence had before touched his heart. The Rev. 
Gentleman came, and it is consolatory to remark, that, in his last moments, Derozio confessed that he 
was a Christian, and he died a believer in the saving faith of Jesus Christ. His career was short 
but glorious ! 

Derozio’s admiring countrymen met after his death, to consider of the erection of a permanent, 
memorial of their affection and regard for his memory. The sum of money collected for a Monument 
over his grave was about 800 rupees. This amount was misappropriated, and Derozio’s grave is now 
undistinguished among the crowded tombs of the Park Street Cemetery. 

In private life, Derozio was much beloved. He was an affectionate son, a kind brother, and a warm 
friend. He was very lively and humorous. We confidently state that anger was never seen to cloud 
his brow. All was sunshine with him. As a teacher, he won the affections of his pupils. Never was 
he known to speak rudely to them. If he wished any of them to keep out of his way his usual language 
was, “ My dear boy, you are not transparent.” 

In conversation he was brilliant. He loved to discourse on, — 

“ Fate, freewill, foreknowledge absolute,” 

and on this subject he was superficial and arrogant. He is now nearly forgotten. We understand 
that his writings have been published, and we sincerely hope that the writings of this man of genius will 
not be lost, but that they will preserve his name for some years to come. 

The compilers have been at some pains to trace the spot in ivhich his remains were deposited , and 
find that the grave is at the Western extremity of the Old (South) Park Street Burial Ground, next 
to the Monument of Major Moling, on the South. 


Sacred to the Memory of David Baker, 
born 6th November 1832, and departed this life 
the 2d June 1834, deeply and sincerely regret- 
ted by his parents, Thos. and Martha Baker. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Bird, 
Daughter of Robert Bird, Esq. of Taplon, 
Bucks, and sister of Robert M. Bird, Esq. B. C. S. 

who having quitted her home and country to 
comfort an afflicted brother, devoted herself to 
teaching the knowledge of Christ to the hea- 
then, especially to those of her own sex, and having 
laboured five years at Goruckpore, and with 
much blessing and acceptance four years in Cal- 
cutta, was called to her eternal rest 29th of 
May 1834, aged 47 years. 

“ They that be wise shall shine as the bright- 
ness of the firmament, and they that turn many 
to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.” — 
Danl. 12 ch. 3. v. 


To the Memory of Mr. David Mills, 
who died 1st June 1834, after a residence of 41 
years in India, aged 65 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Helen Henderson, 

who departed this life on the 28th June 1823, 
aged 18 years. 

To the Memory of ‘William, Infant son of 
Captain H. W. Wilkinson, and Susan his wife. 
Born 2nd October 1822, died 20th July 1823, 
aged 9 months and 18 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of James Middleton, 
who departed this life 15th December, 1822, 
aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas "Wood, 
Colonel of Engineers, and Companion of the most 
Honorable order of the Bath, -who after fifty 
years service in the Bengal army, died at Calcut- 
ta, aged 68 years and 7 months. 

On the 22nd day of January, A. D. 1834, among 
distinguished comrades, he stood eminent for 
talents of a high order, cultivated by science and 
matured by experience, gained in a brilliant career 
of active service and of distinguished profes- 
sional employment, domestic and foreign, in war 
and in peace, through Hindostan and the Deccan, 
in Assam and in Ava, in the Surveyor General’s 
Department and in the campaigns of Lord Lake, 
who selected him to be his Engineer in Chief ' 
with the grand army. As a member of society, 
he was remarkable for cheerful wit regulated 
by goodness of temper and heart ; as a friend his 
good deeds passed ordinary measure, and 
death disclosed liberalities which living modesty 
had concealed. In his domestic relations that 
he was greatly loving and loved, a sorrowing and 
numerous family seek to bear pious witness 
by this insufficient and frail memorial. 

This Monument, erected by James McNeight, 
is Sacred to the Memory of his beloved and 
lamented wife Eliza, who died the 6th of 
August 1823, aged 38 years. 

In Memory of William Mann, Esq. 
of the firm of Buchanan, Mann and Co. He died 
and was interred here on 10th August 1823, 
aged 38 years and 4 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. B. B. Dormieux 
who departed this life 29th Dec. 1833, aged * 
21 years and 26 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


107 


Sacred to the Memory of Anne, wife of 
Lieut. T. S. O’Halloran, H. M. 44th Regt. 
who departed this life on the 24th of July 1823, 
aged 24 years, 5 months, and 14 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain ‘William Reynolds, 

formerly of the “ Royal George,” who died the 
9th of December 1833, aged 52 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Catherine, 
infant daughter of Frederick and Maria Millett, 
born 3d October 1833, died 6th January 1834. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Henry Parker, 
of Deal, in the county of Kent, who died on the 
2nd November 1835. 


Sacred to the Memory of Wm. Thompson, Esq. 
of Mary Port, in the county of Cumberland, 
late commander of the ship “ Captain Cook,” 
who departed this life on the 20th May 1834, 
aged 56 years. 

He was a good husband, an affectionate father, 
and sincere friend. His loss will be severely felt by 
many. This tablet is placed here as the last mark 
of respect, by his affectionate son, Wm. Thompson. 

In Memory of "William Warren 'Wood, Esq. 
of Tirhoot. 

To the purest honor and integrity he united 
unfeigned benevolence and every social and ami- 
able virtue. A pious son, affectionate brother, 
and constant friend. He died greatly regretted. 
MStatis suae 55. Resurgam. 

To Carrol Humphrey, Esq. M. D. 
of Albany, N. York, U. States of America, who 
died at Calcutta while attached as Surgeon to the 
American ship “ Edward,” of Philadelphia, 
May 21st, 1834. 


Sacred to the Memory of Maria Elizabeth, 
wife of the Rev. Theophilus Beichardt, who died 
March 16th, 1834, aged 40 years. 

A firm believer in Jesus ; an active and benevolent 
Christian ; an ornament of her sex ; universally 
loved and esteemed by all who knew her. She was 
truly one of those of whom the world was not 
worthy. Heb. xi. 38. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Richardson, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, Magistrate of the 24 Pergun- 
nahs, and Superintendant of the Alipore Jail, 
who was unhappily murdered by the convicts 
under his charge, whilst engaged in the exercise of I 
his official duty, on the 5th April 1834, MEtat. 34. 

Thus in the mysterious providence of the 
Almighty was cut off in the prime of life and in 
the midst of a career of usefulness, an officer 
distinguished in his public capacity by intelligence, 
integrity and honor. His character as a private 
individual is enshrined in the affectionate recollec- 
tions of his friends and is cherished still more 
dearly in the heart of his afflicted widow, by whom 
this stone is erected. 


Sacred to the Memory of Capt. J. W 1 - Porte, 
Pensioner in the Mahratta Service, who died 4th 
November 1833, aged 60 years. 

This Monument is erected by his beloved wife, 
Mary Porte, 
r 2 


To the Memory of "V5r r alter Nisbet, C. S. 
who departed this life on the 11th October 1833, 
aged 43 years. 

This Monument is erected by his three brothers 
and a few of his most attached friends as a mark 
of the warm affection they bore him in life, and of 
the deep sorrow with which they now deplore 
his loss. A tablet has also been erected to his 
Memory in St, John’s Cathedral. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Clarke Bell, 
many years a Captain of this port. Obit. 26th 
October 1834, aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Col. John Vaughan, 
Fort and Town Major of Fort William. Obit. 1st 
November 1830, Mi tat 52 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Du Bisson, Esq. Merchant, 
died 9th September 1830, aged 68 years. 


Thomas Russell Clarke, 

born 22d September 1830, died 24th Oct. 1830. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Busch, Esq. 
who died on the 3d of Sept. 1823, aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Befever, 
eldest daughter of Henry Hall, Esq. of Carlisle. 
Obit. 1st September 1823, MEtatis 23 years. 

Tho’ low in earth your virtuous form decay’d, 

My faithful wife, my loved Mary’s laid ; 

In chastity you kept a husband’s heart 
To all but him as cold as now thou art. 

To name your virtues ill befits his grief : 

What was his bliss can now give no relief ; 

Your husband mourns, the rest let friendship tell, 
Fame spread your worth, your husband knew it 
well. 

“ Her ways were ways of pleasantness, 
and all her paths were peace.” 


In Memory of 

Mrs. Charlotte Caroline Harris, 

the beloved wife of Mr. C. W. Harris, and second 
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. C. Lefever, 
who departed this life on the 10th of May 1845, 
aged 21 years, 8 months and 25 days. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 

Sacred to the Memory of George Walter, Esq. 
Lieut, in the Bengal Engineers, who died from 
fever, got at Saugor in the execution of his duty as 
Surveyor, on the 5th Sept. 1823, aged 22 years. 
His loss is sincerely regretted by all his friends. 
He was a most amiable youth and most promis- 
ing officer ; beloved and esteemed by all 
who knew him. 


Humphrey Bangley, Esq. 

Chief Officer of the ship “ Woodford,” died 2d 
September 1823, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Edward Doveton, 
of the Madras Establishment, Aide-de-Camp ‘ 
to General Sir John Doveton, died on 
the 16th Sept. 1823, aged 22 years and 9 months. 


108 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


In Memory of Mr. William Clark, 
who departed this life 1st of August 1826, aged 
58 years, 4 months and 19 days. 

Think O ye who fondly languish 
O’er the grave of those you love, 

While your bosoms throb with anguish 
They are warbling hymns above ; 

While your silent steps are straying 
Lonely thro’ night’s deepening shade, 
Glory’s brightest beams are playing 
Round the happy Christian’s head. 

“ As for me I will behold thy face in righteous- 
ness, I shall be satisiied when 1 awake with 
thy likeness. Ps 17. 15.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry Hugh, 
the infant son of William and Jane Clark, 
Obit.. 2d July 1842, iEtat. 8 mos. and 20 days. 
Also of Theodore, 

born 5th Dec. 1842, died 26th May 1843. 

“ He shall gather the lambs with his arms and 
carry them in his bosom.” 


To the Memory of Mr. George Minor, 
of the II. C. Pilot Service, Obit. 29th July 1824, 
aged 28 years and 10 months. 

Lord I commit my soul to thee, 

Accept the sacred trust, 

Receive this nobler part of me, 

And watch my sleeping dust. 

This stone is erected by bis afflicted widow. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Murray, 
Obit. 15tli July 1827, iEt. 31 years, 

7 months and 5 days. 

Thou art gone to the grave but we will not de- i 
plore thee, 

Since God was thy refuge, thy ransom, thy guide ; 
He gave thee, he took thee and he will restore thee 
And death has no sting since the saviour has died. 
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of 
his saints. — 16 Ps. 15 v. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Thompson, 
Obit. 10th December 1827, vEt. 56 years, 

9 months and 26 days. 

Dear is the spot where Christians sleep 
And sweet the strain which angels pour ; 

Oh ! why should we in anguish weep, 

He is not lost but gone before. 

“ Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, 
for the end of that man is peace.” — Ps. 37. 37. 

Here Iieth the remains of Mr. David Phillips, 
who departed this life on the 24th Sept. 1823, 
aged 87 years. 

Around thy venerable tomb 

With fond affections still thy children come, 

And tho’ no more the loud voiced hymn they sing, 
Still silent prayers and heartfelt wishes bring. 

That thy departed spirit secure and blest 
May with the destined heirs of glory rest ; 

And for thy tender cares here bestowed 
Treasure in heaven may have and joy in God. 


Sacred to the Memory of Helen, 
the beloved wife of Edward Lee Warner, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Service and eldest daughter of 
Dr. Macrae of Chittagong. 

Born September 26, 1796, died September 1, 1830. 
“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


To the Memory of James Rodger, 

Capt. 2d Batn. 9 Regt. M. N. 1. who died off 
Fultah on 22d Sept. 1823, aged 36 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Brown, Esq. 
late of Gibraltar, who departed this life the 14th 
Aug. 1830, aged about 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Smith, 
wife of Mr. Samuel Smith, and only daughter of 
the late Charles Clavering, Esq., died 6th August 
1830, aged 28 years, 5 months and 17 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Charlotte Wenifred Smith, 

wife of Samuel Smith, Esq. and daughter of the 
late Col. Lafleur, died 17th September 1841, 
aged 30 years. 

And that of Alexander, 
died 20th April 1840, aged 6 days. 


Also in Memory of George Thomas, 
son of Samuel and Charlotte Smith, died 12th Jan. 
1838, aged 1 year, 6 months and 26 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Anne Tickell, 
wife of Lieut. -Col. Rd. Tickell, C. B. of the 
Engineers, who departed this life 27th Sept. 1833, 
respected, beloved and regretted by all who 
knew her. .Etat. 44. 

Erected by her affectionate and afflicted husband. 
Farewell bless’d shade ; if ought below 
May reach thy world of bliss, 

May added joy be thine to know 
How thou wert loved in this. 


In Memory of Mr. Alexander Paterson, 

son of Alexander George Paterson, Esq., who de-. 
parted this life 25th Dec. 1823, 
aged 20 years, 11 months and 16 days. 

Mrs. Hannah Hammond, 

departed this life on the 9th October 1833, 
aged 55 years. 


In Memory of Mary Ann Watkinson, 

died 16th September 1835, aged 16 years, 

1 month and 27 days. 

Also ot her father, Mr. J. VSTatkinson, 
died 4th June 1837, aged 53. 


To the Memory of 
Colonel Sir James Mouat, Bart. 

Bengal Engineers, 

who departed this life at sea on Board the H . C. 
Ship “ Prince Regent,” the 9th May 1829, 
aged about 63 years. 


Sir Janies Mouat served as a soldier in India 
46 years, acted as Aid-de-Camp to Sir Robert 
Abercromby, in 1794, at the battle of the Rohil- 
las, and in 1804 was elected Professor of Hin- 
dostanee in the College of Fort William. His 
merits were repeatedly noted in the orders of 
Government, but his elegant manners, brilliant 
talents, classic taste, literary accomplishments, 
amiable disposition, and native goodness of heart, 
could alone, be justly estimated by his friends. 
This tablet has been placed as a tribute of 
regard, esteem and affection, to a lamented 
parent, by Dr. Mouat, M. D. Surgeon H. M. 

13th Dragoons. 




SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


109 


This tomb is erected to the Memory of 
Colonel Charles Mouat, Cliief Engineer 
on the Bengal Establishment, who departed this 
life at Fort William on the 25th of June 1830, 
aged 68 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charlotte Eliza Dick, 
the infant daughter of John and Harriet Lowe, 
taken from them the 4th July 1S30, 
aged 14 months and 17 days. 

Also her beloved brother, 

William Henry Mating-, 
who died on the 20th October 1830, 
aged 3 years and 1 month. 


Consecrated to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elvira Wiltshire, 
wife, of Thomas Wiltshire Esq., born the 27th 
September 1807, died at Calcutta on the 
22d April 1830, aged 22 years 6 months 
and 24 days. 

Yes I must weep tho’ reason oft in vain 
Bids my fond heart, its heaving sighs restrain, 
And oft suggests to my afflicted mind 
That earthly virtues, heavenly joys shall find. 
Go then, dear shade, thy just reward receive, 
Fate bids me trust, tho’ nature bids me grieve. 
I bow submissive to the will divine, 

Mine is the sorrow, be the glory thine. 


Sacred to the Memory of E. Kosky, Esq. 
born the 13th February 1777, 
died the 2d June 1830. 


Mark Middleton, Obit. 23rd May 1830. 


Sacred to the Memory of Col. Henry Imlach, 
who entered the H. C. Service as a Cadet of In- I 
fantry in 1782, was appointed Secretary to 
the Board of Superintendence for the breed of 
cattle on the 31st July 1802 ; Deputy Mili- 
tary Auditor General 25th June 1804, and suc- 
ceeded to the head of that department on the 
11th July 1811, the duties of which offices he 
discharged with honor and credit to himself 
and to the perfect satisfaction of the Government 
under which he served, till the close of his 
earthly career on the 8th March 1830, 
aged 69 years, 9 months and 8 days. 

1 This Monument is erected as a tribute of affec- 
tion by his son, Alexander Imlach. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain ^Villiam Lumsdaine, 

Deputy Commissary General of the Army, 
who died on the 6th January 1830, aged 38 years. 
Distinguished in public life by talent, honor and 
industry ; beloved and esteemed in private 
society for his mild virtues and pecu- 
liarly amiable general character. 

This stone is inscribed as a last sad tribute to the 
remains of one who in life possessed with the 
highest claims to the public admiration, the warm 
private friendship of numerous individuals, 
amongst whom were ranked some of the 
first characters in India, and carried with him to 
the tomb the sincere regret of all 
who knew him. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Margaret Gee, 
who departed this life on the 6th of Oct. 1823, I 
aged 55 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eaura, 
the wife of Edmund W ilkinson, who departed this 
life on board the H. C. Ship “ Thomas Gren- 
ville,” at Saugor, on the 6th of March 1828, 
aged 37 years. 

A most affectionate and virtuous wdfe, the best of 
mothers and a most sincere friend. 

My soul with grateful thoughts of love entirely is 
possess’d, 

Because the Lord vouchsafes to hear the voice of 
my request ; 

On God’s Almighty name I call and thus to Him 
I pray’d, 

Lord I beseech thee save my soul with sorrows 
quite dismay’d 

Then free from pensive cares, my soul resume thy 
wonted rest, 

For God has wondrously to thee, His bounteous 
love express’d. 

Then what return to him shall I for all his good- 
ness make, 

I’ll praise his name, and with glad zeal the cup of 
blessing take. 

Also of Mary Dize, 

their second daughter, who departed this life 
12th Oct. 1823, aged 4 years. 

A most interesting and loved child. 

Sweet flow’r farewell, too fair for earth, 

Brief space to us thy charms were given, 

The hand that form’d thee, knew thy worth, 

And took thee ’mongst his own in heav’n. 

Sacred to the Memory of Catlicart Methven, 
Captain in the 20th Regt. B. N. I., who departed 
this life 26tli November 1823, HE tat is. — 


In remembrance of her who was admired and 
beloved by all, 

Eleanora, 

the beloved wife of W. H. Websterfield of the 
town of Calcutta, Attorney at Law. 

She departed this transitory life on the 2d Dec, 
1823, in the 27th year of her age. 

This humble Memorial is erected by him who has 
no other source of regret, than that he sur- 
vives her irreparable loss. 

Peace ! everlasting peace to her ! 

Charles Rayner, Esq. 

Surgeon of the Ship “ Woodford,” died 15th 
Dec. 1823, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut.-Col. Francis Drummond, 

of the Bengal Army, who departed this life on the 
7th of Dec. 1823, aged 60. 

No man possessed a more kind or benevolent 
heart than he who lies beneath this silent tomb. 
His virtues will long be cherished in the hearts 
of those to whom his friendship was dear. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr Henry Davies, 
who departed this life on the 8th Dec. 1823, 
aged 32 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Samuel Sweeting, 
Branch Pilot of the H. C. Pilot Service, 
who departed this life 
on the morning of the 21st October 1823, 
aged 39 years and 3 months. 


Master Win. Sweeting-, 

who died on the 18th of Feb. 1830, aged 17 years. 



110 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Here reposeth the remains of Mr. Robert Finch, 
youngest son of John Finch, Esq. 
of Hendon, Middlesex, 
who departed this life on the 15th Feb. 1842, 
aged 23 years, 4 months and 2 days. 

Kind angels watch the sleeping dust 
Till Jesus comes to raise the just, 

Then may he wake with sweet surprise 
And in his Saviour’s image rise. 

This tablet is placed by his afflicted widow, 
Eliza Finch 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Maria Elizabeth Ricketts, 

Wife of Mordaunt Ricketts, Bengal Civil Service, 
born 10th March 1794, died 18th Jan. 1824. 
Her short but eventful life was passed in the strict 
performance of every duty. She was a most 
dutiful child ; a most affectionate wife and sister ; 
and so truly pious and good, that her affectionate 
and afflicted husband and family, 
derive some consolation from the conviction 
that her immortal soul is now reposing in 
the bosom of her Creator. 


Here are deposited the mortal remains of 
Mrs. Jane Bacosta, 

who departed this life on the 2nd January, 1830, 
aged 49 years and 10 months. 

Also that of her consort, George Bacosta, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 25th day of April, 
1838, aged 67 years, 7 months and 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Cicilia Llewelyn, 
who departed this life 9th of November 1815, 
aged 31 years and 7 months. 

Earth on earth remember well 
When earth to earth shall go to dwell , 

Then earth in earth shall close remain, 

Till earth from earth shall come again. 

Gen. c. iii. v. 19. Ecle. c. xii. v. 7 


To the Memory of Jo.l;a Eliza, 
who departed this life on the 15th October, 1822, 
aged 18 months. 

Also Julia, who departed this life 
on the 28th October, 1825, aged 9 months. 
The infant children of Jenkin and Anna Llewelyn. 
Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 

Death came with friendly care, 

The opening buds to Heaven convey’d, 

And bade them blossom there. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza, 
wife of Mr. W. Llewelyn, who departed this life 
on the 9th December, 1838, after a short illness 
of 14 days, aged 36 years, 
leaving a husband and five children 
to bemoan their loss. 


Eleanor, daughter of John Smith, Esq. 
of Drongan, in the county of Air, 
died 13th July, 1818, aged 8 months 7 days. 


Mungo, his only son, 

died 3d Augt. 1824, aged 11 months 11 days. 
Eleanor, his beloved wife, 
on board the ship “ Providence” in Lat. 16 North, 
Long. 88 = 15 East, on the 29th May, 1835, 
aged 27 years. 


To the Memory of 

Tho* Mayne Browne, Esq., who departed this 
life September 8, 1807, aged 12 years. 


Robert Bruce, infant son of 
Henry Francis and Eliza Paton Hough, 
died 15th April, A. D. 1821, aged 16 weeks. 


In Memory of 

Sarah Eliza Catharine Boulton 

daughter of Thomas and Sarah Boulton. 

Obt. 5th July, 1821. JEt. 9 months. And also of 
Charlotte Augusta Boulton, 
daughter of the above ; 

Obt. 14th Feb. 1826. JEt. 1 year 7 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Charles Bennett, 

who died 15th February, 1816, aged 65 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Robert Brown, 

who departed this life 9th July 1805, aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliza Sallet, 

who departed this life 9th Jan. 1806, aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Malcolm, 
Infant son of Malcolm and Eliza McKenzie, 
died 15th August 1825, aged 7 days. 


Gavin, son of Captain Gavin Young, 
born July 13, and died November 15, 1821. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Ann Heywood, 
wife of Isaac Heywood, who departed this 
life 30th May 1804, aged 17 years 7 months. 
XL. c. Isaiah, 1 v. Comfort ye, comfort 
ye my people, saith your God.” 


Here lies the mortal remains of 
Ebenezer, son of J. G. J. 

Obiit 6 July, 1814. 

John George Jefferson, Obiit 27 August 1814. 

Charles White, Obit, 15 September 1815, 
George Charles Jefferson, Obiit 6 June 1821. 
“ Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.” 


In Memory of Miss Eliza Anne Goulder, 

who died 1st August 1815, aged 13 years 6 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Bowdesswell, 
a lovely infant son of Capt. J. B. Seely, 
died 20th Nov. 1821, aged 2 years 1 month. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Morison, E<q. 
who died 19th January 1815, aged 36. 


Beneath this dreary tomb doth lie 
As much virtue as could die. 

Mrs. Ann M’Carthy, 
the lady of Captain James M’Carthy, 
and daughter of Captain Alexander Smart, 
who departed this life piously 9th Sept. 1815, 
sincerely and most deservedly lamented 
by her husband, an aged mother, 
and numerous acquaintances. 

She was a real friend to the indigent and 
distressed, and left several orphans she 
brought up to mourn over her grave. 

May her soul rest in peace with God. Amen. 


Ill 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Col. George Hickson Pagan, 

at the early age of 33. 

Adjutant General of the Army. 

He possessed in an eminent degree 
the qualities which command respect 
and ensure success in public life. 
Inflexible in principle, 

steady in the object of his honorable pursuit, 
he devoted with zeal, which knew no limit 
to exertion, the energies of a powerful mind, 
to the service he loved and adorned ; 
to it he sacrificed health and fortune. 

In private life as a friend, brother, father and hus- 
band, in all which relations he has left those 
who will long weep over his untimely grave. 

He was honored and loved. 

Obiit iEtatis 42. 

His remains are interred near those 
of his sister, whom he cherished and mourned. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah, the wife of 

Benjamin Comberbach, of Garden Reach. 
Died Sept. 18, 1821, 
aged 51 years ; deeply lamented. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Comberbach, Esq. 
of Calcutta, Attorney at Law, died 3d 
August 1823, aged 53 years ; deeply lamented. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Reeves, 
widow of the late Mr. J. B. Reeves, 
who departed this life December 21, 1815, 
aged 44 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Frances Tomkyns, 
who departed this life 10th October 1815, 
aged 23 years, 4 months and 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Daly, Esq late.of Madras, 
who departed this life April 18, 1807. 

This Monument 

is erected by his widow, Rachel Susannah Daly. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Emily Christie, 

third danghter of Capt. Charles Christie, 
of Gunnirbury Lodge, in the county of 
Middlesex. She departed this life 4th of 
July 1821, aged 17 years. 


Master "Wm. Harvey, died 10th August, 1816, 
aged 4 years and 6 months ; 
and Miss Jane Harvey, 
died 28th August 1823, aged 26 years and 9 
months. Also Mr. Francis Harvey, 
died 18th March 1835, agetl 60 years, 

1 month and 9 days. 




In remembrance of 
Mrs. Margaret Potter, 

beloved wife of Samuel Potter, 
who died 17th April 1825, 
aged 27 years, 1 month and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory ol Eliza, 
wife of Henry Cooke, Esquire, who departed 
this life the 18th July 1821, aged 39 years. 
Most deservedly and sincerely regretted 
by all her relatives and friends. 

Beneath this Marble 
are deposited also the mortal remains of 
Elizabeth Frances Peard, 

Niece of the above named Eliza Cooke, 
and daughter of the late Philip Peard, Esq. 
of Ely Place, in the County of Middlesex, 
who at the early age of 19 years, and 
after a few months residence in Calcutta 
was called away from the society of 
her family and friends, in the joylul 
hope of endless rest in the bosom of 
her Father and her God. 

Obiit 27 months ; Die Jan. 1824. 


Within this Tomb 
are also deposited the remains of 
Henry Cooke, Esq. 
who departed this life 29th January 1828, 
aged 59 years and 29 days. 

Sacked to the Memory of 
Lieutenant Brook Watson, 

24th Regiment Bengal N. Infantry, 
who departed this life 1 1 day of October 1817, 
aged 30 years. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth, the wife of 
Captain Daniel Ross, of Iiourah, 
and daughter of Lieut. George Forbes, Bombay 
army, who was born on the 18th of October 1781, 
and departed this life 8th of February 1818. 
Erected by her disconsolate husband. 


To the Memory of 

Lieutenant Edward Gyfford, II. M. 14th Regt 
w'ho departed this life2 IstDec. 1817, aged 22 years. 


Mrs. Anna Townshend, 

born 27 December 1805, died 15 August 1822. 
Aged 16 years, 7 months 18 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliza Clark, 
wife of Mr. Clark, 

of the Country Service, who departed 
this life 25 October 1812, aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Susan Cadell, wife of 
George Cadell, Major, Madras Establishment, 
who departed this life on the 1 June 1818, 
aged 27 years. 

The choicest blessing which could have 
been bestowed upon her husband, family 
and friends, she possessed the purest 
and liveliest faith in our blessed Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, through him alone 
she expected redemption. 

The warmest affections of the heart and 
a highly cultivated mind were in her so 
happily united that no words can 
express her inestimable worth. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Arrabella Robertson, 

who departed this life on 19th July 1817, 
at the early age of 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Major Wilson, Esq. 
of the Bengal Medical Establishment, 
who died 24 May 1818, aged 40 years. 


112 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. George Humphreyes, 

a native of Newington in Kent, 
and Branch Pilot in the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life 29 April 1816, 
aged 48 years. 

This stone what few vain marbles can, 
May truly say, here lies an honest man. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Hannah Maria, daughter of the late 
Captain John Campbell, Madras Artillery, 
who departed this life Sept. 4th, 1817, 
aged 19 years. 

This Monument is erected by her 
affectionate and only sister Adelaide, 
wife of Captain Archibald Galloway, 
of the Bengal army. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain 'William Friend, 

Obiit October 7, 1817, .Etat 47 years. 

Lamented and much regretted is thy end, 

By those who knew thy worth, poor friend. 


This Monument is erected to commemorate the 
departed worth of John Colman, Esq. 
many years resident of Calcutta. He was dis- 
tinguished for his unbounded benevolence, 
urbanity of manners, and strict integrity. He 
lived esteemed and died regretted by all who had 
the pleasure of his acquamtance. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Kearn Delany, 
who departed this life on the 4th of Sept. 1817, 
aged 41 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of T. Spens, Esq. M. D. 
who died 4th Jan. 1836, aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Colvin, Esq. 
Obit. 24th December 1835, Mt. 36 years, 
Regretted by all who had the pleasure 
of his acquaintance. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain J. F. May, 72d Regt. N. I. 
who departed this life on 22d February 1836, 
aged 36 years. 

This Tablet is erected by the officers of his Regt. 
as a token of their esteem and regard. 


Edeline Elizabeth, 

4th daughter of Charles De Verinne, died 1 5th 
January 1836, aged 17 months 10 days. 


Alfred Durand, 

fourth son of Francis William Durand, died 4th 
Dec. 1843, aged 3 years, 1 month and 4 days. 


In Memory of Mrs. Emma Higgins, 

died 1st March 1836, aged 32 years. 


To the Memory of J. W. Alexander, 

whose open nature, warm affections and a mind 
deeply imbued with the purest principles of 
honor and of truth, secured the regard of many 
valued friends and very general esteem. 

He died January 23, 1816, aged 31, 
Sincerely regretted. 


Sacred to the Memory of David Thriepland, Esq. 
several years a Magistrate of the Town of Calcutta, 
who departed this life on the 20th November 
1817, aged 43 years, 

Greatly beloved by a numerous circle of friends, 
a few of whom have erected this Monument 
in testimony of his virtues and their own regret. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Ann Agnes Patch, 

died 1st March 1824, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Taylor, Esq. 
who died the 4th of Dec. 1822, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of the Honorable, Francis, 
aged 29 years ; 

second son of the Right Honorable Hugh 
Lord Sempill. Calcutta 2d Jan. 1823. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Elizabeth Clara Dunsterville, 

who departed this life the 10th of Dec. 1822. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs, Jane Cooper, 
wife of Captain George Cooper, Bengal Army, 
who departed this life the 20th February 1823, 
aged 43 years, 2 months and 27 days. 

1 ‘ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Col. ''William Kennedy, 

Deputy Auditor General of the Bengal Army, 
Obit. 7th January 1836, aged 52 years. 


To the Memory of Benjamin McMahon, 

and Harriet, his wife. 




Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Bridget Gilmore, 
who died on the 22d June 1835, aged 33 years. 


m 


1 o the Memory of VlTilliam Twining, Esq. 
Member of the Royal College of Surgeons 
in London, Surgeon in the Service of the H. E. 
I. Company, Bengal Establishment, first perma- 
nent Assistant Surgeon to the Presidency 
General Hospital, and Secretary to the Medical 
and Physical Society of Calcutta. 

This Monument is erected by his professional 
brethren in India to mark the high sense 
which they entertained of his character and of his 
i eminent services, which he rendered in the cause 
of Medical improvement and research 
in that country. 

Born A. D. 1780, died at Calcutta 25th August 
1835, aged 45 years. 


2 

l 

> 

b 

ol 

4 


Sacred to the Memory of Anne, 

: second daughter of Col. J. D. Shearwood, Bengal J 
Artillery, and wife of David Carmichael 
Smyth, Esq. of Bengal Civil Service, bovn 26th 
Sept. 1798, died 5th June 1835. 

“ Blessed are the pure in heart tor they 
shall see God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Matilda Brown, 

died 1th June 1835, aged 31 years, 2 months. a 
and 9 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


113 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Adams, 

died on the 14th May 1835, aged 35 years, 

5 months and 13 days. 

Also of her infant daughter, Elizabeth, 
died 30th June 1835, aged 1 month 25 days. 

Also Joseph Adams, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 25th May 1837, 
aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Edward Chalcraft, 

who died 11th May 1835, aged 20 years, 

6 months and 28 days. 


Also to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliza Chalci’aft, 
who died 13th May 1835, aged 51 years. 


To the Memory of Anna, 
the wife of Mr. J. R. Coles, Obit. 24th May 
1835, iEt. 37. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Elizabeth Ann, daughter of 
Hugh and Ann Fergusson, who died on the lltli 
Dec. 1822, aged 1 year and 4 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Ann C. Schalch, 

wife of Lieut. John A. Schalch, and daughter of 
James Meik, M. D. who died 15th Dec. 1822, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. John Hadaway, 24th N. I. 
who departed this life 22nd April 1823, 
aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
David Turnbull, Esq. 

who died 14th December 1822, aged 54. 
Having been for a long period Resident at Mirza 
pore, as Civil Surgeon, and engaged in 
extensive trade to almost all parts of the world. 
His name as a mercantile man was 
conspicuous and his loss lamented by many 
personal friends. 


M. S. Mary Ann Dryden, 

Nat. xxv. March 1808. 

Obit. xvii. April 1835. 

“ O Almighty God whose merciful forgiveness and 
power is without limit, we pray thee, raise 
this our sister to a blessed resurrection and to 
eternal happiness in heaven.” 

Also of her son, 'William Dryden, 

Obit. xxii. August 1838, 

Aitat. xiv. years and iv. months. 


John David Clark, 

died 8th April 1835, aged 28 years, 3 months 
and 12 days. 

Erected by James Mungo Clark, to the Memory 
of his brother. 


Sacred to the memory of 
Captain Charles Gray, 
of the country service, who departed this life 2nd 
January 1835, aged 45 years. 

This stone is erected by a sincere and 
attached friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. George Borrodaile, 

of the 49th Regt. N. I. Brigade Major at 
Barrackpore, died 8th January 1835, 
aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Panny, 
the beloved wife of Colonel O’Halloran, C. B. 
died 22d, January 1835, 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Samuel Thomas Goad, Esq. 
some time one of the Judges of the Court of 
Sudder Dewanny Adawlut, who died 25th 
January 1823, at the age of 44 years. 


To the Memory of 

Captain P. O’Reilly, H. M. 44th Regt. 
who died 25th May 1823, aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Scott Robertson, Esq. 

Son of the late J. Robertson, Esq. superintending 
surgeon on the Establishment, who departed 
this life 23rd of April 1823, deeply regretted by all 
his relatives and friends. He was a most 
affectionate and kind brother, and time only can 
soften the affliction caused by his untimely loss, 
to his distressed Sister and Brothers. 


Mr. John Stables, 

Died 16th May 1823. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
The Rev. John Paget Hastings, A. 13. 

who died 22nd August 1822, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 
the beloved Wife of Lieut. -Col. John Raton, 
who lived justly respected in Society, and was 
followed to her grave by the esteem of all classes 
of the community. 

Died 22nd September 1822, aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Patrick Stewart, Esq. 
of the Firm of Stewart and Robertson, merchants, 
who departed this life the 29th day of Oct. 1822, 
in the 53rd year of his age. 

Indebted to nature for a mind firm to benevolence 
and alive to the best feelings of the heart, 
this excellent man passed through life in the 
habitual exercise of every social virtue, artless ; 
unassuming, and modest in his deportment ; 
mild, forbearing, and considerate in his temper. 
Incapable of harbouring, as of uttering an 
uncharitable thought, and prompt in the 
performance of every good action. 

He was eminently distinguished for piety to God, 
unblemished integrity and true Christian charity,’ 
benevolent to man. It was said of him, 
that he never made an enemy and never lost a 
friend, and as he left none of the duties of life un- 
performed, so his exemplary and endearing conduct 
to those with whom he was connected, 
rendered him to them an object of the most 
unbounded affection. In the bitterness of grief, 
under the pressure of a loss so irretrievable 
they will seek consolation where alone it is to be 
found, in the promises of the Gospel : 

“ He that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet 
shall be live, and whosoever liveth and believeth 
in me shall never die.” 


ft 


114 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND: 



Sacred to the Memory of 
George Skardon, 

Son of R. Stewart and Mary his Wife, 
who departed this life 31st July 1836, 
aged one month and 2 days. 

“ Of such is the Kingdom of God.” 

Also to the Memory of Eliza, the Infant daughter 
of R. Stewart and Mary his Wife. 

Born 2nd September 1832, died 18th Augt. 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Wilson Stewart, 

daughter of Robert Stewart, Esq. & Mary his Wife, 
who departed this life 19th December 1822, 
aged 3 years and 4 months. 

Beneath this humble Memorial 
of sincere regret of his Brother Collegians 
lie interred the mortal remains of 
John Innes Shank, Esq. of the Civil Service, 
who died the 28th of Sept. 1834, aged 20. 
Not less to the deep regret of his relations 
and friends in India, than the irreparable 
bereavment of his parents and relatives at home. 


Sacred to the Memory of William Fraser, 
the beloved Son of Alfred and Jane Lingham. 
Died 3rd Nov. 1834, 
aged 1 year, 5 months and 25 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Louisa Maria Trotter, the infant daughter of 
Charles Hogg, Esq. and Louisa Fleming his wife, 
who departed this life 1st of October 1834, 
aged 7 months and 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. E. S. BaCosta, 

wife of Mr. J. S. DaCosta, who departed this life 
on the 12th October 1834, aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Joseph Sennet, 
son of Joseph Marley, Esq. of Moorshedabad, 
who departed this life 6th Dec. 1834, 
aged 6 years and 15 days. 

The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord. 


Sacred to the Memory of It. Barber, 
spinster. Obit. 22d Oct. 1834, Ait. 30 years. 
Beloved of God, called to be saints — nothing is 
perished of us, only deposited. 

Love never dies, her tried enduring love 
Burnt brightly here, flames at its source above ; 
Patient, died meek, in every trial own’d 
The God all gracious, now that faith is crown’d 
Fair was his form, it yet shall rise once more 
From eartli as lovely, as the mind it bore. 

R. W. 


To the Memory of Samuel Robinson, 

son of Peter and Joana Goodall Atkinson, 
born August 11th 1834, died March 19th 1836. 


To the Memory of Captain G. K. Bathie, 
Obit. 1st Sept. 1834, iEt. 36 years. 


Beneath lie the remains of 
Captain Richard L. Laws, 

late commander of the ship Dunvegan Castle, 
who died 2d August 1834, aged 39 years, 7 mos. 

leaving a wife and 4 children to lament the 
untimely loss of an affectionate husband and a 
fond father. This Monument is erected 
by his afflicted widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Cecilia Rosalia Lidiard, 

departed this life, 27th August 1834, aged 
23 years, 1 month and 18 days. 


G. R. Gillanders, Esq. Attorney at Law, 
died 27th July 1834, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
"William Meadows Farrell, 

who departed this life on the 16th April 1823, 
aged 53 years and 2 months. 

No venal muse presumes her voice to raise, 

His pupils grateful here record the praise 
Due to the memory of a teacher’s name, 

Who oft of dormant genius lit the flame ; 

Who as the parent bird its young to fly 
Forces on flutt’ring wings to brave the sky 
And forcing only aids their energy ; 

Would cautious urge the youthful minds’ ad- 
vance, 

Nor urge in vain, o’er learning’s vast expanse, 
In whose warm efforts shar’d an equal part, 

To store the head or mend the youthful heart. 
In whom at once the friends concern’d sincere 
The tutor breath’d and breath’d a father’s care. 
This humble Monument his pupils raise 
A grateful tribute to their tutor’s praise. 


Sacred to the Memory of Peter T^Tatson, Esq. 
who departed this life 19th April 1823, 
aged 52 years. 

Highly esteemed and very sincerely and deservedly 
regretted with a grateful remembrance 
of his many amiable virtues. 

This Monument is erected to his Memory 
by his affectionate brother, Alexander Watson. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jessy "Welsh, 
who departed this life, 30 May 1823, aged 46 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Gilmore, Esq. 
who departed this life on 22d March 1823, 
aged 60 years. 


To the Memory of John Forsyth, 
of the H. C. Civil Service, who died on the 26th 
May 1823, in the — year of his age. 


Sacred to the Memory of Juliana, 
relict of the late William Morton, Esq. of 
Futtyghur, and sister to Mary Anne, wife of 
A. Ross, Esq. She departed this life on the 10th 
September 1833, aged 41 years, 

1 month and 11 days. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


"William Pinckney, Esq. 
of the H. C. Service, Officiating Agent, Sc c. Sec. 
at Kedgeree, died Aug. 9, 1834, aged 45 years. I 
An active public servant and an honest man. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Cleland Guthrie, 

Major H. M. 44th Regiment. Born 21st July 
1783, who departed this life 4th of June 1823, 


aged 39 years, 10 months and 14 days. 




SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


115 


To the Memory of Robert Ross Young, 

i3d son of the late John Young, Esq. of Bellwood, 
who died ‘21st May 1823, aged 24 years. 


To the Memory of Lieut. 'William Sargent, 
H. M. 44th Regt. who died 6tli June 1823, 
aged 26. 


To the Memory of 
Henry Middleton Sterndale, 

late of the H. C. Naval Service, died 3d June 
1834, aged 39 years. 


To the Memory of Jane Hay, 
daughter of Captain and Mrs. Sewell, Obit. 
27th June 1834, aged 10 months 22 days. 

K Sacred to the Memory of Master J. F. Browne, 
son of R. Browne, Esq. died 2d of June 1834, 
aged 1 year, 3 months and 5 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of James Barrett, 
late of Malden in Essex, who died June 2d, 1834, 
aged 34 years and 6 months. 

Mrs. J. Benjamine, Obit. 27th July 1834, 
yEt. 43 years, 6 months and 15 days. 

To the Memory of Allan Robertson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 9th December 1835, 
aged 32 years. 


In Memory of 
Charles C. Bolst, 

3d son of Wm. Henry and Mary Bolst, 
Obiit 11 April 1834, 
aged 6 years, 10 months and 27 days. 


To the Memory of 
Captain John Wilkinson Rowe, 

of the 31st Regiment N. I. 
who died on the 8tli May 1834, iEtatis 33. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Thomas Prinsep, 

Bengal Engineers, 
born on the 15th September 1800, 
killed by a fall from his horse 23d January 1830. 
This Tablet is added to record the fate 
of a younger brother Augustus Prinsep, 

B. C. S. who was born 31st March 1803, and 
died at sea of a consumption 10th October 1830. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Henry Chas. Jackson, 

Obiit 12 March 1830, iEtat 16 years and 8 months. 


In Memory of Mrs. Jane McKoy, 
who died July 3d 1830, aged 56 years. 
She was a kind and affectionate mother. 
This Monument is erected as a tribute of 
regard by her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs Wm. Kemp. 


In Memory of John N. Bird, 

Son of Charles Bird, Esq. of Philadelphia, 
who departed this life May 19th, 1830, 
aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain John Foote, 
formerly Assistant Marine Surveyor to the 
Hon. East India Company, who departed 
this life 7 July 1835, lelatis 70. 

a 2 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Susannah, 
the only beloved child of Horatio and 
Eliza Jones, who departed this life 28 
December 1829, aged 17 months and 2 days. 


Sacred to buried love ; 
to the Memory of his beloved and 
deeply lamented wife Emma, 
this Monument is dedicated by her husband, 
William Graham, M. D. She died the 14 
December 1829, aged 24 years. 


In remembrance of Robert Bathurst, Esq. 

late a Senior Merchant in the 
service of the Honorable East India Company, 
and Collector of Customs at Mirzapore, 
who departed this transitory life on the 3d 
day of November 1821 in the 67th year of his age, 
most sincerely and generally lamented. 

Of this excellent and generous man, 
whose virtues were too conspicuous to be 
enumerated, on this humble tablet 
(the offering of undissembled affection 
and esteem) suffice it to say, 
that his humanity and integrity knew no bounds. 
That he possessed all those rare qualities 
which constitute the gentleman, the man of 
refinement, learning and taste ; that he was ardent 
and unalterable in his friendship, and 
admired, honored and beloved 
by all who had the happiness of his aquaintance. 
This humble memorial is inscribed by 
one who was distinguished by Mr. 
Bathurst’s friendship and confidence, and 
who feels it the highest consolation 
on so melancholy an occasion to record 
the virtues of a man to whom when alive, he 
is proud of saying, that his obligations 
were endless, and are not forgotten 
now that he is no more. 

Erected by William Hussey Webster field, 1824. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Patterson, M. D. 

Surgeon Bengal Establishment, who departed 
this life at Calcutta on the 9th Dec. 1829, 
aged 45 years. 

To the Memory of Jane Frances, 
the beloved child of Captain Warlow, Engineers, 
born 14th Dec. 1828, died 28th Dec. 1829. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Jones, 
who departed this life 
11th of November 1829, aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Hugh Inglis, Esq. 
youngest son of the late Francis Inglis, Esq. 
H. C. Civil Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 
born on the 18th August 1811, died on the 
9th November 1830. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection is 
inscribed by his brother and sisters. 


Sacred to the Memory of Francis Inglis, Esq. 
eldest son of the late Francis Inglis, Esq. 

H. C. Civil .Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 
Born on the 20th July 1798, 
died with his family by the wreck off the Sand -head 
of the ship in which they were coming 
to Calcutta, on the 17th June 1826. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection 
is inscribed by his brother and sisters. 


1 1G 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Caroline Rodrigues, 

eldest daughter of the late Francis Inglis, Esq. 
H. C. Civil Service, Fort Marlborough Estt. 
born on the 31st May 1796, died on the 
17th September 1829. 

This sincere tribute of esteem and affection 
is inscribed by her brother and sisters. 


To the Memory ofBenjamin Fergusson, Esq. 
who died 3d March 1824, aged 47 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Josepha, the wife of Simeon Henry Boileau, 
who departed this life on the 28th June 1829, 
aged 35 years. 

God rest her soul. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Fendall, Esq. 
member of the Supreme Council, Bengal, who 
departed this life November 10th, 1825, 
aged 63 years. 


Here lyeth the remains of 
Captain John Daniels, of the Country Service, 
who died 21st of March 1824, aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane, wife of 
M. Cockburn, 

Obit 12th January 1824, iEtat 27 years 
and 2 months. 


Also of her son Michael, 

Obit 18th July 1846, iEtat 26 years, 11 
months and 12 days. 

Here lyeth the body of Mr. George Hornett, 
who departed this life at the age of 45 years, 
on the 14th January A. D. 1824, 
most deeply lamented by his family. 


Sacred to the Memory of Colonel John Paton, 
Commissary General of the Bengal army, 
Obiit 16th of February 1824, aged 63 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Liouisa Georgiana, 
third daughter of Dr. R. M. M. Thomson, 
and Mary his wife, who died on the 8th October 
1826, aged 1 year, 7 months and 23 days. 

* ‘ Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 
them not, for of such is the kingdom of God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Clayton, 

died 1st April 1824, aged 42 years, 3 
months and 17 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Bentley, Esq. 
who departed this transitory life on the 
4th March 1824, 
in the 67th year of his age. 

This tablet has been placed by Mrs. Anne Bentley, 
as a tribute of affection 
to the Memory of the deceased 
John Bentley. 

who was distinguished during his life for many 
eminent virtues and for an active and 
intelligent mind, ennobled by a truly warm, 
generous, social, and sincere heart, which rendered 
him esteemed and respected in an extensive 
circle of society where his loss is 
sincerely regretted. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Alexander Bentley, 

the only son of John Bentley, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 22d November 1825, 
at Kedgeree, where his remains have been 
interred and a Monument erected by his disconso- 
late mother Mrs. Anne Bentley, who as an 
additional tribute of maternal affectionate regard 
for his memory, has placed this Tablet on this, 
his father’s, Monument. 


To the Memory of Caroline Bracken, 

the daughter of James and Susan Minchin. 
Obiit 13th September 1829, aged 18 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Moseley Thomas, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 20th July, 
in the year of our Lord 1829, aged 42 years 
6 months. A kind husband, an indulgent parent. 
His widow, Ann Trepaud Thomas, erected this 
Monument in grateful and tender 
remembrance of him. 


Frances, wife of John Middleton, Engineer, 
sleepeth here in Jesus, waiting for her final call. 
She exchanged mortality for life, September 
24th, 1829, aged 29 years. 

“ She being dead, yet speaketh.” 


Sacred to the Memory of the late 
James Mackintosh, Esq. 
born at Tain, N. B. 4th Sept. 1802, died at 
Calcutta 15th August 1829, 
aged 26 years, 11 months and 11 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs Mary Rowe, 
who departed this life on the 11th of Sept. 1829, 
aged 55 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain William Eastgate, 
who departed this life on the 19th July 1829, 
aged 38 years. 

This tribute of affection is inscribed by his 
afflicted widow, Lydia Eastgate. 


Sacred to the Memory of Sophia, 
wife of John Dowling, Esq. died 11th June 1829, 
aged 45 years, 4 mouths 15 days. 

Also to the Memory of John Bowling-, Esq. 
died 30th June 1829, aged 63 years and 1 month. 
“ What I say unto you, I say unto all, watch.” — 
Mark xiii. 37. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Gibb, Esq. 

Senior Member of the Medical Board of this 
Presidency, died the 4th of June 1829, 
aged 68 years. 

If a life of truth and benevolence afford an 
humble hope of acceptance by our God, let us 
forbear to mourn his flight to the throne of mercy. 

Love, gratitude and veneration embalm the 
memory of the good, and will preserve the name 
of Alexander Gibb, when this stone shall mingle 
with the dust it now protects. 






Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Patrick Robert Sinclair. II. C. Marine, 

who was drowned off Middle Point 19th of Aug. 
1832, aged 21 years, 8 months, 13 days. 




Sacred to the Memory of Captain J. P. Perry, 
late of H. M. 38th Regiment, who died on the 12tl 
April 1821, most deservedly regretted. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Thomas Alsop, an active Magistrate, 
and highly esteemed member of society, 
died 11th April 1824, aged 50 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Grace Metcalfe, 
wife of Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe of the Civil 
Service, and eldest daughter of the late 
Alexander Clark, ofRuthven, N. B. Born 10th 
July 1795, Obit. 14th April 1824. 

Sacred to the Memory ot William, 
son of William Paton, Esq. of the H. C. Civil 
Service, who departed this life on the 3d May 
A. D. 1824, aged 3 years, 8 months and 1 day. 
A most promising and engaging child ; the pride 
and the joy of his parents, who fondly, but 
Alas ! vainly hoped, that the sweet and fair blos- 
som would have timely ripened into fruit. 
Their sorrows and affliction may be unspeakable, 
yet softened and subdued by the conviction 
that their departed darling, is happy in 
the realms of bliss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Robertson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 20th April 1824, 
aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Penelope Katherine, 

the infant daughter of the Rev. Thomas Welby 
Northmore, and Katherine his wife, who died 
on the 25th day of January 1825, 
aged one month and 23 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George McGowan, Esq. 

Surgeon, who departed this life July 1st, 1824, 
aged 34 years. 

His attached friends have erected this Monument 
as a last tribute of respect and in testimony 
of their sincere regard and esteem. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut.-General Sir John Macdonald, K. C. B. 
who after an honorable and faithful service 
of more than half a century, died on the 
29th May 1824. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Peter Adolp Torckler, Esq. 
died 18th November 1824, aged 76 years, 
3 months and 25 days. 

Also to the Memory of 
Mathew Godfrey Torckler, Esq. 
died 7th December 1824, aged 17 years, 

2 months and 27 days. 


James Mare, Esq. 

eldest son of Doctor James Hare, died 20th May 
1824, aged 19 years and 8 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. "William Jennings, 

died 1st May 1824, aged 50 years. 


Master William R. Sansum, 
died 19th July 1824, aged 4 months 9 days. 


Mrs. E. Sansum, 

died 14th Nov. 1824, aged 16 years 10 months. 

M iss Anna Emelia Black, 

died 23d January 1832, aged 13 years, 

5 months, 5 days. 


Miss Sarah Jennett Black, 

died 8th Nov. 1832, aged 7 years and 11 months 
Erected by her mother Mrs. Sarah Black. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. James Black, Branch Pilot, 
who departed this life on the 21st July 
1842, aged 44, 

and his son-in-law, Mr. WTlliamlDuncan, son of 
the late Doctor Joseph Duncan, 45th Regt. 
who died at Gazeepore 28th June 1844, 
aged 25 years. 

Reader, pause and reflect for awhile, 

This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 

With sickness we were sore opprest 
Kind death has eas’d us, we lie here at rest. 

This tablet is erected in testimony of great affec- 
tion for her father and husband, by Louisa 
Matilda Duncan. 


Sacred to the Memory of Ann, 
the wife of Frs. Jas. L’Herondell, who departed 
this life 2d May 1824, aged 18 years and 
5 months. This Monument is erected to her Memo- 
ry as a token of regard by her afflicted husband. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Thomas Ifoung, (Senior Branch Pilot,) 
who departed this life on the 30th April 1824, 
aged 50 years. 

Here lies the tenderest husband, father, friend, 

His life with goodness mark’d ; with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm, Oh may his soul have rest 
And he who others bless’d, himself be bless’d. 

He gave to every Christian virtue scope, 

And what his practice was, is now his hope. 


In Memory of Julia Pauline, 

daughter of Mr. Joseph Young, died 17th July 
1841, aged 1 year, 4 months and 22 days. 

This lovely bud so young and fair, 

Called hence by early doom, 

Just came to shew, how sweet a flower, 

In paradise will bloom. 


In Memory of Joseph Henry 'Walter, 

son of Mr. Joseph Young, 
died 25th February 1844, aged 9 years, 

7 months and 8 days. 

Sweet child, and hast thou gone — for ever fled ! 
Low lies thy body in its grassy bed ; 

But thy freed soul, swift bends its flight thro’ air, 
Thy heavenly father’s gracious love to share. 

Weep not for me dear mother, for I am happy 
still, 

And murmur not at our great Father’s will ; 

Let not the blow your trust in Jesus, shake, 

Our Saviour gave and it is His to take. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. "William Wrainch, 

late keeper ot the Calcutta Jail, who departed 
this life on the 13th day of June in the 
year of our Lord 1824, aged 35 years, 

3 months and 6 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Anne Emily Jane 
the infant daughter of William Fairlie Clarke 
who departed this life in Calcutta the 9th of 
November 1828, aged 2 years 
2 months and 12 days. 


118 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


This Monument is erected in Memory of 

Edward Paglar, 

Commander of the ship “ Cashmere Merchant," 
by a friend, who, during a voyage from England 
to India in 1822, experienced his attentions, 
and esteemed his worth. Obit. 8th 
November 1828, iEtat. 35. 


Sacred to the remains of Edward Barnett, 
and erected by friends sincerely attached to him. 
He died November 12tli, 1828. 


In Memory of W. A. Livingston, Esq. 
senior partner of the Firm of Messrs. Tulloh & Co. 
who died at Calcutta on the 13 th day of Nov. 
1828, aged 29 years. 

This monument is erected by his 
friend, James Coull. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Matilda Emily Ann, 
wife of Lieut. -Col. J. A. Hodgson, Surveyor 
General of India, who departed this life on the 
28th Nov. 1828, aged 32 years. 

“ Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall 
see God. Blessed are the dead which die in 
the Lord, for they rest from their labours." 


In Memory of James Pulton, 
son of Capt. and Mrs. R. B. Fulton of the 
H. C. Bengal Artillery. Born the 24th January 
1824, died the 13th December 1828. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Hunter Clarke, 

the infant son of Samuel and Isabella Clarke, 
who died 17th January 1829, aged 3 years 
and 5 months, 

Sincerely regretted by all who knew him. 
Sweet flow’r, farewell ! too fair for earth ! 
Brief space to us thy charms were giv’n ; 
He who bestowed thee, knew thy worth, 
And took thee to himself in heav’n. 


To the Memory of Charles Frederick, 

son of Charles Bennett and Jane his wife ; 
died September 2d, 1828, aged 2 years, 

2 months and 23 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 


Sacred to the Memory of 
■William Oliphant, Esq. 

Captain of the Bengal Artillery, who died 27th 
August 1828, aged 38 years. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
mother and brothers. 


To the Memory of Maria Ellen, 
daughter of Capt. J. E. Debrett, born 20th Nov. 
1827, died 22d August 1828. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charlotte Bailey, 
died 8th Aug. 1828, aged 3 years, 

0 months and 22 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Henry Twentyman Esq. 
who died 20th April 1842, aged 48 years, 

5 months and 12 days. 

As sincerely regretted as he lived beloved 
and esteemed. These lines are inscribed by his 
afflicted widow as an humble tribute 
to departed worth. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Mary Twentyman, 

who departed this transitory life on the 10th Jan. 

A. D. 1834, aged 30 years. 

She was a virtuous wife, a tender mother, a pious 
Christian, and now it is hoped rests with the 
“ Spirits of the just made perfect.” 

Here lies also her infant daughter 
Elizabeth Sophia, 
died 6th of August 1828, aged 1 year, 

9 months and 15 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven." 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Watson, Esq. Indigo Planter, 
who departed this life on Sunday 
the 12th of October 1828, aged 45 years, 

9 months and 25 days. 

Long time with sickness I was sore oppress’d, 

My prayers were heard, God kindly gave me rest. 
He ever proved himself an honest and virtuous man,* 
A good husband, a most generous heart 
and a sincere friend. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
Blessed be the name of the Lord.” Amen. 
This monument has been erected by his much 
afflicted widow, Mary Watson, who after quitting 
this world hopes to be interred in the 
same grave with her husband. 

And also to the Memory of Mrs. Mary "Watson, 
who departed this life the 4th January 1832, 
aged 41 years, 5 months and 7 days. 
Lamented by her friends for her generosity, 
kindness of disposition and many good qualities. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Leigh Trattle Jacob, 

who departed this life on the 22nd June 1824, 
aged 24 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a dutiful son, 
and a sincere friend. 

This Monument is erected to his Memory by his 
much afflicted widow, Jane Jacob. 


In Memory of Wm. Moore Bolst, 

Infant son of Wm. Flenry and Mary Bolst. 
Obit. 14th July 1824, aged 6 months 18 days. 


In Memory of Georgiana Bolst, 

Infant daughter of Wm. Henry and Mary Bolst. 
Obit. 23rd August 1832, aged 1 year, 

3 months and 13 days. 


In Memory of Jas. Y. C. Bolst, 

4th son of William Henry and Mary Bolst. 
Obit. 10th April 1834, aged 5 years, 

5 months and 23 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Denman, Esq. 
Attorney at Law, and his two children, 
John and Ellen, May 1832. 


Sacred to the Memory of J. Draper, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 20tli July 1824, 
aged 50 years. 

Deeply regretted by his wife and children. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. J. F. Simpson, 
who departed this life on the 29th Sept. 1826, 
aged 20 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND, 


119 


■Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph Simpson, 
who departed this life on the 17th July 1824, 
aged 64 years. 

Dissolv’d in earth in sad remembrance end, 

The social ties of husband, father, friend ; 

Yet these surviv’d, shall truth preserve to fame 
The chaste memorial of an honest name, 

And to ages bear his worth approved 
Who died lamented as he lived beloved. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Simpson, 
who departed this life on the 22d Feb. 1844. 
This tablet is erected by her afflicted daughters, 
in Memory of an affectionate and much 
lamented parent. 


Sacred to the beloved Memory of 

Charles Herd, Esq. 

who departed this life on the 15th August, 1839, 
aged 48 years. 

How sweet to sleep where all is peace, 
Where sorrow cannot reach the breast ; 

And pain is lull’d to rest. 

Escap’d o’er fortune’s troubled wave, 

To anchor in the silent grave. 

This tablet is placed here by his much 
afflicted widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Margaret Middleton, 

who departed this life on the 25th Oct. 1840, 
aged 34 years. 

“ The righteous shall be had in everlasting re- 
membrance.” 

tlThis Monument, as a tribute of affection, is erect- 
ed by her disconsolate husband and children. 


In Memory ofEnsign Thomas Hutton, 
Bengal Native Infantry, Obit. 3rd Dec. 1824. 

iEtat xviii. And of his Nephew James, 
the son of George and J. E. Mackillop, Obit. 
16th July 1833, aged 11 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Eleanor Mary Margaret, 

beloved wife of Richard Williams Walters, 

H. C.’s Marine, who departed this life 
on the 7tli April 1836, aged 22 years, 
and 10 days. 

When sorrow weeps o’er virtue’s sacred dust 
Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 

• Such are the tears he sheds who mournful pays 
This last sad tribute of his love and praise ; 

Who mourns the best of wives and friends com- 
bined, 

Where female softness met a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not murmurs, weeps but not despairs ; 
Feels as a man, but as a Christian bears. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 
wife of Conrad Laine, who departed this life on 
the 25th July 1824, aged 27 years, 

2 months and 13 days. 

Also to Bridget, her affectionate sister, 
wife of J. W. Higgins, aged 31 years. 

They were lovely and pleasant in their lives and 
in their deaths they were not divided. 

Also in Memory of Conrad Laine, 
a man who died on the 10th of December 1831, 
at the Sandheads, on board the H. C. P. V. 

“ Sea Horse,” aged 47 years. 


To the Memory of P. G. M. Laine, 
who departed this life on the 11th April 1839, at 
Midnapore, aged 16 years, 7 months and 29 days. 
A fine promising lad nipped off in the 
prime of youth and just as he had commenced 
his career in life. 


Sacred to the Memory of Harriet, 
the beloved and affectionate wife of William 
Higgins, who departed this life on the 1st 
September 1824, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Edward Hall, 
who died on the 1st April 1835, aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Clialcraft, 

who died 1st September 1824, aged 21 years, 
5 months and 14 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Turner, 
died the 8th October 1824, aged 54 years. 
This Monument as a tribute of affection is erected 
by his disconsolate widow, Anna Turner. 

In Memory of Charles Knowles, 

third son of Charles Knowles Robison, one of the 
magistrates of Calcutta. Born 2d September 
1827, died 22d July 1828. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain James Bontein, 
of the 1st Regt. Light Cavalry, who died on the 
24th October 1828, aged 38 years. 

Never man died more regretted by his brother 
officers. — St. John c. xiv. 25, 26. 


M. S. 

Harriott Trevor Charlotte, 

the daughter of Adeline and James Pattle, 
Natal. March, Obit. June 1828. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Butterworth Baylei^, 

Infant son of Henry Vincent and Louisa Bayley, 
born and died at Calcutta 25th October 1839. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Butterworth Bayley, 

Infant son of Henry Vincent and Louisa Bayley, 
born the 27 th September and died the 2d of 
October 1841, aged 5 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of George Corrie, 
the beloved child of John and Maria Jackson, 
born on the 4th September 1839, departed this life 
on the 19th September 1841, aged 2 years 
and 15 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret, 
the infant child of John and Emily Craigie, taken 
from them the 2d of July 1828, aged 13 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Maria, 
wife of Theodore Dickens, who lies with two of 
their infant sons in this grave. She died on the 2d 
of October 1834, aged 31 years. Her husband 
outlives her ; he has one son left. His 
hope is that this parting is not for ever 

Sacred to the Memory of Edward Francis 
third son of Theodore and Maria Dickens, 
born 31st July, and died 2d August 1834, 
aged 2 days. 


. 


120 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Mills Thomas, 

46th liegt. N. Infantry, who departed this life on 
the 10th of May 1828, aged 44 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
'William Blizzard Smith, 

the son of Henry Smith, Esq. and Hester Bevis, 
his wife, of Camberwell Grove, Surry, 

Natal 18th April 1794, Obiit 10th J uly A. D. 1835. 

In Memory of "William Tate, Esq. 
Attorney at Law, died 19th May 1828, yEtat 35 
years and 3 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Susannah, 
died at Calcutta on the 31st May 1828, 
aged 8 months. 

Also of William Morley, 
died at Mymunsing on the 14th April 1822, 
aged 2 years and 3 months. 

Also of Elizabeth Anne, 
died at Barrackpore on the 17th April 1825, aged 
3 years and 1 1 months ; 
children of William Hallows Belli, Esq. and of 
Sarah, his wife. 

Forgive blest shades the tributary tear, 

That mourns your exit from a world like this ; 
Forgive the wish that would have kept ye here, 
And stay’d your progress to the seats of bliss. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Geraldina, 

the affectionate and beloved wife ofMathew 
Uvedale. Born the 7th of April 1807, and depart- 
ed this life on the 10th April 1828, aged 
21 years and 4 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Bachel G. Uvedale, 
who died the 7th of July 1828, aged 
6 months and 19 days. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Davis, 
wife oflsaac Davis, Hair Dresser, who died the 7th 
of June 1828, by a sudden attack of Cholera, 
at the early age of 31 years, leaving a disconsolate 
husband to lament her irreparable loss. 

Also in Memory of Mr. Isaac Davis, 
died 18th November 1836, aged 59 years. 


Mrs. Sooma, 

died 13th June 1825, aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory o f 
Joseph Watts, Esq. of Hourah, 
who departed this life 30th March 1828, 
aged 42 years and 10 months. 

This Monument is erected by his disconsolate 
widow, as a small tribute of respect to his Memory. 

“ An honest man is the noblest work of God.” 


George Twisden, died Dec. 9, 1020, 
aged 12 hours. 

Isabella Savigny, died July 13, 1824, 
aged 1 year 10 months. 

Frances Twisden, died July 25, 1824, 
aged 6 hours. 

Blanche Twisden, died June 4, 1827, 
aged 1 year 10 months. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me, for of 
such is the kingdom of heaven, and he took them 
up in his arms, put his hands upon them and 
blessed them.” — Mat. x. 14,15. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Lockhart, 
the second daughter of W. D. S. Smith and 
the beloved and affectionate wife of Frederick 
Paschoud, who departed this life the 8th of Aug. 
1825, aged 23 years and 3 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of the infant daughter of 
Frederick Paschoud, 

born the 6th May and died the 25th Aug. 1825. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Helen Paschoud, 
born the 23d October 1823, and died the 19th 
July 1824, aged 8 months and 26 days. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me and for- 
bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
heaven.” — Luke, Chap. 18. v. 16. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Talbot Shakespear, 

who died on Board the H. C. ship “Rose,” 
on the 12th April 1825. 

In testimony of their sincere regard for the 
sterling qualities which distinguished this lamented 
individual, his surviving friends have erected 
this Cenotaph, as a tribute of his worth and a 
memorial of their regret. 


To the Memory of Emily, wife of 
J. T. Shakespear, Esq. of the Bengal Civil Service, 
died 29th September 1824, aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Vaugulin, 
late Livery stable keeper of Sooterlcin Lane, 
who after a lingering and painful 
illness of nine months, which he bore with exem- 
plary patience, departed this life on the 13th 
December 1824, resting his hopes of a joyful re- 
surrection on the merits and mediation of his 
Redeemer, aged 49 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a loving father, 
and a sincere friend. In his public capacity 
he has done his duty and given every satisfaction 
upon all occasions. He was much esteemed and 
respected for his upright conduct, 
by all who knew him. A friend 
to all, and enemy to none. 

His early death involves in grief severe, 

A loving partner and ten children dear ; 

The former, while she mourns her widow’d fate 
Beholds the latter and laments their state. 

Too soon alas, deprived of their best earthly guide, 
Their hearts are torn with grief, which cannot soon 
subside. 

But tho’ with perils their conditions fraught, 

To rest on God their hearts were early taught ; 
And deeply as their loss they do deplore 
They trust for safety in His mercy’s store. 

Tho’ low in earth, his form ’s decayed 
My faithful husband, my belov’d is laid ; 
Constantly you kept a wife’s true heart 
To all but her as cold as now thou art. 

To name your tenderness ill befits her grief 
What was her bliss, can now give no relief. 

Your widow mourns, the rest let friendship tell ; 
Fame spread your worth, your wife she knew it well, 
This modest stone what few vain marbles can, 

May truly say, here lies an honest man. 

Language cannot adequately express the grief of 
the afflicted widow, who erected this monument as 
a small token of the deep and lasting regret 
of herself and numerous family. 














SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


121 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. W'illiam Bartholomew, 

died 16th Feb. 1819, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Col. John DeCourcy.ol the Bengal Army, 
who departed this life, 10th of December 
1824, aged 62 years. 

Saered to the Memory of Mrs. Amelia Courtez, 
who departed this life on the 27th March 1829, 
aged 16 years, 4 months and 23 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. V. Vaugulin, 
died 9th May 1834, aged 13 years, 

8 months and 19 days. 

Erected by her affectionate sister, E. S. Vaugulin. 

Sacred to the Memory of Gilson Howe, Esq. 
who died on the 3d December 1824, aged 52 years. 
“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
widow as a last tribute of respect to his 
lamented memory. 


To Emily, wife of 
Captain A. Horsburgh, B. N. I. 
and daughter of Charles Hodgkinson, who departed 
this life on the 3d June 1825, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Charles "Wilson, 

Assistant Commissary General on the Madras 
Establishment; Obiit 13th October 1824, 
iEtat 43 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry Gawen, 
i of Greenwich, in the county of Kent, died January 
17th 1834, aged 29 years and 2 months. 

An affectionate brother, a sincere friend, and a 
truly honest, upright man. He lived respected 
and died lamented by all who knew his worth. 

Sacred to the Memory of Maria Felicia, 
the beloved wife of Charles Been Boyce, who 
departed this life July 17th 1833, aged 29 years 
and 4 months. 

To a truly pure and virtuous mind, with a mild and 
amiable disposition she combined all the 
endearing qualities of a most affectionate, faithful 
wife, and a tender mother. 

Religious without ostentation, meek, artless and 
benevolent, “ each kindred virtue dwelt 
within her breast.” 

Beloved, best of wives, parallel’d by few, 

In meekness, goodness, tenderness, adieu ! 

Adieu, Maria, till the day more blest, 

When, if permitted, I with thee shall rest. 


Also to the Memory of Caroline Maria, 
daughter of the above, who died November 17th, 
1827, aged 1 year and 4 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Hornby Law, 
the effectionate daughter of 
M. Law, Esq. and Welhelmina, his wife, 
who departed this life on 11th May 1828, aged 19 
years twenty- six days. 

I o the Memory of Roger ^Vinter, Esq. 
Barrister at Law', 

who died on the 24th May 1828, aged 39 years. 

R 


Sacred to the Memory ot 
Miss Adaline Blunt, 

born 30th August 1834, died 1 6th February 1835. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me, 
and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom 
of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of H. Blundell, Esq. 
who died 1 1th June 1825, and of his wife, 

A. J. M. Blundell, 

who died 1st August 1826. 


This Monument is raised to the sacred Memory of 

Henry Webster, 

Attorney of the Court of King’s Bench at 
Westminster and of the Supreme 
Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, who 
departed this life on the 13th day of June 1825, 
aged thirty-three years, two months and two days. 

Here rest the mortal remains of 
Fances, wife of James Webster, 
who died June 7th 1825, aged 34 years. 

In death lamented as in life beloved, her sorrowing- 
husband inscribes this sad tribute 
of fond affection to the Memory of an amiable and 
virtuous wife. 


Here lies interred Charles Henry, 
the infant son of C. and E. Stuart, of Calcutta, 
born 8th July 1824, died 30th July 1825. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Col. H. R. Browne, H. M. 87th Regt. 
who departed this life on the 5th June 1825, 
aged 39 years. 

This tomb is erected by his brother officers as a 
sincere token of their esteem for his memory 
and deep regret at his loss. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charles “Wiltshire, 
died 25th April 1825, aged 46 years. 

Also of Susan his wife, died 3d November 1825, 
aged 38 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
a virtuous mother, 31st March 1825. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Beverell, Esq. 
who departed this life '2d January 1825, 
aged 30 years. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Thomas Sheppard, 

late Senior Branch Pilot in the Honorable Com- 
pany’s Bengal Marine Establishment, who de- 
parted this life on the 1st October 1825, 
aged 51 years and 10 months, 

Leaving a disconsolate widow and 6ve children to 
lament his irreparable loss, and by whom this 
Monument is erected in testimony 
of their affection. 

Why on this mouldering tomb express his praise, 
Whose name can build what time can ne’er erase. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas "William King-, 

(Merchant and Accountant,) who departed this 
life at Calcutta on the 9th day of March 
A. D. 1825, deeply lamented by his family and 
friends, aged 46 years. 




122 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 




Sacred to the Memory of Henry Manning, Esq. 
of the II. C. Civil Service, who departed this 
life 22d of August 1825, at the early age of 27 
years and four months, leaving a disconsolate 
wife, who erects this Monument as a small mark 
of her unalterable affection, and a tribute of 
grateful remembrance to her ever beloved and 
much lamented husband. 


Sacred to the Memory of T. C. FitzGerald, 
Obit. 7th Sept. 1825, iEtat 30 years. 

Ah ! in this silent mansion of the dead 
The relics of my much lov’d Tom is laid ; 
Sleep dear departed worth in hopeful bliss, 
Till trump seraphic calls to endless peace. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Anne Lindsey Speed, 

who was born on the 17th Oct. 1823, and died 
on the 25th August 1825, aged 1 year, 

10 months and 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of D. W. FI. Speed, 
who departed this life on the 4th June 1841, 
aged 50 years and 18 days. 

In life beloved, in death lamented, this tomb is 
erected by his affectionate widow. 


Here lies also the body of 
Grace Lindsay Speed, 
freed from ail her worldly care and sorrows, 
died on the 17th of April 1844, aged 55 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Edwards, 
the affectionate wife of William Thacker, Esq. 
Surgeon, who departed this life 19th 
August 1S25, aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Kill, 
of the H. C. Marine, who departed this life 
on the 28th June 1825, aged 64 years. 


In Memory of Louisa, 

wife of G. Dick, died 12th Nov. 1845, /Etat 31. 
Also Frances, only daughter ot Jos. Dick, 
died 17th April 1842, age 29 years ; 
and Geo. Ward Dick, son of Geo. and Louisa 
Dick, died 4th April 1843, aged 19 months 
and 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
two beloved infants, children of Lieut. -Colonel 
Bryant, and Mary Anna his wife. Edward, 
who died the 12th of June 1825, aged one month. 

And Mary Anna. 

who died the 15th of August 1825, aged 
1 year, 10 months and 5 days. 

Also a third beloved infant, Louisa Cadogan, 
who died on the 7th of Oct. 1829, aged 6 months 
and 20 days. 


Major William Kiatfc, 
late Secretary to Government in the Military- 
Department, died the 15th June 1825, 
aged 44 years. 

This Monument is erected by some of his oldest 
and most intimate friends in testimony of the 
sincere respect and esteem entertained by them 
for his character in public and private life, as 
an officer and a gentleman. 


Tn Memory of John, 

infant son of Mr. John Harris, and Caroline his 
wife, died 13th Oct. 1834, aged 3 months 
and 5 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Karris, 
wife of Mr. John Harris, 3d daughter of the late 
Henry Hall, Esq. of Carlisle, who died the 
2 2d June 1825, sincerely regretted, aged 22 years 
3 months and 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Anne Lawrenson, 

deceased 30th June 1825, aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Dick, Esq. 
of the H. C. Bengal Civil Service, born August 
18, 1797, died July 20, 1825, aged 27. 

Thy brother, John, erects this stone 
O’er thy untimely grave, 

He came unnoticed and alone 
Thy bed with tears to lave. 

No more he’ll see thy noble form 
Nor hear thy voice of mirth : 

No more will beat thy heart so warm, 

Now still and cold as earth. 

But trusts thy spirit lives above, 

Which Jesus died to save, 

Thro’ whose atoning blood and love 
We all must pardon crave. 

Thou wert of five the youngest, John, 

Yet first on death’s decree, 

Now 1 am the youngest thou art gone 
Yet first may follow thee. — A bercromby. 


In Memory of Mr. Josh. Dick, 
who died 26th August 1825, aged 40 years. 

Also his son Mr. T. O. Dick, 
who died at Bankipore, 1st October 1837, 
aged 29 years and 8 months. 


Also to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Kill Karris, 

who departed this life 13th January 1839, 
aged 14 years, 10 months and 23 days. 


Underneath are the remains of Miss Jane Slinger, 
who departed this life 16th Oct. 1834, 
aged 23 years. 

Erected to her Memory by a sincere friend. 


In Memory of the Rev. J. Lawson, 
Pastor of the Baptist Church, Circular Road, 
who died Oct. 22d, 1825, aged 38 years. 
His life was useful and his death triumphant. 


Also Mary Butterworth Lawson, 

who died Dec. 2d, 1825, aged 14 years. 
“ Be ye also ready.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Bachel Harriet, 
widow of the late Henry William Money of the 
LL C. Civil Service, who departed this life on 
the 1st January 1826, aged 28 years. 

Also to the Memory oi her infant daughter Emily 
who died on the 20th October 1825 at the * 
age of 1 year and 6 months. 




Sacred to the Memory of Julia, daughter of 
WiHiam Henry Oakes, aged 4 months and 27 days. 




SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


123 


Sacred to the Memory of "Win. Jackson, Esq. 
Attorney at Law, who departed this life at 
Budge Budge on the 14th December 
1825, aged 21 years. 

Also to the Memory of his brother 
Captain Samuel Jackson, of the Madras Army, 
who died at sea near Aleppey 
in April 1826, aged 27 years, 

The sons of the late John Jackson, Esq. and 
nephews of Randle Jackson, Esq. Barrister 
at Law, and a Bencher of the Hon. 

Society of the Middle Temple. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Patrick Dudgeon, of the 14th Regt. N. I. 
Commanding Sylhet Local Battalion, 
died 6th October 1825, aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Lieut. -Col. IMf . Bucke, 
who departed this life on the 8th Sept. 

1825, aged 43 years, 

Having borne a share in the conquest of Aracan, 
he fell a victim to its baneful climate and 
to the ardent zeal for his profession which 
distinguished him through life. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
M rs. Mary Jane Mansfield, 

died 10th April 1826, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Miss Eraraa Beghie, 
who died 8th September 1825, aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles James Fox, Esq. 
late of Calcutta, Merchant, who departed this life 
on the 23d Sept. 1825, aged 34 years. 

This Monument is erected by his brother as a last 
tribute to his worth. 


Sacred to the Memory of 'W'illiam Fox, Esq. 
late of Calcutta, who departed this life 
on the 19th September 1833, 
aged 34 years and 6 months. 

This Monument is erected by his beloved wife 
as a memorial of her affection. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Brae, Esq. 
late of Ruttonpore, Kisenaghur, died 20th 
September 1825, aged 69 years. 

“ Death cannot make his soul afraid, 

“ Whose God is with him there ; 

“ Soft is the passage through the shade, 

“ And all the prospect fair.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Emma, 
daughter of Lieut. -Col. Humfrays of the 
Bengal Engineers, and wife of Major William 
Stuart Beatson, Deputy Adjutant General, 
who died on the 16th of September 1825, 
ten days after the birth of her fourth child, in 
the 29th year of her age. 

Her virtues and her talents, her highly cultivated 
mind ; her playful liveliness of temper and the 
generous warmth of her disposition, 
endeared her to her friends while her devoted 
attachment as a daughter, sister, wife and mother, 
made her the comfort and delight of her (now 
desolate) husband and of those near relations 
who lament her untimely death, but with 
the humble hope of rejoining her hereafter. 

R 2 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry, 
the beloved son of Henry and Ellen Eliza Glance, 
who departed this life 12th Dec. 1837, aged 
8 years, 11 months and 29 days. 


To the Memory of Margaret, 
the affectionate wife of E. S. Ellis, 
died Sept. 27th 1826, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Benjamin Hardtman, Esq. 
died 20th January 1826, aged 38 years. 


Here rest the mortal remain-* of Henrietta, 
wife of William Tomkyns, and eldest daughter of 
W. D. S. Smith, died 7th January 1826, 
aged 24 years, 7 months and 15 days. 

This Monument is erected to the Memory of 
Colonel George ‘William Hessing, 
eldest son of the late Colonel John llessing, who 
departed this life 6th January A. D. 1826, 
aged 44 years, deservedly lamented by all who had 
the happiness of his acquaintance, and 
more immediately by his family to whom he was 
an affectionate parent and sincere friend. 

“ Blessed are the meek in spirit for they shall 
see God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut Charles Smith, of the 27th Regt, N. I. 
died 19th February 1826, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Ann Eliza Barrett, 
who departed this life on the 1st day of January 
1826, aged 6 years and 1 month. 

This Monument is erected by her afflicted parents 
as a mark of their affection for her many 
amiable aad endearing qualities. 

Sleep soft in dust, await th’ Almighty’s will, 

Then rise unchanged and be an angel still. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charlotte Mary, 
the beloved wife of Fry Magniac, Esq. 
who departed this life in Calcutta on the 1st of 
November 1825, aged 28 years, 3 months 
and 12 days, deeply regretted. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth and that he 
shall stand at the latter day upon the earth, and 
though after my skin, worms destroy this body, 
yet in my flesh shalll see God.” — Job xix. 25, 26. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Rycroft Best, H. C. Civil Service, 
who departed this life 23d December 1829, aged 
29 years and 7 months. 

“ An honest man is the noblest work of God.” 
Also to the Memory of Georgiaua Maria, 
the infant daughter of John Rycroft and Georgiana 
Best, who died on the 28th February 1826, 
aged 7 months and 22 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. James Depstell, of the H. C. Marine, 
died 23d November 1825, aged 63 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Augustus Henry Saunders, 
born 25th April and died 11th December 1825, 
aged 7 months and 16 days. 


124 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Jane Eliza Maclean, 

who departed this life 27th February 1826. 
This amiable young lady had only arrived the short 
space of 5 months and 1 1 days from 
England, when she fell a victim to one of the fatal 
diseases incident to the climate of India. 

She was in life respected and beloved for her many 
excellent qualities ; so in death she is deeply 
lamented by her parents, relatives and friends, who 
will ever bewail her irreparable loss. 

Aged 17 years, 4 months and 20 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of "W. K. Jackson, Esq. 
Obiit 4th December 1825, 2Etat 69 years, 

8 months and 5 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. William Bason, Branch Pilot, 
died 1 6th December 1825, aged 60 years. 


Mary Bason, relict of the late W. Bason, 
died 23d October 1837, aged 65 years. 


Helen Bason, wife of T. Bason, died 29th May 
1837, aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. 'William Stennard Skitter, 

who departed this life 23d May 1827, aged41 years, 
8 months and 23 days. 


To the Memory of Margaret Newton, 
of Althorp in Northamptonshire, wife of Charles 
Newton, an Assistant Surgeon of this Presidency, 
who died at Seetapore in the kingdom of Oude, 
on the 24th August 1834, and was interred 
here on the 7th April 1836, 

Also Elizabeth Margaret ^rt^ard Newton, 

the infant daughter of the above, who died 
on the 22d March 1836, 
aged 21 months and 25 days. 

This last tribute of affection was raised by the 
bereaved and disconsolate husbaiufand father. 


"William Liow Cantor, 

died 4th April 1836, aged 6 months and 1 day. 


Sacred to the Memory of J. C. Watson, Esq. 
of Gazeepore, Merchant, died 9th May 
1827, aged 42 years. 

A tender and kind husband, an affectionate 
father and a sincere friend. 

This monument is erected by his afflicted widow. 


Beneath this stone lie the remains of Eliza, 
the affectionate wife of W. G. Grieff, 
died in childbed 1st Augt. 1827, 
aged 22 years, 7 months and 26 days 

Rest Eliza dear, rest in peace, 

Secure from vanity and noise, 

For here thy earthly sorrows cease 
From hence commence thy heav'nly joys. 
Short was thy span — ’tis past — ’tis gone ; 
Early thou reach’d ’st the appointed goal, 
Freed from its clogs and upwards flown 
Angels received thy spotless soul. 

This Monument an afflicted husband rears, 
To prove his love and record his tears. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Anna Fanny Mary, 

the beloved daughter of Thomas Reid and Helen 
Eliza Davidson, born the 25th August 
1827, died the 10th of November 1843. 


Sacred to the Memory of Fnnny Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Reid and Helen 
Eliza Davidson, Obit 15th April 1827, 
aged 2 years, 8 months and 13 days. 

“ Let them come unto me and forbid them not 
for of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. A. Vanristell, 
who departed this life 16th July 1827, 
aged 15 years, 3 months and 16 days. 


Under this tomb are buried the remains of 
a beloved child, Fanny Snedden, 
whose parents erect this Monument to mark 
the spot Sacred to their infant’s Memory. 
Into God’s care they resign their babe, who was 
born 15th October 1824, died 7th May 1827, 
aged 2 years, 6 months and 23 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Elizabeth Mary Henderson. 

infant daughter of Lieut. H. B. Henderson, 
died 2d April 1824, iEtat 11 months 27 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain 'William Kinsey, 

who departed this life 20th November 1823, 
aged 44 years. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate wife. 
“ Behold the Lord taketh away, who can hinder 
him ? who will say unto him what doest thou ?” 


This last and sorrowful tribute marks the grave of 
Mrs. Margaret Kinsey, 
who (if those that knew her best can judge) 
resigned her spirit to God on December the 6th 
1813, aged 21 years and 10 months. 


The infant daughter of 
William and Mary Anne Kinsey, 


Charles Baset Jones, died April 3rd 1819. 


Sacred to the Memory of Capt. George Brown, 
late commander of the ship “ Robarts,” and 
formerly of the H. C. Service, who departed this 
life 6th April 1820, aged 36 years. 


I o the Memory of Mr. Robert Bancroft, 
who departed this life on the 16th Sept. 

1810, aged 58 years. 

He was a most worthy and honest man. 

Man on this stage is a frail imperfect creature, 
but an honest man is the noblest work of nature. 


To the Memory of Mrs Harriot Chalke, 
who departed this life, Dec. 23d, 1809, 
aged 1 7 years ; 
and Mr. John Chalke, 
who departed this life, July 19th, 1819, 
aged 35 years 2 months. 


125 


SOUTH PARK STREET 

Sacred to the Memory of a virtuous and affec- 
tionate wife, a fond and tender mother, 

Mrs. Henry Jas. Chalke, 
who died the 25th July 1817, aged 
23 years and 9 months. 

She left the world without a tear, 

Save for her husband and children dear ; 

To heal their sorrows, O Lord, descend 
And to them ever prove a friend. 

In Memory of Eliza Sarah, 
the affectionate child of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
Chalke, died 18th April 1845, 
aged 5 years and 22 days. 

And of Sophia Caroline, 

who died 30th May 1846, aged 4 years 
and 20 days. 

Hope looks beyond the bounds of time, 

When what we now deplore, 

Shall rise in full immortal prime, 

And bloom to fade no more. 

Then cease fond nature — cease thy tears, 
Religion points on high, 

There everlasting spring appears, 

And joys which cannot die. 


Sacred to tbe Memory of Mr. George Peters, 
who departed this life 10th October 1814, in the 
44th year of his age. 


Near this spot lie the remains of 
James Rayner Siddons, 
born 24th April, died 19th August 1818. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Ann Broders, 
The wife of Mr. James Broders, 
who departed this life 18th May 1822, aged 19 
years and 3 months. 

Of excellence a pattern here is laid ; 

Nature’s great debt in humble hope she paid. 

By nature form’d for every social part, 

Mild were her manners and sincere her heart. 


Also Lydia Broders, 

daughter of Mr. James Broders, a most dutiful and 
affectionate child, aged 10 years and 3 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of George Duckett, 
who departed this life on the 13th February 1817, 
in the 34th year of his age, much regretted. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Hall, 
who departed this life 17th January 1817, aged 54 
years and 10 months. 

“ Behold and see if there be any sorrow like unto 
my sorrow. — Sam. 1 chap. 12 verse.” 
Inscribed by her affectionate children, as their last 
sad tribute, Charles and Celia Brodie. 


M. S. 

Hannae Burton, 

J. C. Burton, Mereatoris, Conjugis dilectae, 

Quae dum vari is vitae officus Funge batar egre- 
gie Filia uxor matrona mater familias 
Pia tenara casta fruge ante diem eheu abrepta 
Propinquis cognatis amicis Desiderium at conjugi 
Tam gravi domus clade Saucio solo 
perpetuamsollicitu dinem Atque mae roremreliquit. 
Annos Natae xxxii. Obt. Decembri 26, 1816. 


BURIAL GROUND. 

J. h. MacWhirter, Obiit 12 October 1816, 
JE t. 4 years and 7 months. 

Miss J. R. MacWhirter, 

Obt. 11th September 1820, 2Et. 1 year and 
11 months. 


And Miss F. M. MacWTiirter, 

Obt. 12th September 1820, yEt. 3 years. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Ed. Henry Molony, 
born 21st August 1820, died 12th 
October 1821. 


To the Memory of 
Master James Lidiard, 

Son of Richard Lidiard, Indigo Planter, 
who departed this life on the 2d day of Sept. 
1826, aged 14 years and 10 days. 

From all the varied ills below 
Safe doth my Jimmy sleep ; 

His little heart no pangs doth know, 

His eyes no more shall weep. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 

Here lie the remains of 
Charles Hodgkinson and Anne Eliza, 
children of William and Anne Ryland. 
Charles died 16th June 1834, aged 1 year, 

5 months 11 days. 

Anne died the 13th July 1834, aged 3 years, 

6 months 3 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Hollow, 
the youngest daughter of the late 
Dr. Hem-y Buckley, of London, the beloved wife of 
Mr. Robert Hollow. Born on Monday the 19th 
December 1805, died on Sunday the 19th 
September 1830, aged 24 years, 9 
months and 2 days. 

Excellantissimo Sexus. 

As a record of conjugal affection, this Monument 
is erected by her grateful and 
afflicted husband. 

O ! early snacth’d from all w T ho held her dear, 

As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her’s to earth is seldom giv’n, 

Too good to dwell with us, she’s gone to Heav’n. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. Edward Scott, of H. lVl. 59th Regt. 
who died the 26th December 1815, aged 25 years. 
This Monument is erected by his brother 
officers as a mark of their esteem. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Chastenay, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Service, and Private Secretary 
to the Marquis of Hastings, 

Governor General of India. Obiit 27th May 1822, 
An. JEt&t xxviii. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward Molony, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Service, and Deputy Secretary 
to Government in the Territorial department, 
Obiit xviii. January 1830, An. AEtat xxxvi. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Jane Edmund, 
who departed this life 1st Sept. 1822, aged 2 
years and 9 months. 


126 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of T. M. Farquhar, Esq. 
died 14th July 1831, aged 25 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Nancy Gonsalves, 
born the 1st Nov. 1799, died the 3d Oct. 1821, 
on giving birth to her firstborn son, who also 
reposes on her side, aged 21 years, 

11 months and 3 days. 

This Monument is erected to departed virtue by 
her husband Victoriano Gonsalves. 


Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth, 
the wife of Samuel Smith, who departed this life 
at Calcutta on the 18th December 1821, 
aged 24 years. 

Resigned in all things to the will of the Almighty, 
Her afflicted husband bows submissive to the 
decree that has deprived him of the mother of his 
infant daughter, an affectionate wife, and an 
amiable companion, after a short but happy union 
of twenty months. 


Here also lie interred the infant remains of 
Eydia Marianne Snow Strettell, 

born the 19th August 1822, died the 
28th November 1822. 

Lovely in death so on the verdant plain, 

Falls the fair flower overcharged with rain ; 
Thus early transcient pure as snow new driv’n, 
She sparkled, was exhal’d, and went to Heav’n. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Matthew Strettell, 

a lovely, interesting and beloved child, born the 
17th July 1819, died the 4th Oct. 1822. 

This Monument of affection is raised by his 
afflicted and bereaved parents. 

Beneath this rugged Monument, 

There sleeps the sweetest innocent 
That e’er with tender passions warm’d 
A parent’s heart, or smiling charm’d. 

His wit mature, his rosy cheeks, 

As the op’ning blossoms gay, 

Or the star when morning breaks ; 

Heaven saw, and snatch’d his soul away 
Amidst its cherub forms to shine 
Who was like them so lovely and divine. 


Died of fever, 2d October 1835, 

Frederick, 

son of the late Rev. John W. Astley, late Vicar 

of Quinington, Gloucestershire, aged 16 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. P. Lowder, 
who died on the 17th March 1837, aged 25 years, 
10 months and 27 days. 

Afflictions sore long time I bore, 

Which wore my strength away, 

And made me long for endless rest 
That never will decay. 

This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
husband, Thomas Lowder, Engineer. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Rose Curreu, 
died 27th July 1826, aged 32 years. 

Erected by her affectionate daughter, 

Miss E. P. Curreu. 


Sacred to the Memory of Issabella, 
wife of Mr. James Walters of Lucknow, 
died 15th Sept. 1825, aged 41 years. 

She lived excellent in every relation of private life, 
and died a pious Christian. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
the lale Samuel Evans, 
a native of Wales, who departed this life on the 
10th February 1817, aged 48 years. 

Bv nature open, liberal and humane, but 
misfortune overtook him in his latt er age. 
Isaiah liv. Ch. 8. 

“ In a little wrath I hid my face from thee, but 
with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on 
thee, saith the Lord my Redeemer.” 

O may the Almighty God your soul rest in peace, 
For here thy earthly cares and troubles cease. 
This is erected in tribute by his affectionate and 
disconsolate widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Edward Sattarth waite, 

late Midshipman Ship “ Lady Campbell,” 
Capt. G. Betham, died 26th September 1825, 
aged 17 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Scottock, 
of H. M. 46th Regt. who departed this life on the 
28th October 1826, aged 50 years. 

This tomb is erected by her son, Samuel Scottock, 
Serjt. H. M. 46th Regt. 


In Memory of Wm. St. John, 

infant son of Jno. and Emily Becher, died 30th 
January 1836, aged 3 months 11 days. 


Cut down like a flower. 

“ In the midst of life we are in death.” 
Sacred to the Memory of Charlotte Becher, 
who departed this life on the 14th day of 
July A. D. 1818, at the early age of 23 years. 

Ye, who here tread the gay fantastic 
round of pleasures dear delights, one moment 
pause. Behold the record of the young, the 
gay, the innocent, low laid in kindred dust, 
and Oh ! reflect how short, how frail, 
the thread of human life ! And learn to live that 
you may die to God. 


Henry Cox, died on the 8th Feb. 1816. 
Aged 1 year, 7 months and 13 days. 
Erected by Ann W. B. Cox. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Collett, 
the eldest daughter of Mr. Moran, 
who died on the 22d Dec. 1822, aged 35 years. 

Also in Memory of Edward Moran, Esq. 

Deputy Commissary of Ordnance, 
who departed this life on the 12th July 1827, 
in the 71st year of his age, deeply lamented. 


In Memory of Mr. George Crowe, 
died 21st December 1826, 
aged 37 years, 7 months and 21 days. 
This Monument is erected as a tribute of 
affection to the best of fathers, 
by his dutiful son, J. G. Crowe. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Eetitia Butler, 
relict of Mr. George Crowe, who departed 
this life 18th June 1837, 
aged 43 years, 1 month and 9 days. 

This simple tablet is raised to the Memory of 
one of the best and fondest of mothers, by her 
bereaved daughter, A. S. Crowe. 


127 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Tn Memory of Mr. D. I*. Thornton, 
who died 29th Augt. 1822, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Henrietta Lavinia, 
daughter of II. Adams, Esq. who departed 
this life on the 5th August 1843, 
aged 8 months and 29 days. 

Also to the Memory of Henry Adams, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 17th May 1845, 
aged 33 years, 3 months and 19 days. 

Also to the Memory of Mary Harriet, 
daughter of the late H. Adams, Esq. died 25th 
'May 1846, aged 4 years, 7 months and 29 days. 

Whate’er we fondly call our own 
Belongs to Heav’n’s great Lord ; 

The blessings lent us for a day 
Are soon to be restored. 

’Tis God that lifts our comforts high, 

Or sinks them in the grave ; 

He gives, and when he takes away, 

He takes but what he gave. 

Then ever blessed be his name, 

His goodness swell’d our store ; 

His justice but resumes its own, 

’Tis ours still to adore. 


Here lies deposited the mortal remains of 
Adeline Sarah, the infant daughter of 
T. Steers, Esq. of the Native Hospital, 
who departed this life on the 3d May 1821, 
aged 2 years, 4 months and 18 days. 

’Tis not for her but for yourselves ye mourn ; 
To happier regions is the spirit fled ; 

Nor ought of her, but mould’ring clay is dead ; 
In heaven she lives, 

Where you will one day meet, 

And joy eternal make your bliss complete. 

Tn Memory of 'William. Mackintosh, 

died 13th October 1825, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
T. J. L’Herondell, Esq. 
who departed this life Feb. 15th 1831, 
aged 46 years. 

This Monument is erected as a token of 
affection, by his two afflicted sons, 

F. M. L. and L. J. L. 


To the Memory of Lieut. S. F. Ward, 
of H. M. 53d Regt. who died 4th September 
1816, aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Robert Samuel Feilder, 
who departed this life 3d July 1826, 
aged 31 years, 1 month and 13 days. 
Erected by his brother, James 
Feilder, Branch Pilot. 


Mrs. J. Sparrow, aged 45 years, 1835. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sub-Conductor Charles Newton, 
who departed this life the 28th July 1822, 
aged 22 years, 

Leaving a disconsolate widow and one child 
to deplore his loss. This tomb is erected by his 
beloved wife, Susanna Newton. 


Sacred to the Memory ot Charles Saunders, F.sq. 
third officer of the PI. C. Ship “ Minerva, 
who died the 8th Dec. 1815, aged 25 years. 
Erected as a mark of esteem by his brother officers. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Hawkins, 
who departed this life 1st August 1816, 
aged 47 years. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth.” 


Here lies the infant son of 
Mr. Thomas Burt, 
born and died 8th November 1831. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Johnson, 
(late Proprietor of the Star Press,) who departed 
this life on the 11th July 1817, aged 43 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. A.. 23. Johnson, 
relict of the late Mr. John Johnson, of the 
“ Star Press,” who died on the 18th August 1819, 
aged 38 years. 


Beneath are deposited the mortal remains of 
Major General John Garstin, 

of the Corps of Engineers, who departed this life 
in the sixty-fourth year of his age, on the 
16th February 1820, 

Having established to his own memory in an 
honorable reputation justly acquired by a long and 
meritorious discharge of every duty, a 
more commemorative Monument than this tablet, 
which the affection of his children have 
inscribed in remembrance of his worth and in 
testimony of their gratitude and deep affection. 

The deceased was an officer, brave, 
zealous and able ; as a son, husband and father 
invariably kind and affectionate ; as a man 
distinguished by inflexible integrity, and ever 
ready beneficence. 


This edifice is erected by a sorrowful son 
to the affectionate memory of his mother, 

Mrs. Amelia Cooper, 
who departed this life the 3d September 1822, 
aged 41 years. 

Our hearts are fastened to this world 
By strong and endless ties, 

While every sorrow cuts a string, 

And urges us to rise. 

To the Memory of Master Thos. "W. Holst, 
died 29th July 1818, aged 15 years, 3 months and 
14 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. Patrick Panton, 12th Regt. N. I. 
who died 25th January 1813, aged 26 years. 
This tomb is erected as a testimony of 
affectionate regard and esteem by his 
brother, W. Panton. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Crichton, 
who died on the 27th April 1819, aged 70 years. 

To the Memory of Caroline Sophia, 

the beloved wife of Charles Cowles, who died 
June 5th 1833, aged 33 years. 

Also Caroline Isabella Cowles, 

their daughter, who died December 1st, 1826, 
aged 1 year, 1 month, 24 days. 


128 


•SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Beneath are deposited the remains of 
Lieut. -Colonel Valentine Blacker, 
Companion of the Bath ; of the Light Cavalry 
on the establishment of Fort Saint George. 
During ten years, Quarter Master General of the 
Madras Army, 

and subsequently Surveyor General of India. Obt. 
iv. February MDCCCXXVI. yEt. xl. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Blacker was, an Officer 
distinguished alike for professional ability, for 
public zeal, for private worth, and for 
manliness of character. In testimony thereof his 
friends and comrades have caused this Monument 
to be erected to his memory. 

To the Memory of Maria Amy Debrett, 

born 13th April 1795, died 25th June 1826. 
This stone is erected by her brother. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Rodrigues, 
the wife of Mr. Anthony Rodrigues, and daughter 
of the late Andrew Perroux, Esq. This 
amiable and virtuous lady departed this life on 
Monday the 1st May 1826, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Agnes, the beloved wife of 
Lieut. -Colonel C. S. Fagan, who departed this life 
on the 19th April 1826, aged 36 years. 

Than whom, for the exemplary discharge of her 
duties as a wife and a mother, no woman was ever 
more eminently distinguished. In every 
other endearing relation of life, she was beloved 
and respected. 


The remains of the infant son of 

Lieut. J. A. Fairhead, 28th N. I. 1827. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Robert Charles Stevenson, 

of FI. M. 59th Regiment, who departed this life 
at Calcutta, on the 4th December 1826, aged 40 
years, leaving a widow and five helpless children 
to deplore the loss of the best of husbands 
and fathers. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain A. Stewart, 28th Regiment N. T. 
died 28th August 1826, aged 42 years. 


Rodney Cotterell Statham, 

died 5th August 1826, aged 56 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Francis St. George Farquharson, Esq. 
who departed this life 4th May 1826, 
aged 26 years. 

This Monument was erected by his four brothers, 
resident in India, as a mark of their love and 
esteem for his person and regret for his loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Blaney, 
who departed this life at Calcutta on the 21st of 
July 1827, on Saturday, most deeply and 
deservedly regretted by a numerous circle 
of friends, aged 52 years, 7 months 
and 15 days. 


7’o the Memory of Poyntz Stewart, Esq. M. D. 
died 16th July 1827, aged 27 years 10 months. 
And of his son William H. C. Stewart, died 
26th July 1827, aged 2 years 9 months. 


To the Memory of Thomas Earnest Driver, 

died 4th June 1827, aged 14 years 1 month. 


In Memory of Thomas Thomson, Esq. 
Indigo Planter, who departed this life 19th July 
A. D. 1827, aged 23 years, 2 month sand 3 days. 
As a token of her affection, this Monument is 
erected by his disconsolate widow. 

“ He that believeth in me, though he were dead, 
yet shall he live.” 

To the Memory of Matilda, 
the affectionate wife of Charles Mackenzie, Esq. 
died Sept. 30th 1827, aged 39. 


In Memory of Thomas Edward, 

son of Major Thomas and Louisa Maddock, 
born 28th June 1826, died 8th August 1327. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

John Burton Long, Esq. 
who died 31st August 1827, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Freer Falconer, 

son of the late Alexander Falconer, Esq. of Bel- 
nabarry, who died at Calcutta on the 29th 
October 1827, aged 14 months. 


To the Memory of Mary, 
wife of Captain John Hullock, died on the 9th 
April 1836, aged 32 years. 

In the bitterness of unutterable sorrow, this 
Monument is erected by her fondly attached 
husband and her five darling children, as a last 
mournful tribute of their most affectionate 
and just veneration for her beloved Memory. 

“ But we shall go to her.” 

Also of Captain John Luscombe VtTood, 

and his wife and child, who perished in command 
of the “ Quebec Trader,” in a tyfoon in the 
China Seas, in July 1835. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. Frederick Grote, 
of the Bengal Artillery, and Aide-de-Camp to the 
Governor General ; sixth son of George 
Grote, Esq. of Badgemore in Oxfordshire, who | 
departed this life April 21, 1828, aged 21 years. | 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Eliza Tosh, 
wife of J. Tosh, Esq. who departed this life 19 th 
Dec. 1827, aged 21 years. 

Erected by her husband, James Tosh. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Wood, 

who died the 20th November 1827, aged 39 years i 
and 10 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Louisa, 
the. beloved daughter of George and Anne Chester, 
who departed this life on the 10th February 
1828, at the age of sixteen, 
deeply and deservedly lamented. 

That being the dispensation of him whose provid- 
ence are ever kind, and wise and just, has taken 
her early, not prematurely to himself. 

“ For of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” 


M. S. 

Thomas Pattle, 

Obit. iii. Aigust 1826, yEtat six. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


129 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane Nuthall, 
eldest daughter of Colonel John Nuthall, Bengal 
Light Cavalry, died 1st January 1827, 
aged 30 years. 


He is gone before. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Henry Blake Pridham, 

>who departed this transitory life on the 15th Oct. 
A. D. 1826, sincerely regretted by his circle 
of relatives and friends. Bom Nov. 21st, 1734, 
aged 31 years, 10 months and 25 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken 
away, blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Also George Hamilton Gray, 

the beloved child of George and Eliza Macferan, 
born 14th August 1840, Obit 5th May 1843. 

Sacred to the Memory of C. T. Evans, Esq, 
who departed this life on the 9th September 
1826, aged 49 years. 

This monument is erected by his affectionate 
and beloved wife. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth and that he 
will raise me up at the last day.” 


Sacred to the Memory 6f 
Susannah Bush Cotton, 

the beloved wife of Thomas Forrest Cotton, 
bom 21st August 1796, and died after giving 
birth to a stillborn babe, 14th March, 1827. 


■Sacred to the Memory of a dearly beloved son of 
J. M. and C. Heritage, 
who departed this life, 24th September 1826, 
aged 2 years, 9 months and 26 days. 

A child reposes underneath this sod, 

A child to mem’ry dear and dear to God ; 
Rejoice, yet shed the sympathetic tear, 

Henry Mathias Heritage lies buried here. 

i-Sacred to the Memory of Master James "William, 
■ son of J. M. and C. Heritage, died 8th August 
1827, aged 5 months and 4 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord. ’ ’ 


Also of Charles Edward, 

infant son of J. M. and C. Heritage, died 
11th March 1828, aged 1 month 25 days. 


And of John Francis, 

eldest son of J. M. and C. Heritage, 
who departed this life 20th October 1832, 
aged 14 years and 9 months. 

God forbid his longer stay ; 

God recall’d the precious loan ; 

God hath taken him away, 

From our bosoms to his own. 

Surely what he wills is best ; 

Happy in his will we rest. 


Sacred to the Memory of her dearly 
lamented husband, 

John Matthias Heritage, Branch Pilot, 
died 28th Oct. 1833, aged 42 years, 

9 months and 20 days. 

►rhis tablet is dedicated by his disconsolate widow, 
to record the virtues of an affectionate and 
loving husband, a fond and tender father, 
and a most generous and warm friend. 


Here lie the tenderest husband, father, friend, 

His life with goodness mark’d with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm, oh may his soul have rest, 
And he who others bless’d, himself be bless’d. 


And also of their youngest son, 
Henry William, 
died 4th June 1833, aged 2 years 
9 months and 22 days. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me 
and forbid them not, for of such 
is the kingdom of Heaven.” 


In Memory of 

Emmeline Felicia Georgiana Heritage, 

died 7tli June 1842, aged 8 years, 

9 months and 4 days. 

Her gentle manners and mild disposition endeared 
her to all who knew her, particularly her 
disconsolate mother, who is left to bewail her loss. 
“ Take the child, no longer mine, 

Thine she is, for ever thine.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Caroline Claudine Heritage, 

the beloved daughter of Mrs. C. Heritage, 
who departed this life on the 7th August 1846, 
aged 14 years, 6 months and 17 days. 
Though oblivious dews settle fast on thee now, 
There’s one heart shall forget thee never ; 

And the stroke that shall end all my sorrow below, 
Shall unite us again for ever. 

“ It is the Lord, let him do what seemeth 
him good.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Ann Catherine Pearson, 

wife of Mr. George Pearson, H. C. Marine, 
who depai’ted this life the 23d December 1826, 
aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eleanor, 
the beloved w r ife of William Graham, 
M. D. H. C. S. Obit. 2d October 1826, 
iEtat 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Frederick Lyons, 
son of Frederick and Eleanor Binns, 
died 19th July 1828, aged 9 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Mellis, 
son of Frederick and Eleanor Binns, 
born October 1st, 1824, died Feb. 11th, 1833, 
aged 8 years, 4 months and 11 days. 

Andrew Young, the son of 
Henry and Frances Faithful, died 3d Sept. 
1824, aged nine months. 

Here are deposited the remains of Anothu Mary, 
daughter of Henry and Janet Burney. 

She was born at Ava, 13th February 1832, 
and died at Calcutta 27th March 1833, 
following her sister to the kingdom of God. 


Mary Maingy, 

daughter of Henry and Janet Burney, born at 
Siam 13th March 1826, died at Calcutta 
22nd Feb. 1827. 

Poor little traveller. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Malachi Lyons, 
who departed this life March 4th, 1827, ’ 

JEt. 55 years. 


s 


130 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Sanford, 
of the Bengal Civil Service, 
who departed this life the ‘23rd February 1827, 
aged 50 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Eastman, 
who departed this life 20th July 1834, 
aged 30 years. 

Let me remember that the parting sigh 
Appoints the just to slumber, not to die ; 

The starting tear, I’d check, I would kiss the rod 
And not to earth resign him but to God. 


Here lieth also 

blaster William Hugh Eastman, 

died 27th Dec. 1830, aged 1 month and 5 days. 
“ I shall go to them, but they shall not return 
to me.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Helen Eastman, 
wife of Mr. Thomas Eastman, who departed 
this life on 14th March 1827, aged 25 years, 

4 months and 13 days. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, 
even so saith the spirit, for they rest from their 
labours.” 


In Memory of Margaret, 
wife of David Thomson, Junr. 

Obit. 15th February 1832, zEtat 26 years. 

When sorrow weeps o’er virtue’s sacred dust, 

Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 

Such were the tears he shed, who grateful pays 
This last sad tribute of his love and praise ; 

Who mourns the best of wives, and friends com- 
bined, 

Where female softness met a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not murmurs, sighs but not despairs, 
Feels as a man, and as a Christian bears. 


To the Memory of David Thomson, Esq. 
born May 23rd 1756, died January 24th 1827, 
aged 70 years, 8 months and 1 day. 

Pause reader ! Here is laid a man of years, 

A long, long traveller thro’ a vale of tears ; 

He ’s gained the point to which the living tend, 
Of rich and poor, behold the journey’s end. 

He was a good and pious Christian, a faithful 
and affectionate husband, a fond and tender father, 
and a sincere friend. 

Long time with sickness he lay sore oppressed 
Kind death has eas’d him ; he lies here at rest. 


Sacred to the Memory of George Ward, 
the infant son of Robert Saunders, Esq. of the 
Civil Service, and of Eliza Wallace, his wife, 
w'ho departed this life on the 17th February 1827, 
aged 8 months and 10 days. 


Eliza Wallace Saunders, 

mother of the infant, whose remains are here 
deposited, departed this life at Singapore on the 
27th of September 1829, in the 28th year of 
her age. 

“ Her ways were ways of pleasantness, and all 
her paths were peace.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Gale, 
wife of T. M. Gale, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 28th April 1831, 
aged 33 years and 5 months. 


Also her son, Master Henry Hamilton Gale, 

died 2 1st March 182 7, aged 9 months and 16 days. 

This Monument an affectionate husband and fa- 
ther rears, 

To prove his love and record his tears ; 

Beneath this tomb, thebeloved wife and infant lies, 
Till the last signal summon them to rise. 

Belov’d they lived, and lamented fell, 

None better than the afflicted sorrowing heart can 
tell. 


In Memory of my dear husband 
John Daniel Bristow, 
late Commander of the Bark “ Will watch.” 
Died November 15th, 1841. 

J. C. B. 


To Gilbert Henry George Elliot, 

the beloved sonof the Honorable J. E. Elliot, C. S. 
and Amelia Elliot his wife, died 8th March 
1827, aged 7 years, 6 months, 10 days. 
u God will redeem my soul from the power of the 
grave, for he shall receive me.” 


In Memory of Anna Maria, wdfe of 
James Black, Branch Pilot, 
who departed this life on the 18th March 1833, 
aged 35 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. M. E. Ross, 
eldest daughter of James and Elizabeth Black, 
who departed this life on the 28th Sept. 1833, 
aged 23 years, 8 months and 15 days. 

She was an affectionate wife and a loving mother ; 
her loss is deeply regretted by all who knew her. 
“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


To the Memory of Mrs. Anna Freed, 
mother of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Black, 
who died 11th December 1830, aged 75 years. 

In Memory of Louisa Matilda, 

wife of James Black, Branch Pilot, 
who departed this life 11th of December 1838, 
aged 21 years, 11 months and 13 days. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth, 
wife of James Black, Branch Pilot, who departed 
this life on the 17 th of February 1827, 
aged 37 years. 

Also, Edwin Joseph Black, 

the infant son of Elizabeth and James Black, 
aged 17 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major General Charles Stuart, 
who departed this life 31st March 1828, 
aged 70 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of "Wm. Dorin, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, a Puisne Judge of the Court 
of Sudder Dewanny and Nizamut Adawlut, 
who departed this life on the 26th Dec. 1827, 
aged 37 years. 


h 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 
daughter of Captain Jas. Bontein, 1st Ben. Lt. Cav , 
who died 20th April 1828, aged 13 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Ranald McDonald, 

of the ship “ Alexander,” who departed this lite 
Gth of January 1828, aged 28 years. 

This Monument is erected by the owners of the 
** Alexander” as a grateful tribute for his 
faithful and valued services. 


In Memory of Mary, 

pious and affectionate wife, the only and much 
loved sister of the above, who died at sea 
5th July 1829, aged 23 years. 

This tablet is inscribed by her husband, 
Lieut. John Bartleman. 


Alexander Murdock, 

died 9th January 1828, aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry Paulin, Esq. 
-solicitor to the Hon. the East India Company, 
Obit. March 7th, 1836, Mt. 43. 

This tablet is erected to the Memory of an affec- 
tionate father, by his son and daughter. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Caroline Mary, 

the affectionate wife of Henry Paulin, Esq. 

■ who departed this life on the 8th of August 1833, 
aged 37 years. 


In Memory of Margaret, 
the beloved wife of Jas. Gregory, died April 
16th, 1836, aged 25 years. 

Also their infant daughter, died June 3d, 1836, 
aged 11 days. 


To the Memory of 
Henry Donnithorne, 

late a Lieut, in H. M. 44 th Regt. who departed 
this life at the Presidency on the 28th day of 
August 1834, in the 35th year of his age. 

Here lies the remains of Elizabeth, 
the wife of John Spence, who departed this life 
on the 15th Sept. 1833, aged 33 years. 

This frail memorial is placed here by her hus- 
band, whom she sincerely loved. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
M iss M aria Hewetson, 
born on the 2d April 1821, died on the 
21st September 1833. 

This sincere tribute of affection is inscribed by 
William Inglis. 


Phillip George Frushard, , 

Obit. 15th Sept. 1833. yEtat 26. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Ambrose, 

wife of Mr. James Ambrose, ship builder, 
who departed this life on the 18th Sept. 1833, 
aged 28 years. 

She is gone where the wicked cease from trou- 
bling, and the weary find eternal rest. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
George Chester, Jn. Esq. 
who departed this life on the 31st of Aug. 1833, 
deeply lamented, aged 20 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Edward Cripps, 
of the H. C. Marine, who departed this life August 
24th, 1833, aged 30 years, 5 months and 1 day. 

s 2 


And Ann, his beloved wife, who departed this life 
19th September 1833, aged 22 years, 

4 months and 12 days. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


To the Memory of 

William Plumer W’ilson, 

who died 1st August 1833, aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. T. Gibson, 
who died 21st June 1833, aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Mary McArthur, 

who departed this life on the 14th of 
July 1833, aged 22 years. Erected by 
her affectionate brothers. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Hannah Maria Braddon, 
the beloved wife of W. Braddon, Esq. 

B. C. S. who died on the 8th August 
1833, in the 43d year of her age. 

She lived in the habitual and cheerful exercise 
of those Christian graces and good works which, 
while they rendered her life an inestimable 
blessing to her family and friends, forbid them 
now to sorrow for her death, as though 
there was no hope in it. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, 
yea, saith the spirit, for they rest from their 
labours and their works do follow them.” 

So she died, and thereby are those who 
loved her comforted. 


Sacred to the Memory of Anne Frances Breen, 
the beloved wife of William Chisholm Breen, 
who departed this life on the 28th July 1833, 
aged 25 years, 3 months and 4 days. 


Anne Lindsay, the infant daughter of 
The Hon’ble C. R. Lindsay, born 10th August 
1833, and died on the same day. 


Sacred to the Memory of Louisa Scott, 
the beloved wife of William Seton Charters, M. D. 
Surgeon H. C. Service, who departed this life 
23rd August 1833, aged 39 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of a beloved sister, 
Matilda Cox, 

Obit 10th June 1833, /Etat 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sophia Allcock, 
died 30th May 1833, aged 28 years, 
2 months and 1 day. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James Rd. Harwell, Esq. 

H. C. Civil Service, and sub-Treasurer of this 
Presidency for 16 years. 

Died April 16th, 1833, aged 49. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Cook, 
who died on the 3rd June 1833, aged 38 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of George Chester, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 16th November 
1833, deeply lamented, Aged 52 years. 



132 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURI AL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Slayer, 
the beloved wife of Mr. F. Hayer, who departed 
this life on the 13th February 1833, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr, Fidel Hayer, 
died 7th November 1836, aged 45 years. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Ann Manly. 
Wife of L. Manly, Esq. Merchant, died 2d 
March 1833, aged 59 years. 

This stone is laid by her affectionate daughter, 
Fanny Ewin. 


Also Charles "Wellington Ewin, 

Born 3d of November 1832, died 25th 
September 1833, much lamented by his 
affectionate mother, F. Ewin. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Hichard Mabert, 
died 21st May 1S45, aged 42 years and 
11 months. 

Oye, whose cheek the tear of pity stains, 

Draw near with pious reverence and attend, 
Here lie the loving husband’s dear remains, 
The tender father and the generous friend. 

This tribute of affection is raised by his 
wife and children. 

To the Memory of Mr. W. F. Mabert, 
who departed this life on the 3rd May 1833, 
aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Moore Gale, Esq. 
who died on the 6th November 1833, 
aged 40 years, sincerely regretted. 


Jacob Louis Qtho Eilthey, 

born at Breslau 10th November 1804, died at 
Calcutta 26th April 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas "White, 
Branch Pilot, Pensioner in the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 2d May 1833, 
aged 69 years. 

The sea of life I have weathered, 

My destined port I have found, 

Receive my soul, O Gracious Lord, 

Within thy celestial bound. • 

This tablet is erected by his affectionate 
wife, E. D. White. 


Sacred to the Memory of Falls Harfct, Esq. 
Assistant Surgeon, 41st Regiment N. I. died 
11th May 1836, aged 37 years. 

Also Master G. T. Trafford, 
died 24th November 1836, aged 1 year 
and 9 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major "William Mitchell, 
of the Bengal Artillery, who departed this life 
on the 6th October 1817. 


Erected in Memory of Harriette, 
the wife of George Richardson, Esq. of the Civil 
Service, and daughter of the late Roger 
Swetenham, Esq. of Somerford, in the county 
of Chester who departed this life the 18th July 
1817, aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Anna Maria, 
wife of Ebenezer Thompson, who departed this 
transitory life almost without a warning, on 
the 4th November 1817, at the early 
age of 20 years, 

leaving 4 helpless children, a disconsolate father 
and a truly affectionate husband, to mourn her 
irreparable loss in the several relations of 
daughter, wife, mother and friend. Long will she 
remain remembered with fond affection. 

O best of wives, O dearer far to me than when 
thy virgin charms were yielded to my arms ; 

(But for your lovely pledges) 

How can my soul endure the loss of thee. 
Yes, my Anna, thy breast was the mansion of 
goodness and you suspected no evil in others : 
your prudence of management was an honor 
to me, and I heard your praise with secret 
delight. Happy thy Eby who made thee his wife, 
Happy our dear babes who called thee Mamma. 

Oh may each passer bye, the lesson learn, 

Which can alone the bleeding heart sustain ; 
(Where friendship weeps at virtue’s funeral urn,) 
That to the pure in heart to die is gain. 

To commemorate her virtues this monument is 
erected by her severely afflicted husband, who 
alone is best able to judge of their influence 
and effects, and who is anxious to record this 
lasting testimony of the felicity of their conjugal 
union during a period of six years and eight 
days, being married 27th October 1811. Of the 
affection, love, gratitude, and reverence which 
he feels for her dear memory, and of the deep 
and indelible anguish which the premature 
loss of her has impressed upon his perturbed 
mind. Also to the memory of her infant 
son, who died October 28th, 1816. 

Farewell ! yet broken pillars of my fate, 

My life’s companion and my infant son, 

Let, while this silent stone I consecrate, 

To conjugal paternal love forlorn. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” — Job, i. 21. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. Hyde, 
wife of Lieut. J. F. Hyde, assistant to the 
Surveyor General. The premature death of this 
most amiable, accomplished and virtuous lady, 
holds out an awful example, how uncertain 
our tenure in this vale of tears. 

Died 17th November 1817, aged 23 years. 


Here lies the remains of Mr. Angus Morrison, 
who departed this life on the 16th day of March 
1818, aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Anne, 
the wife of Alexander Ross, of the East India 
Company’s Civil Service. She died on the 5th 
January 1818, aged 26 years and 9 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant "William Crawford, 

of the 1st Battn. 16th Regt. N. I. who departed 
this life on the 16th of April 1818, in the 25th 
year of his age. 

This monument is erected by the officers of the 
corps, as a lasting testimony of their sincere 
esteem and regard for his genuine worth. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Captain John 'Wales, 
ot' the H. C. Bombay Marine, and Marine 
Surveyor General ot" India, who died January 
15th, 1810, aged 41 years. 


Sacred to the Memory and virtues of 

Fricilla Forbes, 

the wife of James Forbes, of Calcutta, Gentleman, 
one of the Attornies of the Supreme Court of 
Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, who 
departed this life in the town of Calcutta March 
21st, 180S, in the 49th year of her age. 


In Memory of a beloved child, Frances Sophia, 
daughter of Lane and Margaret Magniac. She 
died on the 4th June 1820, aged 7 months 
22 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Fraser, 
late pensioner in the Hon’ble Company’s Marine, 
i who died the 14th February 1816, aged 70 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Peter Galbrith, alias Patrick Galbrith, 

a native of Greenock in Scotland, pensioner on 
the H. C. Marine Establishment, who departed 
this life on the 9th May 1815, aged 70 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of "W. C. Jones, 
Bengal Engineers, Obit 18th December 1818, 
yEt. 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. "William Edwin Davies, 
who died on the 1st of March 1819, in the 23d 
year of his age. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


Sacred to the fond Memory of a beloved child, 

Anna Paris Dick, 

daughter of George Stuart and Mary Dick, who 
died 18th May 1820, aged 1 year, 9 months 
and 28 days. 

“ Even so Father for so it seemed good in 
thy sight.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
an affectionate and dutiful daughter, 
Frances Ann Dick, 
who died on the 7th July 1819, 
aged 26 years, 9 months and 4 days. 


Lieut. Frederick Anstice, 17th Regt. B. N. I. 
Obit. 29th August 1819, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Street, 
who departed this life Sept. 27th, 1819, 
aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Frederick Thomas Barfoot, 

son of Thomas Barfoot, who departed this life 
October 9th, 1822, aged 11 years. 

“ I love them that love me and those that seek 
me early shall find me.” 


Also of Elizabeth Barfoot, 

wife of Thomas Barfoot, who departed this life 
Jan. 24th, 1823, aged 50 years. 

“ God is a spirit and they that worship him must 
worship him in spirit and in truth.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Augusta Jones, 
who departed this life on the 31st of August 
1819, aged 31 years. 


To the Memory of G. Williams, Esq. 
late chief officer of the II. C. Ship 
“ Thomas Grenville,” 
who died 10th Oct. 1819, aged 26 years. 


Mr. Andrew Bowie 

Was a well known shipwright, and proprietor 
of Morton’s patent slip at Gussery. He was an 
enterprizing and scientific individual, and believed 
to be the first who introduced Morton’s useful in- 
vention. He was mild and amiable in his man- 
ners, died after a residence of seventeen years in 
this country, esteemed and lamented by all who 
knew him. 

The following is the epitaph over him ; — 
Andrew Bowie, Esq. 
died 17th Sept. 1835, aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Jennings, 
who departed this life May the 3d, 1824, 
aged 38 years. 

‘ ‘ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 

“ Px-epare to follow me.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs Anne Bowie, 
wife of Mr. Andrew Bowie, head assistant to 
Messrs. Kyd and Co. Kidderpore, 
who departed this life on the 5th Sept. 1826, 
aged 28 years. 

Eleven days after giving birth to a male child, 
who died 8 hours after his birth. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Caroline BSaria Low, 

wife of Captain Robert Low r , of the ship “ Com- 
petitor,” who departed this life on the 6th July 
1821, aged 24 yeai’s, 

After a few days illness which she bore 
with Christian patience and fortitude. Her amiable 
and virtuous disposition and good temper 
rendei’ed her dear to her relatives and friends, 
and an irreparable loss to her affectionate 
and disconsolate husband. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Elijah Impey, 
Obit. June 10th, 1821. 

He was a pious Christian, zealous and skilful 
in his profession and excellent in every 
relation of private life. In the same grave lies his 
beloved child Elvira Eliza Harriet, 
aged 3 years, Obit. August 14th, 1821. 


Sacred to the Alemory of Mrs. Janet Bryce, 
widow of the late D. Bryce, Esq. of Jamaica, 
who departed this life May 30th, 1821, 
aged 62 yeai's. 


Sacred to the Alemory of 
Francis Dickson, Esq. 
a Captain in the 26th Bengal Infantry 
and Aide-de-Camp to the Alarquis of Hastings, 
died on the 11th of May 1821, iEtat 38. 
Deeply regretted by his numerous friends. 


134 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Duncan Forbes Robertson, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 27th June 1821, 
aged 21 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain George Liindesay, 

of the Engineers on the Bengal Establishment, 
eldest son of George Lindesay, Esq. of 
Wormiston in Fifeshire, who after 12 years 
service, in which he acquired not only the appro 
bation of his superiors, but the warm regard 
and esteem of many private friends, 
prematurely perished on the 10th of Oct. 1821, 
in the 31st year of his age. 

(In company with John Morrison, Esq, 
an Assistant Surgeon on this establishment,) 
by the upsetting of a Pinnace near Kedgeree. 
This memorial is erected by a few of those who 
most highly valued their departed friend as a 
slight tribute to his worth. 


Jonathan Beanland, 

died 25th Dec. 1821, aged 11 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Eliza D. Mathew, 

who departed this life on the 21st May 1823, 
aged 10 years. 


Elizabeth, 

wife of Henry Thomas Celebroke, Esq. 
Pious, benign and exemplary. Died 31st 
Oct. 1814, aged 29. 

Mrs. Eliza Megee, 

died 8th July 1817, aged 19 years, 10 months 
and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Ann Russ, 
who departed this life on the 18th of June 1817, 
aged 28 years. 


Sacre to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Russ, 
who departed this life on the 22d of Sept. 1820, 
aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Air. Thomas Russ, 
late a Master in the H. C. Pilot service, Obit. 15th 
March 1823, aged 39 years. 

Erected by his afflicted widow. 


In Memory of Mary Ann Russ, 

died 6th December 1841, aged 28 years, 
7 months 14 days. 

Happy soul ! thy days are ended, 

All thy mourning days below ; 

Go, by angel guards attended, 

To the throne of Jesus, go ! 

Waiting to receive thy spirit 
Lo ! the Saviour stands above, 

Claims the purchase of His merit, 
Reaches forth the crown of love. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Bennett, 

died 25th November 1834, aged 38 years 
and 16 days. 

This tablet of Memory is given by her son, 
G, W. Keymer. 


'Co the Memory of Mr. George Keymer, 
late Master in the H. C. Marine, who departed 
this life on the 4th of May 1817, 
aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Keymer, 
wife of Mr. G. W. Keymer, died 6th April 1836, 
aged 20 years. 

Weep not for me, lament no more, 

I am not dead, but gone before. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Stewart, 
who departed this life the 4th July 1831, 
aged 48 years, 7 months and 2 days. 

Forgive blest shade the tributary tear, 

That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; 
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here, 
And stay’d thy progress to seat of bliss. 

No more confin’d to grov’ling scenes of night, 
No more a tenant pent on mortal clay 
How should I rather hail thy glorious flight, 

And trace thy progress to the realms of day. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
the late Mr. Francis Stewart, 

Branch Pilot in the H. C.’s Marine, 
who departed this life 29th October A. D. 1816, 
aged 43 years, 2 months and 25 days. 

O take these tears — mortality’s relief, 

And till we share your joys forgive our grief ; 
These little rites, a stone, a verse receive, 

’Tis all a consort, all a friend can give. 

Mrs. Mary Stewart, 

died 21st October 1812, aged 70 years. 


In Memory of Mrs. Mary Brown, 
relict of Air. Jolm Brown, died 24th April 1842, 
aged 76 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Jobn Brown, 
who died the 4th Alarch 1817, aged 49 years. 


Sacred to the Alemory of 
Lieutenant-General Hugh Stafford, 
who departed this life 13th January 1819, 
aged 67 years. 


Matilda Maria McAVhirter Hunter, 

died 11th June 1822, aged 8 months and 19 days. 


Sacred to the Alemory of 
Lieut.-Colonel Arch. Campbell, 
of the Bengal Army, who died on the 19th 
Alarch 1821, aged 57. 

To the active duties of a soldier in India, thirty- 
seven years of his life was devoted ; during this 
period various offices of responsibility were en- 
trusted to him. In the discharge of which, 
the warmth of his heart, his mild and equal man- 
ners ; his disposition uniformly humane, 
considerate and kind, his sound judgment, and 
spotless integrity secured the affection of his 
associates, the good will of the community, and 
commanded the esteem and confidence of the 
state. It may with truth be said of this worthy 
man, that he never made a man his foe 
nor ever lost a friend. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Colonel Colin Mackenzie, 
of Engineers on the Madras Establishment, and 
Surveyor General of India, who departed this 
life on the 8th May MDCCCXXI. 

Mt. S. LXVIII. 


Sacred to the Memory of two brothers, 

Thomas Boileau, 

born 29th Feb. and died 15tli May 1820. 
And Solomon, born 14tb March and died 
30th June 1824. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 
Death came with friendly care, 

The op’ning buds to heaven convey’d, 
And bade them blossom there. 


Sacred to the Memory of Alicia, 
the daughter S. H. Boileau and Harriet, his wife, 
born 8th February and died 17th March 1839. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Martindell, 

who departed this life on the 19th February 
1835, aged 31 years. 

This stone is erected to his Memory by his 
affectionate wife. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Gabriel Martindell, 

a most lovely and beloved child, born 21st of 
July 1824, died 2d of September 1825. 

“ But Jesus called them unto him, and said, 
suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 
them not, for of such is the kingdom of God.” 
This stone is put up by his poor afflicted parents, 
Robert and Maria Martindell. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Ellinor Mary Martindell, 

a lovely and affectionate child, born 9th 
November 1813, died 18th February 1820. 
Sleep soft in dust, await the Almighty’s will, 
Then rise unchang’d and be an angel still. 


Sacred to the Memory of Anna Grace, 
the beloved daughter of Henry and Eliza 
Martindell, born 9tli March 1817, and died 
12th April 1828. 

Her father’s and mother’s pride, beloved she 
lived and lamented died, in the full assurance of 
everlasting bliss through the merits of Jesus 
Christ, having in the agonies of death called out 
“ she was happy.” 

11 Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Xiouisa Richards Martindell, 

the beloved wife of H. Martindell, Esq. Attorney 
at Law, who departed this life on the 24th 
November 1840, aged 20 years, 
deeply and sincerely regretted. This Tablet is 
erected by her disconsolate husband. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Gabriel Martindell, Esq. 
Attorney at Law, wiio departed this life on the 
3rd October 1844, aged 33 years. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 
This tablet is erected by his brothers to his 
much respected Memory. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Frances Ann Bedell, 

the lovely and very beloved infant of uham 
and Frances E. A. Bedell, born 24th March 
1829, died 28th December 1830. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of William, 
the lovely infant son of William and Frances 
E. A. Bedell, born 26th October 1832, died 
28th May 1833. 

“ It is the Lord, let him do what seemeth 
him good.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Frances Bedell, 
the very beloved and third daughter of William 
and Frances E. A. Bedell, born 29th August 
1834, died 30th September 1842. She was a 
most affectionate and dutiful child. 

“ To him that loved us and washed us from our 
sins in His own blood to him be the glory.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Thomas George Street, 
of the ship “ Triumph,” who departed this life 
on the 2nd December 1820, in the 41st year 
of his age, leaving an afflicted wife and children 
and many friends to regret his loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Ann Jones, 
the wife of Arthur Jones, Esq. who departed this 
life 3rd October 1820, aged 20 years 
and 10 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Dormer, Esq. 
Commander of the H. C. C. S. Coldstream, 
who departed this life the 10th of October 
1820, aged 50 years. 

In Memory of Patrick Lindesay, 

2nd officer of the II. C. S. “ Sir David Scott,” 
who died at Saugor on the 4th June 1822, 
aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Mary Dick, 
who died 8th April 1820, aged 56 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Henry Chalcroft, Junr. 
who died 23rd December 1830, aged 21 years, 
11 months and 24 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Mabert, 
who died 14th of October 1826, leaving a 
husband and 2 infants to lament her loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Morton Paye, Esq. 
died 13th February 1827, aged 38 years. 


To the Memory of 
Edward Cornwallis 'Wilmot, 

of the Bengal Civil Service, who died at Calcutta 
23rd December 1826, aged 19 years and 
3 months. 

This monument is erected by his fellow-students 
and friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Webster, 
wife of Mr. John Webster, who departed this life 
on the 9th April 1827, aged 18 years. 


I. 


136 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Harrie Nichelson, 

of the 15 th Regiment N. I. late Paymaster 
to the Bengal Division of Troops serving under 
Major General Sir A. Campbell, K. C. B. in Ava, 
who departed this life on the 20th of Dec. 1826, 
aged 40 years, 9 months and 13 days. 

By the death of Major Nichelson, 
the Army has lost a brave and zealous officer, 
and many of its members, a generous- 
hearted friend ; whilst among his own immediate 
relatives his loss is most sincerely 
and deeply felt. 


To the Memory of F. J. Miller, 
son of Lieut. G. Miller, 25th Regt. N. I. 
Obit. 10th February 1832, 

2£t. 1 year, 11 months, 26 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Jane Harriet Rice, 

daughter of the late Richard Blechynden, Esq. 
of Calcutta. She departed this life on the 4tli of 
Jany. 1827, at the early age of 20years & 12 days. 

Her career on earth was finished ; as a wife, 
sister and friend, she was most exemplary and has 
left the memorial of her virtues deeply engraven 
in the hearts of those who have known and 
loved her from her infancy, who must ever mourn 
her early and sudden removal. 

Her infant daughter lies beside her. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Charlotte Welchman, 
relict of C. W. Welchman, Esq. of the Bengal 
Medical Service, died 18th August 1832, 
aged 39 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander War dr op, Esq. 
Surgeon PL C. Service, died 6th July 1832, 
aged 37 years. 


In Memory of Charles Cashmore, 

late of Birmingham, Assistant New Mint, 
died 25th June 1832, aged 32 years. 


Robert Henry Stuart, Esq. 
Honorable C. C. Service, eldest son of 
Major General the Honorable Patrick Stuart, 
departed this life 22d August 1832, aged 21 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Emily Georgiana Wetcnhall, 

wife of Wm. Marsden Wetenhall, Esq. 

Captain of H. M. 10th Regt. 
who died at Calcutta 2nd October 1842, 
aged 33 years. 


To the Memory of 
Miss Emily Elizabeth Dickie, 

aged 19 years, 8 months 22 days, 
died 16th June 1832. 

Also to the Memory of Thomas Harton, Esq. 
who died 23d October 1833, aged 56 years. 


Thomas Doug-al, 

born at Montrose, N. B. 23d August 1807, 
died 11th April 1832, in his 25th year. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Harriet Dugat, 
who died 1 9th October 1832, 
aged 27 years, 9 months, 10 days. 

Also in Memory of Pierre Louis Dugat, 
who died 25th Sept. 1837, aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Fraser, Esq. 
born at Kelso, in the county of Roxburgh, N. B. 

for many years Indigo Planter and Superin- 
tendent of embankments in the district of Jessore, 
residing at Damoodiah. Obit, at Calcutta 
16th April 1832, JEt. 83 years. 

This Monument is erected by his children as a 
token of their affection. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret Hoggan, 
who after a life of unpretending piety and virtue 
calmly fell asleep, relying securely on the 
merits of her Redeemer, 13th August 1832, 
aged 41 years. 

“ Blessed are the pure in heart for they 
shall see God.” 


Lieut. Robert Me Far lane Campbell, 23d X. I. 

born 23d May 1805, died 8th April 1832, aged 27. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Augusta Jones, 
who departed this life on the 31st of Aug. 1819, 
aged 31 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Streynsham Legh Master, Esq. 
who departed this life July 17th, 1832, 
aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Robertson, 
relict of the late Mr. R. Robertson, who departed 
this life 10th Nov. 1830, aged 57 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza, 
the wife of John Henry Barlow, Esq. Bengal 
Civil Service, Obit. 4th September 
1830, aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Rruce, 
the good, the affectionate and charitable wife of 
R. W. Bruce, Esq. eldest daughter of the 
late Major Adam Brown of the Madras Army, I 
by his second marriage, died 27th October 
1830, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Templeton, 

eldest daughter of Colonel William Hopper, 
of the Bengal Artillery, and wife of Mr. John I, 
Templeton, who departed this life on the B 

14th August 1830, aged 28 years, 
and 10 months. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away r 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 

This Monument is erected by her afflicted bus- ; 
band, who is left with a young family to 
deplore her irreparable loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major-General William Hopper, 
of the Bengal Artillery, who after having served . 

the Honorable Company for a period of sixty 
years, departed this life on the 6th of July 1843, 
aged 77 years, 11 months, 
lie was respected through life by all who knew I 
him, and died sincerely lamented. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


137 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Andrew Anderson, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, who died the 1st of 
Sept. 1818, aged 20 years. 

Forgive blest shade the tributary tear 
That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; 
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here 
And stay’d thy progress to the seat of bliss. 

No more confin’d to grov’ling scenes of night ; 
No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, 

Now should I rather hail thy glorious flight, 
And trace thy progress to the realms of day. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 
iwife of Major J. L. Stuart, Aid-de-Camp to the 
Governor General, and daughter of the late 
'R. Morris, M. P. for Gloster, who departed this 
life 16th September 1818, aged 24. 

To record the lamented loss of her whose 
domestic virtues and affectionate heart 
endeared her to her family 
and friends, 

This stone is inscribed by her disconsolate 
husband. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. -Colonel J. L. Stuart, 
rwho departed this life 3d Sept. 1827, aged 44. 
[Inscribed by an affectionate and grateful friend. 


Here lies the body of my friend 
Colonel George Fleming, J. A. S. 

He died on the 3d July 1818, at the age of 57. 


To the Memory of 
Ensign Win. Hewett, 
died 21st Oct. 1818, aged 17 years. 


Here lyeth the body of Ann Harington, 
wife of Wm. Harington, Esq. of the H. C. 
Civil Service, Madras. Obit. 4th January 1819, 
JEt. 52. 

“ I have fought a good fight, I have finished 
any course. I have kept the faith, heneforth is 
laid up for me a crown of righteousness.” 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord 
ithat they may rest from their labours, and their 
> works do follow them.” 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
Iblessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of James Irwin, Esq. 
of the H. C. Civil Service, who died 5th 
Dec. 1818, aged 40 years. 
tHe was in life distinguished for the benevolent 
warmth of his disposition ; as a public servant 
his career was strongly marked by unabating zeal 
and the firmest integrity. In his domestic 
relations as a son, a husband and a 
I father, he was truly exemplary, and as a friend 
ardent and sincere. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Fendall, 

•the wife of John Fendall, Esq. who departed this 
life on the 8th September 1818. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Harriet Augusta Trotter, 

the beloved wife of T. C. Trotter, B. C. S. 

■ who died at Calcutta on the 30th of July 1838, 
aged 21 years, 1 month and 24 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Laura Maria Trotter, 

wife of Archibald Trotter, B. C. S. who died at 
Calcutta on the 21st Nov. 1818, aged 26 years 
and 6 months. 

This Monument is erected by her husband, as a 
record of his devoted attachment, and a token 
of affectionate remembrance of that exemplary 
worth which endeared her to her friends and 
acquired her the esteem and regard of the society 
in which she lived. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Lieut. James Barnett, 

of the 16th Regt. B. N. I. who departed this life 
the 11th day of April, A. D. 1819, 
aged 26 years. 

“ Into thine hand I commit my spirit ; Thou 
hast redeemed me, O Lord God of truth.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliza Bathgate, 

who departed this life on the 12th of March 1819, 
aged 19 years and 3 days. 


Here lyeth the Mortal remains of 

Chas. Hicolson, Esq. 

Merchant and Indigo Planter, wlxo departed this 
life in a sure and certain hope of a joyful 
resurrection, on the 9th May, A. D. 1819, aged 
75 years, who feared God but not death, and 
maintained independence, but sought not riches ; 

who thought none below him but the base and 
unjust ; none above him but the wise and virtuous 
who loved his family, friends and kindred, the 
poor and needy, with an ardour which was the 
chief source of all his pleasures and his pains. 

The righteous souls that take their flight, 

Far from this world of pain, 

In God’s paternal bosom blest, 

For ever shall remain. 


This tomb covers the remains of 

Alexander Colvin, 

whose life was passed in the exercise of all the 
charities which flow from Christian principle 
and from the purest benevolence of heart. 

His affectionate and amiable temper gained him 
the love of society, and rendered him inexpressi- 
bly dear to his wife, his children, and his family. 

As an eminent merchant of this city during a 
period of forty years his candour, integrity and 
conciliatory disposition secured to him the 
respect and attachment of the Mercantile 
community, who erect this monument in 
Memory of his virtues and in testimony of their 
affectionate esteem. Born A. D. 1756. 

Died A. D. 1818. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas Montgomerie, 

of the Bengal Artillery, Aid-de-camp to the 
Governor General, who died the 18th day of 
April A. D. 1819, aged 22 years. 

He was highly respected in his professional, 
and much loved in his private character. 


To the Memory of SI. Blackburn, Esq. 

Obit 24th May 1819, aged 59. 

In life he hoped for salvation in Jesus Christ • in 
death he rests in peace until the fulness of time. 


x 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


1 ?,t 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Ensign R. E. Blackburn, 

died 11th June 1825, aged 19 years. 
Blessed Lord receive his soul. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Blackburn, 

Relict of the late Samuel Blackburn, 
aged 62 years, 10 months 23 days. 

Obit 17th May 1840. 

“ I am become like a broken vessel, take me, 
for whom have I in heaven but thee ; my hope hath 
been in thee ; thou art my God.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Captain James Randle, 
of the country service, who departed this life 
on the 10th February 1841, aged 42 
years, 1 1 months and 4 days. 


Also his infant daughter, 

Emily Jane Dunlop Randle, 

who died 17th January 1842, aged 2 years, 
4 months and 7 days. 

Rest be unto their souls. 


Affection’s tribute by four young Orphans to 
the memory of a dear departed mother. 

And is Sacred to 
Mrs. Isabella Maria Randle, 

Relict of the late Captain James Randle, died 
30th November 1846, aged 37 years 11 months. 
* 1 The Lord in mercy tempereth the wind 
to the shorn lamb.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Master Wm. P. Taylor, 
who departed this life on the 8th of August 
1821, aged 1 year, 5 months and 27 days. 


Catherine Herbert. 


To the Memory of Edward Pond, 
of the H. C. Civil Service, died on the 12th 
December 1819, aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Forsyth, 
daughter of Isaac Forsyth of Elgin, Scotland, 
who died at Calcutta 30th June 1821, aged 19. 

On distant shores from kindred dust remov’d, 
Here rest the relics of a maid belov’d, 

Who grace to virtue, taste to knowledge join’d, 
And sense and temper happily combin’d. 

With warm affections and devoutly pure, 

Her faith was steadfast and her hope secure, 
Secure her bliss, where her best thoughts were 
given, 

She fled from earth and gained her Saviour’s 
heaven. 


Sacred to the Memory of William Ritchie, Esq. 
Merchant, who died at Calcutta, 5th June 1819, 
aged 23 years. 

This Monument is erected by his attached friends 
and partners Donald Macintyre and John 
Anderson. 


Miss Mary Hewett, 

who departed this life 7th July 1821, aged 7 dys. 


To the Memory of Charlotte Whittle, 

and her infant daughter, wife of Lieut. H. Whittle, 
R. N. who deported this life August 1st, 1820. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Peter Lewis Grant, 

12th Regiment Bengal N. Infantry, acting Town 
Major of Fort William, who died 12th of 
June 1819, in the 39th year of his age. 

The merits of Major Grant as an officer, are 
inscribed in the records of the state, and 
his gallant conduct during the memorable siege of 
Bhurtpore obtained for him the warmest 
approbation of Lord Lake, Commander-in-chief 
of the army in India $ by his brother officers, 
he was esteemed, by the soldiers, respected and 
beloved ; in private life, his cheerful temper 
and amiable qualities gained him many friends 
who sincerely deplored his loss. And to the 
memory of Anne his wife, daughter of George 
Powney, Esq. of Grosvenor Square, who departed 
this life the 2nd of Sept. 1819, aged 26 years, 
deeplyregretted by her family and numerous 
friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Knud Nielsen Wolff, 

who departed this life the 18th August 1819, 
aged 33 years, and much regretted. 

“ It is appointed unto all men once to die.” 


Underneath are deposited the remains of 
Samuel Munckley Duntze, Esq. 
late assistant superintendent of Police 
in the Lower Provinces, who departed this life 
19th August 1819, aged 25 years. 

Deeply and generally regretted ; his urbanity of 
manners, and benevolence of heart made him 
admired and beloved by all classes, and the 
pride of every circle. This humble inscription to 
the memory of departed worth and excellence is 
offered by an old friend and school-fellow 
who had intimately known him upwards 
of seventeen years, and owed him 
many, very many obligations. 

Mr. 'William Graham, 

born Feb. 1775, died Dec. 1819. 


Sacred to the Memory of Andrew Allan, 
a Lieut, in the H. C. 2d Bat. 25th Regt. B. N. I. 
and a Sub-Assistant Commissary General, 
who departed this life 23d of August 
1819, aged 34 years. 

To mark their respect for his principles and 
intelligent zeal in the public service, and their 
esteem for his virtues which endeared him to a 
large circle of friends, the officers of his 
corps have caused this Monument 
to be erected over his remains. 


Here lieth the remains of 
Lieut. Thomas Dingwall Fordyce, 

of the Bengal Artillery, 
who departed this life 7th of January 1820, 
aged 28 years and 9 months. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that h 
shall stand at the last day upon the earth, am 
though after my skin, worms destroy this body 
yet in my flesh shall I see God.” 

This Memorial is erected by a disconsolate 
widow, who laments the early death of an 
affectionate husband and a faithful friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Alsager, F.sq. 
who departed this life on the 
5th of September 1819, aged 27 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


139 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Matilda Adolphus Liddington, 

an amiable and highly accomplished young lady, 
who departed this life 10th of Jan. 1820, 
aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Ensign James Donnithorne 

who departed this life on the 17 th day of 
September 1819, aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain William Peacock Fulcher, 
Obit. 22d day of July 1820, iEt. 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Christiana Anne, 
wife of John Alexander Pringle, 
who departed this life on the 12th day of Nov. 
1830, aged 26 years. 

1 He said, weep not, she is not dead but sleepeth.” 


Uharlotte Christina Helen, the daughter of 
t*avid and Frances Pringle, died 20th April 1834, 
aged 2 years and 6 months. 

M Jesus called them unto him and said, suffer 
ttle children to come unto me and forbid them 
lot, for of such is the kingdom of God.” 


Soli Deo Honor sit et gloria in secula 
seculorum. Amen. 

Beneath this tablet lie entombed the venerable 
remains of 

Mrs. Eliza Margt. Harding-, 

who departed this life on the 9th Oct. 1832, 
in the 78th year of her age. 

As those we love decay, we die in part, 

String after string is sever’d from the heart, 
Till loosen’d life at last but breathing clay 
Without one pang is glad to fall away. 

Yet friends when dead, are but removed from 
sight, 

Sunk in the lustre of eternal light. 

And when the parting storms of life are o’er 
May still rejoin us on a happier shore. 


In Memory of 

Charles Fleming Hunter, Esq. 
Member of the Mercantile Firm of Gilmore & Co. 
of this city, who died at Calcutta 5 th 
Oct. 1832, aged 47 years. 


To the Memory of 
Edward Marjoribanks, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, eldest son of Sir John 
Marjoribanks, Bart, of Lees, born 14th 
Jan. 1792, died 1st Jan. 1833. 


To the Memory of Major E. Lawrence, 
Assistant Secretary to Government, Military 
epartment, Obit. 12th November 1830, JEt. 44. 


To the Memory of Miss Margaret Brae, 
born 10th August 1788, died 23d Nov. 1830. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William White, Esq. 
eldest son of the late James White, Esq. 
Merchant in Glasgow, who departed 
this life 21st Oct. 1831, aged 36. 

Also to the Memory of Lieut. James White, 
49th Regt. Bengal Native Infantry, 
second son of the late James White, Esq. 
ho died at Arracan 24th August 1825, aged 25. 


“ The righteous die under God’s covenant of 
everlasting life.” 

Sacred to the Memory of Sophia Amelia, 
the beloved wife of J. H. Patton, C. S. who de- 
parted this life on the 26th November 1832. 
Aged 29 years. 

Sainted spirit Heaven-ward rise, 

Soar the native of the skies, 

Pearl of price, by Jesus bought, 

To his glorious likeness wrought ; 

Go to shine before his throne, 

Deck his mediatorial crown, 

Go His triumphs to adorn, 

Born of God, to God return. 

Lo he beckons from on high, 

Fearless to his presence fly, 

Thine the merit of his blood, 

Thine the righteousness of God. 


acred to the Memory of Mr. Henry Chalcraft, 
who died 2 2d October 1831, aged 43 years. 


To the Memory of Donald Macleod, Esq. 
died 6th Nov. 1831, aged 32 years. 

Also of his sou Alexander, 
died 20th Nov. 1831, aged 1 year 2 months. 


Frances Mary, daughter of 
H. II, and Frances Wilson, born 20th October 
1830, died 25th November 1831. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Adam Nicholson, Esq. 
late Branch Pilot H. C. Marine, 
died 18th August 1832, aged 58 years. 


To the Memory of Charles Clark Roberts, 
born 20th Dec. 1825, died 31st Jan. 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Jacob Frederick Plusker, Esq. 
of Chinsurah, born 11th Nov. 1796, died 22d 
Oct. 1832, JEt. 45 years, 1 1 months, 11 days, 
x 2 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major Irving Maling, 

Presidency Paymaster, Fort William. Obit. 17th 
November 1831, JEtat 50 years. 


Here lie the remains of 

Charles Hunter, Esq. 

Member of the Medical Board, who departed this 
life the 7th May 1831, aged 58 years. 

The most kind and affectionate brother, the sin- 
cere friend and the truly worthy man. 

Sacred to the Memory of Jane, 
eldest daughter of Peter Andrew, Esq. 
who departed this life January 18th 1838, 
aged 42 years, 6 months 29 days. 

This Monument is raised in grateful remembrance 
by an affectionate brother, who long will lament 
the vanished ray that scattered gladness 
over his path. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

David Andrew, Esq. 

who departed this life 25th November 1837, 
aged 69 years, 2 months and 20 days. 


140 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of William, 

3rd son of David Andrew, Esq. born 1st August 
1840, died 1st August 1841. 


Sacred to the Memory of Francis Harris, 

4th son of David Andrew, Esq. who departed this 
life on the 22d Nov. 1844, aged 2 years, 

4 months and 22 days. 


This tablet is raised by Helen Harris, to the 
Sacred Memory of her husband, 

Francis Harris, Esq. 

of Khal Boalya, Kishenaghur, who departed this 
life at Bombay, to which place he went for 
the benefit of his health, on the 6th day 
of September 1843, aged 42 years, 5 months 
and 18 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Peter Andrew, Esq. 
who departed this life 27th August 1839, 
aged 68 years, 11 months and 15 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of David, 
eldest son of David Andrew, Esq. who departed 
this life on the 26th July 1842, aged 12 years, 
2 months and 6 days. 


This tablet is raised to the Memory of Jane, 
daughter of David Andrew, Esq. who departed 
this life 11th day of April 1831, at Mulnaut, 
aged 1 year, 3 months and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane Isabella, 
eldest daughter of Helen and Francis Harris, Esq. 
who departed this life May 14th, 1831, 
aged 3 years, 4 months, 8 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of David Edward, 
second son of Helen and Francis Harris, Esq. 
who departed this life March 4th 1840, 
aged 2 years, 3 months and 22 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 
only daughter of the late Joseph Bird, Esq. 
of the Dooria Factory, Tirhoot, who departed 
this life 21st March 1844, aged 21 years. 

In Memory of William, infant son of 
W. F. and Marian Fergusson, who died on the 
23d June 1834, aged 9 months and 23 days. 
His parents have placed this stone. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Colonel Thomas Robertson, 

of the corps of Engineers, who departed this life 
on the 8tli of June 1831. He entered the service 
in the year 1781, and was engaged in most of 
Lord Lake’s Campaigns, and died, having comple- 
ted a period of service of 50 years of 
unblemished reputation and acknowledged zeal 
and integrity ; esteemed and respected for his 
talents, and beloved for his private worth and 
benevolent dispositions. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Pattenson, Esq. 

FI. C. Civil Service, who departed this life on the 
1st Jan. 1831, aged 54 years 6 months. 

His last hours were soothed by a cheerful hope 
and unwavering trust in the mercy of God 
and Christ. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Smith, Esq. 
of Drongan, in the county of Ayr, Senior member . 
of the firm of Fergusson & Co. of this city, who 
died of cholera on the 3rd December 1830, aged 
44 years and 5 months. 

As a friend, warm and sincere ; as a merchant, j 
honourable and upright ; in every relation of life, 
kind, liberal and generous, his loss will long 
be regretted by all who knew him. 



Sacred to the Memory of 
Cudbert Thornhill Glass, Esq. 
of the Hon’ble Company’s Civil Service on their I 
Bengal establishment, and eldest son of Lieut, i 
Col. Glass of St. Andrews, Fifeshire, North 
Britain, and formerly of the Bengal Artillery, who 
departed this life 14th December 1830, 
aged 37 years. 


Francis Howard V/hite, 

Obit 26th November 1830, iEtat 21. 


Solomonis Hamilton, 

Armigeri Advocati Hoc Monumento memoriam i 
Coluit Liberorum Amor Natus in Hibernia, j ■ 
September MDCCLIII. Obiit eheu Calcutta, Mul-J 
tis amatas dinque deflendus Mort MDCCCXX. j ] 

To the Memory of the Rev. J. P. Nugent, 
who died the 29th September 1819, 
aged 45 years. 


Here lieth the body of 
Mrs. Catherine Elizabeth Swinhoe, 

wife of John Henry Swunhoe, Esq. and daughteil i 
of Robert Penny, Esq. of Weymouth, 
Dorsetshire, who departed this life 28th June 
1820, aged 25 years and 10 months. 

To a mind highly cultivated and to those 
ornamental accomplishments valuable to society,; f 
the deceased in an eminent degree added 
unaffected piety. Though formed by education ami if 
sweetness of disposition to adorn and add zest I o 
to the more brilliant and higher circles of life, sli I 
fully proved herself the amiable and dutiful 
daughter the dear and affectionate w ife, the , 
most truly attentive and tender mother, and the , 
ever kind sister. This pillar is erected by her grate n 
ful husband, who, as he appreciated her worth 
while living, w T ill ever cherish the most sincere re , 
gard for her memory, and who looks forward 
with fond and humble hope through the mercy ol 
Providence to a joyful reunion in that world 
where sorrow is not known. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Henry Swinhoe, Esq. 
late officiating solicitor to the H. E. I. Compan 
at Calcutta, born on the 3rd February 1794, 
died on the 13th October 1837. 

He was a generous and an honest man, and has 
left many who well knew his worth to deplore hi 
early death. This pillar is erected by his 
afflicted brother, T. B. Swinhoe. 


Sacred to the Memory Alice Cooke, 
Daughter of Captain Jno. and Elizabeth Marif 
Cooke, of Calcutta. 

This amiable and truly affectionate young wonia 
was torn from her afflicted parents and family 
at the early age of 1 7 years, 6 months and 2 day; 
on the 21st of October 1819. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of 

an affectionate wife, mother of 15 children, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Marie Cooke, 

dio after a painful illness of 4 months which, she 
bore with exemplary patience and fortitude, 
departed this life on the 25th October 1827, 
aged 52 years, 5 months, 15 days, 
iteaving a husband and ten children to bewail her 
irreparable loss. Also of Joseph, her eldest son, 
who left the Calcutta Pilot, March 1820, in 
command of “ Fatalmaine,” bound to Bussorali, 
and was never after heard of. 

Llso of Elizabeth, her eldest daughter and infant, 
perished with her husband Captain Auldjo, 
Commanding the Bombay ship “ Alexander,” in 
he English channel. Also of Henry, her second 
son, who died at School when in England for his 
education. Also of John, her third son, who 
died in infancy. 


Also to the Memory of Captain John Cooke, 
Born in the county of Suffolk, 4th November 
764, and died at Calcutta, by a sudden attack of 
cholera, on the 13th May 1828, aged 63 years, 
6 months 9 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Harriet Adelaide, 
scond daughter of Captain William and Harriet 
Clarke, died 13th January 1829, aged 10 
months and 20 days. 

Happy infant ! early blest ! 

Rest in peaceful slumber, rest, 

Early rescued from the cares, 

Which increase with growing years. 

The infant daughter of D. McF. and M. A. 
McF. aged 2 months and 18 days, 
died 18th March 1832. 

On the 2nd Nov. 1838, were interred twins, 
a boy and girl born prematurely. 


On the 1st Dec. 1843, was interred Robert, 
•their infant brother, aged 1 month and 10 days. 


Here rest the mortal remains of 
Marianne Matilda Lindstedt, 

the beloved wife ofChas. Wm. Lindstedt, 
who departed this life on the 15th June A. D. 

1820, aged 21 years and 10 months. 

In gratitude to whose memory and in testimony 
of his conjugal love and esteem, 
this monument is erected by her faithful 
and disconsolate husband. Farewell ! my loved 
.darianne, though this mouldering tomb may for a 
while preserve the memory of thy name, 
yet the recollection of thy virtues will ever live 
in the hearts of thy fond husband and friends. 


To the Memory of 
Charles William Lindstedt, 

eldest son of Lieutenant William Lindstedt, 
H. C. European Regiment, 
and Deputy Register, Military Department. 
Born 18th May 1788, Died 11th August 1844, 
aEtat 56 years, 3 months and 1 day. 

“ Thy will be done.” 


In Memory of 

Marianne Rose Lindstedt, 

second daughter of the late C. W. Lindstedt, 
who died 12th August 1845, 
aged 20 years, 1 month and 2 days. 
Humble, unaffected and pious in person, 


comely, and for virtue loved, she blossomed here to 
bright maturity, then by her pleased and 
pitying Redeemer was snatched through bi lei 
mortal suffering to bloom for ever in the 
mansions of the blest. 

Father, thy gracious hand we own, 

And bow submissive to thy rod ; 

That must be wise which Thou hast done, 

It must be kind, for “ Thou art God.” 


In Memory of Robert Gregory Morris, Esq. 

of the Bombay Civil Service, 
who died in Fort William, 19th October 1819, 
in the 27th year of his age. 

To record his virtues and their loss, 
this monument is erected by those to whom he 
was in life a tender and most affectionate brother. 

Alas ! my brother. 

J. C. M., G. J. M., and W. R. M. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Frances Alice 'Williams, 

sixth daughter of Mrs. M. Williams, who died 
25th Jan. 1833, aged 25 years and 3 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Louisa Elizabeth 'Williams, 

who departed this life on the 4th January 1820, 
aged 16 years and 27 days. 

This monument is erected by a fond 
and bereaved mother to whom and to her six 
affectionate sisters, as well as to a large circle of 
relations and friends, 

This departed child had endeared herself by the 
urbanity of her manners and amiable disposition. 

“ Let them not grieve as those without hope.” 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Williams, 

widow of the late Mr. Robt. Williams, 
who departed this life on the 29th October 1829, 
aged 57 years, 10 months and 13 days. 

This monument is erected 
by five surviving daughters, as a small tribute 
of affection to a fond and kind parent. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jane Caroline Hudson, 
the beloved wife of Captain John Hudson, 
who departed this life on the 3rd October 1829, 
aged 27 years, 7 months and 14 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Nathaniel John Hudson, 

the eldest and beloved son of 
Nathaniel and Margaret Hudson, 
who departed this life on the 30th Sept. 1842, 
aged 24 years and 1 1 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Nathaniel Hudson, 
who departed this life on the 5th July 1846, 
aged 51 years and 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Edward Hudson, Esq. 
who departed this life at Calcutta on the 23rd 
April 1839, aged 36 years, 9 months and 12 days, 
sincerely and deeply regretted. 


112 


SOUTH TARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Bannister Hudson, Esq. 
who departed this life 13th October 1819, 
in the 55th year of his age. 

Robert Rayner Young, 

a Captain in the 27th Regt. of Native Infantry, 
on the E. I. Company’s Bengal Establishment, 
Sub-Assistant Commissary General of the Staff, 
and Officiating Deputy Secretary to the Supreme 
Government in the Military Department. 

He died at Calcutta on the 14th July 1819. 

In the 30th year of his age. 

How much beloved and how much regretted 
all those can tell who knew him 
in public and in private life. 

His sorrowing widow and brothers have erected 
this memorial of past happiness. 

Sophia, John, James, and William. 


To the Memory of 
Arthur Jacob Macan, 

who departed this life on the 19th Sept. 1819, 
aged 45 years. 

With a pure and steadfast faith in the tenets of the 
Gospel, he endeavoured in every situation 
to make his actions accord with its divine precepts, 
and devoted his time, his talents and his 
fortune to relieve the distressed, 
and to encourage virtue and piety, of which he was 
a bright but unostentatious example. 

Sacred to the Memory of Richard Chase, Esq. 
of the H. C. Civil Service, 
who departed this life 24th November 1819, 
aged 24 years. 


A tribute of friendship, 
this Monument is erected to the Memory of 
Henry Taylor, Esq. of the H. C. Civil Service, 
who expired on the 23d day of June 1820, 
at the early age of 24 years, 
most deeply and sincerely lamented. 


To the Memory of James Steuart, Esq. 
seventh son of David Steuart, Esq. of Edinburgh, 
and late a Lieut, of H. M. S. “ Ilebrus.” 

He died 11th April 1820, 
at the early age of 25 years. 

John Robert, and Thomas David Steuart 
have caused this memorial of a beloved brother 
to be erected. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Roebuck, 
Captain in the Madras N. Infantry, 
and Examiner in the Hindostanee, Bruj Bhasha, 
Persian and Arabic Languages, 
in the College of Fort William. 

Born December 1784, deceased December 1819. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Benjamin Barons, 

Born at Cheshunt in Hertfordshire, 27th July 
1764, Obit. 5th March 1820, 
after a residence of 36 years in India. 

He hoped for salvation through Christ Jesus. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Barons, 

died 26th June 1832, aged 57 years. 

To the Memory of Miss Harriet Barons, 
Obit. 12th December 1841, /Etat, 48 years. 
Loved in life and lamented in death. 


To the Memory of Hugh Inglis Ker, 

a Captain in the 7th Regt. B. N. Cavalry, 
who died at Bourdah in Baitool, on the 20th 
Dec. 1818, in his 30th year. 
Distinguished for gallantry in the field, 
beloved and honored in all the 
relations of private life. 

This tablet on his brother’s tomb is consecrated. 


Erected in Memory of Robert Ker, 
one of the Civil Servants of the East India 
Company on the Bengal Establishment, 
who died on the 3d Dec. 1819, aged 45 years. 

During a service of 22 years Mr. Ker 
passed through various situations of trust and 
difficulty, in all evincing an admirable strictness of 
principle, soundness of judgment and force 
of character. Able, laborious and 
independent, anxious only for the public interests ; | 
expecting reputation and favor solely through j 
the discharge of public duty, 
gaining both unsolicited. In 1814 Mr. Ker 
was selected to fill a seat in the Supreme 
Native Court at this Presidency ; the unanimous 
choice of his fellows directed the choice. 

His excellent administration honored it. 

In 1818 unhappy disturbances agitating Cuttack, i 
Mr. Ker was called to the Civil administration of 
the province, in which while yet a 
youth, he had by a just and wise government 
eminently raised the British name and 
powerfully attached the affections of a newly 
conquered people, for the public good, 
readily sacrificing his personal comforts. 

He freely exposed himself, labouring under disease, 
in an unhealthy climate, and fell a victim 
to public duty, having, to the province committed 1 1 
to his charge, restored peace, security and order. 1 i 
The virtues of Mr. Ker in private life were 
not less distinguished than his merits as a public ! 

man, and bore the same stamp of unaffected 
truth and unpretending sincerity. Kind, generous, j | 
humane and warm-hearted, 

Never was one more dearly loved ; 

Never more deeply lamented. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Mansfield, j 
died on the 11th June 1821, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Barnes, 
who departed this life on the 8th of Dec. 1821, 
aged 47 years. 

God my Redeemer lives, 

And often from the skies 

Looks down and watches all my dust, 

Till he shall bid it rise. 




This tomb is erected as a token of affection by his j 
disconsolate widow, Margaret Barnes. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Rliza Anne Lowrie, 
who died 25th July 1820, aged 22 years, 

3 months and 25 days. 


To the Memory of Miss Frances Morrell, 
who departed this life 2d October 1819, 
aged 20 years. 


William Irwin, 

infant son of Paul Marriot Wynch, Esq. B. C. S. 
born 21st Feb. 1828, died 5th June 1828, 
aged 3 months 15 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Mans Jensen, 

1 native of Copenhagen, who departed this life 
on the 31st Oct. 1820, aged 35 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Bag-nail, 
who departed this life 19th November 1821, 
agqd 38 years. 

This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
husband, Richard Bagnall. 

Sacred to the Memory of Richard Bagnall, 
senior Pensioner of the Military and Police Office, 
died 8th February 1847, aged 72 years, 

10 months and 22 days. 

This tablet is placed by his afflicted widow. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Bagnall, 
who died 6th April 1844, aged 25 years, 

7 months and 20 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. F. G. Stacy, 
died 25th August 1831, aged 31 years. 


Ind of his son, Augustus Thomas, died 18th 
Dec. 1831, aged 4 years, 4 months, 10 days. 
Not lost but gone before. 


Within are deposited the remains of 
Sarah Frances Rosalinda, 
the dearly loved wife of 
The Rev. Henry Pratt, M. A. Chaplain to the 
Hon’ble Company, 

ied 4th January 1831, aged 28 years 11 months. 

Few ever possessed so high a sense of her 
elative duties. None ever performed them more 
conscientiously. 

The above was the eldest daughter of 
James and Sarah Hall, 

Grove house, Willesdon, Middlesex, England. 

'orgive, blest shade, the tributary tear 
.’hat mourns thy exit from a world like this, 
forgive the wish that would have kept thee here, 
aid stay’d thy progress to the seats of bliss, 
lo more confin’d to grov’ling scenes of night, 
lo more a tenant pent in mortal clay, 
low should I rather hail thy glorious flight 
aid trace thy journey to the realms of day. 


In Memoir of Mrs. Anne Iiedlie Pratt, 

who died 28th April 1831, aged 31 years. 
Also, Agnes McLean Pratt, 
who died 17th November 1831, aged 12 years. 
The beloved wife and affectionate daughter of 
C. M. Pratt. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Cripps, H. C. Marine, 
departed this life 6th April A. D. 1831, aged 26 
years. In death lamented as in life beloved. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Catherine Penman, who departed this life 
on the 7th April 1831, aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William James Alexander Duncan 

formerly of Madras, and late of Calcutta,’ 
who departed this life 13th April A. D. 1831, 
aged 34 years and 10 days, 
deeply and sincerely regretted by a numerous 
circle of friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. James Hector, ol the barque Diederick a, 
who departed this life on the 10th April 1831, 
aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Iiathbury Turner, of Exeter, 
many years resident at Colgong, 
who departed this life Jan. 19, 1832, aged 48 yrs. 
leaving his widow & 7 children to deplore his loss. 


To the Memory of 

The Hon. Henry Davenport Shakespear, Esq. 

Member of the Supreme Council of India, 
who died March 20, 1838, in the 53dyear of his age. 
Also of two infant daughters of the above, 
and Louisa his wife — Annette, 
who died Feb. 19, 1832, aged 4 ms. and 19 days. 
And Amelia Anne, who died March 8, 1838, 
aged 1 year, 1 month and 27 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. George Eves, 
died 18th April 1832, aged 42 years, 
esteemed and beloved by all who had the pleasure 
of his acquaintance. 


Sacred to the Memory ofW'alter, 
infant son of H. S. Lane, Esq. of the Civil Service, 
who died Oct. 30, 1832, aged 2 ms. and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of ’William Crump, 
who departed this life on the 13th December 1832, 
aged 45 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Johanna, 
the beloved wife of Captain J. Satchwell, 
Assistant Commissary General, 
who departed this life 4th January 1833, 
at the premature age of 26 years, 
deeply lamented by her afflicted husband, children, 
relations and friends. 


Under this Monument 
is deposited all that was mortal of Tempe, 
late the affectionate wife of Edward S. Ellis, 
died 1st November 1820, 
deeply lamented by her afflicted husband. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Thellusson, Esq. 
of the Hon’ble Company’s Civil Service, 
who died at Calcutta on the 15th day of Nov. 1820, 
in the 21st year of his age. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Dyer, Esq. Superintending Surgeon, 
who departed this life on the 16th Dec. 1820, 
aged 56 years. 

To the Memory of Edward Millett, 
born 29th Aug. 1801, died 15th Feb. 1821, 
aged 19 yeai-s. 


To the Memory of James Hales, 

Captain in the H. C. 21st Regt. Native Infantry, 
who died the 18th Dec. 1820, aged 35 years. 
Esteemed and regretted. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Ives Bosanquet, Esq. 
who departed this life 20th December 1820 
aged 26 years, 11 months and 4 days.t 


144 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Chasten Assey, Esq. 
of the Medical Establishment of this Presidency, 
and Chief Secretary to the British Govt, of Java, 
until the restoration of that Island. 

He died at Calcutta, 21st March 1321, 
aged 41 years. 

Esteemed for his talents, beloved for his virtues. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. El enry Alston, 
who died on the 30th March 1821, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memories of Robert Evans, 
died 11th April A. D. 1821, aged 53 years, 

3 months. 

And his son Edward, 

who departed this life on the 26th day of July 
A. D. 1823, aged 13 years, 2 months. 

Entomb’d within this humble cell doth lie, 
Entwin’d in love and affectionate tie, 

A father and a son, to whose mem’ries dear, 
Have often been shed full many a tear ! 

To relate whose virtues, and living worth, 
Would seem to bestow on flattery birth ; 
Suffice it then to say that each was kind, 

Of manners gentle and unerring mind. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
hi rs. Margaret Jones, 

who departed this life Dec. 16th, 1829, 
aged 31 years and 5 months. 

This is dedicated to an affectionate wife, by her 
husband, R. E. Jones, in grateful remem- 
brance of her kindness of heart. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Eastis Jones, 

who departed this life August 30th, 1832, 
aged 45 years. 

This tablet is erected by his affectionate wife, 
Agnes Jones. 


Here lies the remains of 
a much beloved and lamented child, 

Richard Goss, 

the infant son of Richard Easties and Elizabeth 
Jones, who departed this life June 27th, 1820, 
of that dreadful disorder the Hydrophobia, 
having been bitten by a piah dog, three months 
before his death, aged 3 yrs. 5 mths. and 25 dys. 
Sweet Innocent ! thy pure soul will certainly 
be received by thy Creator and enter 
into the joy of thy Lord, which is the best conso- 
lation left to thy parents. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Elde Barby, Esq. 
who departed this life the 24th August 1820, 
aged 44 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
W. R. B. Bennett, Esq. 
of the H. C. Civil Service, who departed this life 
on the 28th of June 1820, aged 34 years. 


To the Memory of Mr. John Ellerton, 
of Malda, who departed this life 16th of 
Sept. 1820, aged 52 years and 7 months. 

His Mem ory is ble ss e d . 

“ To him to live was Christ, to die was gain.” 
“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 
They rest from their labours and their works 
follow them.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain W. B. Robert, II. M. 17th Regt. 
who departed this life June 30th, 1820, 
aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Fulton Meade, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 29th August 1820, 
aged 17 years. 


Also of Christopher Meade, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 1st of May 1823, 
aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. John "Walker, 

1st Battalion 11th Regiment N. I. who departed 
this life on the 7th day of June 1820, 
aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
J. R. de Beauregard, Esq. 

Captain 2d Bengal Native Infantry, Obit. 25th 
May 1820, Ait. 34 years. 

He was a good soldier and an honest friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Anthony Coss, 
who departed this life on the 12th February 1826, 
aged 64 years. 

To the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, 
who departed this life Nov. 14th, 1822, aged 23 yrs. 
This is a tribute of sincere regard 
to an affectionate wife. 


Also to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Keyse, 
Brother-in-law to R. E. Jones, who departed 
this life June 15th, 1821, aged 34 years. 


Erected to the Memory of 
Edward Cornls. Frederick Pike, Esq. 
by two friends who knew his worth. He died 
on the 10th June, 1819, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Margaret, 
the beloved wife of Robert Campbell, Esq. 
whose virtues in the various relations of life 
eminently endeared her to the whole circle of 
her friends, and all who knew her. 

Her gentle, affectionate and pure spirit, 
associated as it was with an artless, heartfelt piety, 
justifies the hope that thro’ the Divine mercy 
of her ever blessed Redeemer 
her faith will have been accepted of God. 
Died 5th April 1820, aged 40 years and 7 months. 

Also to the Memory of Robert Campbell, Esq. 
who survived her only a few months. 

He died on the 3rd September 1820, aged 52, 
having endured with the fortitude and 
resignation of a good Christian, a series 
of misfortunes for many years. 


J 






i 










1 


I lus Monument in testimony of sincere reg'avd 
to the Memory of Henry Christopher, Esq. 
late Commander of the Ship “ Charles Mills,” 
who died in the 48th year of his age at Budge 
Budge, on the 11th July, A. D. 1817. 

Is erected by those of his friends who were 
enabled to appreciate those many manly virtues 
which characterized him thro’ life as an 
officer and a man. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Alicia, 
wife of William Leycester, Esq. 
of the Civil Service. 

Her many virtues, her sense of religion ; 
her practical devotion ; the sympathy she ever 
felt in the sorrows of others ; 
her exertions to soothe and relieve them ; 
he deep regret of her many valued friends and 
relatives ; her exemplary conduct in every 
vicissitude of life ; the kindness of her domestic 
habits ; her unceasing maternal vigilance ; 
the unshaken confidence and affection which 
ver united her to the bosom of a grieving husband, 
afford him the strongest hope, under heaven, 
that thro’ the mediation of our blessed Saviour 
and Redeemer, she may be received into bliss 
eternal and happiness for ever. Amen. 

Born 2d Sept. 1784 ; Died 23d Sept. 1821, 
aged 37 years. 

Lere lie deposited by the side of a sister who was 
ever dear to her heart, the remains of 

Henrietta, 

he devotedly attached and tenderly beloved wife 
of Duncan Mcleod, Lt.-Col. of Engineers, 
whose grief for his own loss, is 
deeply enhanced by the reflection that 
is children have in her sustained the irreparable 
privation of an affectionate and most judicious 
mother. Born 7th Oct. 1782; Died 28th 
Nov. 1830. 


In Memory of Charlotte Leycester Gordon, 

the dearly loved child of George Gordon 
lacpherson, Esq. Bengal Medical Establishment, 
and Charlotte his wife. 

lorn 10th September 1838, died 5th Jan. 1840. 
“ Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
orbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of 
Heaven.” 


To the Memory of Walter Davidson, 

A Member of the Mercantile Firm of 
Hogue Davidson and Robertson, 
ho died on the 12th Sept. 1820, aged 40 years, 
sincerely lamented by all who had a 
knowledge of his worth. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. William Torbes, R. N. 

Aged 25 years, son of Sir William Forbes of 
fraigivar, Baronet. Calcutta 4th October 1820. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Simson, 
third son of George Simson, Esq. of Fifeshire, 
10 died at Calcutta on the 19th September 1820, 
aged 21 years. 

His days were few, but rich in the promise of 
ture excellence ; his affectionate warmth of heart, 
his candid and generous temper ; his honest 
ambition and rising talents formed in his life 
he pride and the delight of his family and his 
riends, and the recollection of his steadfastness 
in the principles of Christianity 
forbids that those who survive to mourn 
for him should sorrow as without hope or 
consolation. 


acred to the Memory of Eliza MacDowell, 
(wife of Captain MacDowell, Bengal Artillery, ’ 
who departed this life 
on the 30th October 1820, aged 30 years, 
u 


Here lie interred the mortal remains of 
Rebecca Bagsliaw, aged 37 years. 

Also of Catharine Bagshaw, aged 16 years. 
The wife and eldest daughter of 
John Bagshaw, Esq. of Calcutta, who 
on the 19th Oct. 1820, were in one sad moment 
drowned by the upsetting of a pinnace 
near the Armenian Ghaut. 

The afflicted husband and father, suddenly 
bereaved of the beloved objects of his affection, 
looks forward thro’ the merits of his Redeemer 
to a re-union with them in a better world, 
and desires at once to learn and enforce 
upon others this lesson of wisdom ; 

“ Boast not thyself of to-morrow, for thou 
knowest not what a day may bring forth.” — 
Prov. 27. 1. 


This perishable Monument 
covers the revered remains of the late 
George Ewan Law, Esq., 
of the Civil Service of Bengal. 

Natus the 28th October 1796. 

Obit, the 6th day of November A. D. 1820, 
TEtatis 24 years 

Erected by J. and C. Hayes, as a 
faint memento of their unceasing affection 
for the irreparable loss of their justly beloved 
and truly virtuous son-in-law, 1821. 


Buried here are the remains of 
George Ewan Law, Esq. 

Late Principal Assistant in the Secret and Politi- 
cal department of the Government at Calcutta, &c. 
He was the third son of Ewan Law, Esquire, of 
Horsted place in the county of Sussex, 
formerly for many years chief of the Provincial 
Council at Patna. He was educated at 
Westminster School, and he married Charlotte, 
eldest daughter of Commodore John Hayes, 
Master Attendant of the Port of Calcutta, 
by whom he left two sons and a daughter. He was 
born on the 28th of October 1796, and died 
the 6th of November 1820, aged 24 years. 

No common sorrow lingers on his early grave ; 
tears from the deepest sources of affection honor 
the memory of one who possessed an extra- 
ordinary share of human excellence ; of strong 
and pure attachments, of noble and generous spirit 
of mild and modest manners ; with a clear and 
powerful understanding ; with an elegant and 
richly informed mind, firm in principle, zealous in 
action, he was marked from early youth as one 
that should reflect honour upon his family and his 
country. It pleased God to shorten his 
earthly pilgrimage yet so long was he spared as to 
have fulfilled the duties of each domestic 
obligation, and to be distinguished as an able 
servant of the public interests with that grateful 
sense of the mercies of Christianity which 
characterized his course through life. He resigned 
himself in death humbly and readily to the 
will of the Almighty. This tablet is placed by his 
unhappy widow a Monument of his virtues 
and of the unbounded affection and respect. 


Master Thomas Thompson, 

Born 15th July 1805, died 17th July 1805. 
Mr. Thomas Thompson, 

Died the 24th February 1807, aged 25. 
Mr. Richard Gatton, ° 

Died the 22d May 1815, aged 39 years. 




146 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Here lieth the body of Irwin Lewis Rees, 
Son of John Mitford and Harriet Anne Rees, died 
10th December 1818, iEtatis 1 month and 
28 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth TVhite, 
Died (universally beloved for the sauvity of her 
disposition) on the 11th Sept, 1822, aged 33 years. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth and in whom 
I believe.” Her last words were “ I shall be a 
prisoner three hours longer.” 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Dow j 
born on the 12th of Oct. 1799, and died on the 
6th of May 1828, aged 28 years, 6 months, 
and 24 days. 


The flower just nipped as it began to blossom in 
the parents’ view. 

In memory of James Brightman Bow, 

Aged 11 months and 14 days, died 24 March 1824. 


Mr. Edward Brightman, 

departed this life after residing 39 years in India, 
on the 24th of February 1791, aged LXIII years. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Mary Brightman, 
wife of Mr. Edward Brightman, who departed 
tliis life on the 23rd February 1808, 
aged 21 years. 

Also of Mr. John Jaques Brightman, 

who departed this life on the 12th August 1807, 
aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward Brightman, Esq. 

For many years a merchant of this city, Obit 26th 
December 1833, aged 52 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Brightman, 

who departed this life on the 21st March 1801, 
aged 19 years. 

Too early lost ! just in thy bloom of youth, 

Go noblest pattern of unshaken truth, 

Absolv’d from earth, that peaceful shore ascend, 
Where angels live and to their Maker bend. 


The infant son of S. Swinton, Esq. 

Nat. 28th August 1809, Obit. 28th August 1810, 
James, the infant son of 

Samuel Swinton, Esq. of the H. C. Service, born 
2nd September 1822, died 24th September 1822. 


In Memory of Master J. P. Tulloh, 
died 23rd May 1825, aged 15 years 6 months. 


Here lies interred the remains of 

Eleanor Watson, 

born 6th May 1751, and died the 19th of 
October, 1776. 


And also of Samuel "Watson, her son, 
born 11th of October and died the 25th. 


Here also lyeth ye body of 
Mrs. Mary Chapman, 
who departed this life on ye 23 of January, 
in ye year of our Lord 1784, aged 63 years. 
Universally lamented by all that knew her ; being 
a pattern of virtue, piety, charity, and friendship. 
No empty form of words are here express’d, 

But simple truth as it’s by nature dress’d. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Terrence Kavanagh, died April 14thl82l, 
aged 44 years, 7 months and 8 days. 


Also John Kavanagh, 

aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Tulloh, 
Born at Campbleton near Fort George, Invernes- 
shire, North Britain. — Obit 29th August 1819, 
aged 44 years. 


In Memory of Miss Mary Taylor, 
Obit 18th August 1832, aged 52 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of the late 

Mr. James Wade, 

A native of Waterford, Ireland, and many years 
Senior Branch Pilot on this establishment, who , 
departed this life on the 22nd day of April 1819. 
aged 75 years. 

Intelligent in his profession, and intrepid in mind, i 
he by his personal exertions saved the lives of 
many, and in society he was highly esteemed for a 
his honest heart and liberal hand, which were 
always open to his friends and the poor. 

May he rest in peace. 


Sacred to the Memory of Horatio Turner, Esq. 
Obit 27th February Its 13, Ait. 62 years. * 
Many years in the Civil Service of the India 
Company at Bencoolen. 

Also on the north side of this Tomb, 

Mrs. Pamela Turner, 

Relict of the above, Obit 14th May 1S16, 
Ait. 64 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of A. H. Irvine, 
who died 13tli February 1818, aged 23 days. 


In this grave were enterred the remains of two 
children, Amelia Johnston Harington, born 
16th April 1809, and died the 7th June 1811. 
William Thomason Harington, born 
2nd October 1811, died 10th August 1812. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid 
them not, for of such is the kingdom of God.” 
Mark xv. 14. 

In the vault beneath are deposited the remains of 
Captain Herbert Hawes, 
formerly of the East India Company’s Service, 
who departed this life on the 5th October 1832, 
aged 52 years. 

An honest man, in life respected, in death lamented. 


Sacred to the Memory of Rev. David Brown, 
who was ten years Senior Chaplain at the Presi- 
dency and Provost of the College of Fort 
William ; he also held in trust the ministry of th 
Old Church one and twenty years. He died 
June 14th, 1812, aged 48 years. 

The Memory of the just is blessed. 






In Memory of Frances Cowley, 

Daughter of the Rev. David Brown, and of 
Frances his wife ; she died March 3rd, 1824, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss M. A. R. Sevestre, 
who died 31st March 1816, aged 1 year, 6 montl 
and 16 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. U7 


SaCFed to the Memory of William Layton, 
who died the 31st January 18 1C. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Susannah Morrison, 
wife of George Morrison, who departed this life 
on the 3rd of October 1809, aged 28. 
Affection’s last sad tribute. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jessy Scott, 
•elict of the late James Scott, Esq. ; she departed 
his life on the 25th November 1818, in the Fifty- 
sixth year of her age. The virtues of humanity 
wefe possessed by her in an eminent degree, and 
her ptire and intelligent mind was ennobled by a 
heart warm, generous and sincere, which rendered 
her esteemed and respected by all who knew 
ier. This Monument is erected over her remains 
by her affectionate brother, John Hunter. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Wells, 
the beloved wife of Mr. Joseph Wells, of the 
Pilot Service, who departed this life on the 17th of 
June 1844, aged 35 years and 3 months, 
sincerely regretted. And also of their infant son 
James Tavenor "Wells, 
who departed this life on the 16th September 
1843, aged 5 months and 16 days. 


Great Arbiter of life and death, 

I bow to thy decree, 

From thee first came the vital breath, 
I yield again to thee. 

Thou who canst clear the darkest day, 
Or cloud the brightest sun, 

Grant me submission still to say, 

“ Thy work, O Lord, be done.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph Wells, 
..ate Branch Pilot in the H. Co.’s Marine, who was 
suddenly snatched from the bosom of his friends 
after bearing with Christian-like fortitude for 
seven months, a painful trial of his Maker’s will, 
leaving behind him a disconsolate widow and 
even young children to lament his untimely loss. 

i low blest that man who in retirement does find, 
’'he soft endearments of his bosomed friends, 
Vhose social virtues lightens o’er his mind, 

Tith Christian fortitude against the world con- 
tends. 

luch was the partner of my worldly care, 
inch was the father of our dearest pledge, 

But death relentless teaches to beware, 

The fleeting joys that fill our transcient age. 


Died 21st March 1823, aged 42 years and 3 ms. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Wells, 
)f the H. C. Marine, who departed this life on the 
3 1st August 1833, aged 22 years and 8 days. 


Mary Clarissa, the beloved daughter of 
Joseph and Mary Wells, who departed this life 
24th July 1835, aged 15 months and 8 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Here lieth the infant son of 

Mr. H. T. Metcalfe, 

died the 29th day of December 1812, aged eleven 
months and twenty days. “ Of such is the 
kingdom of heaven.” 

u 2 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Alice Saunders, 
who departed this life 21st of May 1813, 
aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Saunders, 
died 24th of May 1829, aged 75 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Samuel Saunders, 
assistant at the M. A. G. office, who departed 
this life milch respected and lamented, November 
20th, in the year of our Lord 1809, 
aged 22 years, 6 months and 27 days. 

A dutiful son and an affectionate mother, whose 
amiable and benevolent disposition endeared him 
to all who knew him. 

When blooming youth is snatch’d away 
By death’s resistless hand, 

Our hearts the mournful tribute pay 
Which pity must demand ; 

But why bemoan departing friends 
Or shake at death's alarms, 

’Tis but the voice that Jesus sends 
To call them to his arms. 

Why then their loss deplore, they are not lost 
Why wanders wretched thought their tombs around 
All, all on earth is shadow 
All beyond is substance, 

How populous ! How vital is the grave ! 

This is creation’s melancholy vault, 

This is the desert, this the solitude ; 

The land of apparitions, empty shades, 

How solid all where change shall be no more. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Sampson, 
who departed this life 7th Novr. 1809, aged 56. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret Ina, 
who departed this life on the 30th January 1810, 
aged 45. 


Captain John Clement, of the Country Service, 
died 10th August, 1812. 


Sacred to the Memory of Joshua Elston, 
who departed this life 16th September 1813, 
aged 44 years, 

who was generous, benevolent and humane, 
possessing a mind adorned with many branches of 
scientific knowledge ; and a heart dilated 
with many social and manly virtues, who devoted 
the chief part of a life of industry, skill and 
ingenuity to the service of his fellow-creatures, 
endeared by his varied talents and amiable qualities 
to his family and friends. He lived wfith 
independent fortitude, respected as a philosopher, 
and died with Christian piety ; lamented as a 
philanthropist, this Monument is erected by his 
disconsolate Widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Isaac Golledge, 
Assistant Deputy Master Attendant, who 
departed this life on the 2d of April 1802, 
aged 44 years. 

An upright honest man, beloved and lamented by 
all who knew him. 


And also to the Memory of Mr. John Golledge 
son of the above, who departed this life on 
the 15th July 1824, aged 22 years. 



148 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Francis Lemesle, 
who departed this life the 19th October 1822, 
aged 77 years. 

He was steward for upwards of 27 years to the 
following Governors and Governors General 
formerly in Bengal : — 

The Right Hon’ble Earl Cornwallis, K. G. ; 
Sir John Shore, Bt. ; the Most Noble Marquis 
Wellesley, K. G. ; Sir G. H. Barlow, Bt. ; the 
Most Noble Marquis Cornwallis, K. G. and 
Gilbert Lord Minto. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. Pereira, 
who departed this life on the 8th of January 1822, 
Ait. 43 years, 

much regretted by all who knew her. 

“ Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord 
This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
friend, Mr. F. Lemesle. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Hannah Dent, 

Obit 26th February 1817, /Etat 49 years and half. 
Also of Elizabeth Catharine her daughter, 
aged one month. Likewise to 
Chas. Wm. Gibson, Esq. 

Obiit. 27th Sept. 1817, Ait. 47 years and half. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Sophia Athanass, 

daughter of John Athanass, who departed this life 
on the 19th May 1797, aged G years, 

10 months and 3 days. 


Cecilia, the infant daughter of 
Robert W. Poe, Esq. born 21st Nov. 1819, 
died on the same day. 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry, 
the infant son of Captain H. Heyman, H. M. S. 

and Eliza his wife, who departed thi^life 
20th Oct. 1832, aged 1 yr. 1 month and 18 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Thomas George Clarke, 

who departed this life on the 17th August 1825, 
aged 7 months and 22 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of James Edward, 
the son of James Colvin, Esq. who died 13th 
Dec. 1814, aged 2 months and 8 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of William James, 
the infant son of Robert and Eliza Strickland, J 
died July 2d, 1828, aged 4 months and 11 days, i 


Also 

Sacred to the Memory of Thos. Ross Dent, Esq. 
who departed this life the 4th February 1821, 
aged 47 years and 11 months. 


Within this tomb is interred the body of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Gibson, 
eldest daughter of Thomas Pelling, Esq. 
of Madras, Free Merchant, who departed this life 
on the nineteenth day of May 1801, in her 
fifty-second year. 

Her parents experienced in her a dutiful daughter, 
her husband a faithful and tender wife, her 
relations an equal and sincere affection, the poor, 
a ready and compassionate supporter, and her 
children a steady friend and affectionate mother. 
With deep sorrow they lament their 
irreparable loss. 

Also sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Thomas Gibson, her husband, 
who was interred near this spot in his thirty- 
second year, on the twenty-fourth day of 
November 1772. 


Sacred to the Memory of departed worth, 

James Scott, Esq. 

who died on the 19th of July 1816, aged 60 years. 


Sacred to the Meftiory of John Athanass, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 1st of Sept. 1835, 
aged 82 years. 

Despising ostentation and happy in retirement, 
the world knew him but little and appreciated 
him less, yet the poor whom that world neglects 
will bless him for those ample provisions, 
which his charity bequeathed to their wants. But 
it was in his family where all his affections 
centered, that his real virtues were displayed. 
Purity, veracity and piety evinced the good- 
ness of his heart, and the sincerity of his faith, and 
led his children to award this testimonial, and 
to love the father and revere the Christian. 


Here lieth the body of George Athanass, 
son of John Athanass, who departed this life the 
20th Sept. 1809, aged 19 years, 11 months, 12 days. 


Thomas Howard Christie, and Sarah 
Christie, 

whose remains are here interred, departed this life, 
the former on the 14th of February 1818, 
aged 5 months and 15 days ; 
the latter on the 1st of July IS 19, aged 8 months 
and 27 days. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade 
Death came with friendly care, 

The opening buds to heaven convey’d, 

And bade them blossom there. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Robert Pirie, 
who departed this life on the 17th of Feb. 1799, 
aged xxxvii. years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Sarah Edwards, 
wife of Richard Bird, Esq. Solicitor, died4ti* 
Sept. 1833, aged 21 years and 11 months. 


A 

;t> 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Dudley Robert Smith, 

(late Lt. and Adjt. of Gardner’s Local Horse.) 

Ob. June 10th A. D. 1826, Ait. 28 years, 

5 months 10 days. An affectionate husband, 
a tender father, a warm and zealous friend. 


r'K 

lui 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Alexander Rogers, 
who departed this life on the 4th of Aug. 1S14, 
aged 50 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of William Lloyd, 
died 6th May 1828, aged 10 months and 6 days 


To the Memory of Thos. Gillanders, Esq. 
died 23d Feb. 1828, aged 59 years. 


I 


To the Memory of James, 
the infant son of Maria Glass, 
who departed this life the 21st October 1816, 
aged 1 year, 3 months and 21 days. 

“ And Jesus said unto them, suffer little children . 
to come unto me and forbid them not, for ol 
such is the kingdom of heaven.” — Mark chap. 
10— v. 14. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


149 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Chas. Williams, 
late architect, died on the 28th November 1824, 
aged 45 years. 

This Monument as a tribute of filial affection 
is erected by his son, A. W. 

In Memory of Master E. A. Lamouroux, 
son of P. A. and Mary Lamouroux, 
who departed this life on the 11th October 1829, 
aged 1 month and 3 days. 

To the Memory of Master H. D. S. Ross, 
died the 30th October 1819, aged 10 months 
and 8 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Herbert Barnes, 

son of Richard and Frances Barnes, 
who departed this life August 12th, 1823, 
aged 7 months and 18 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
bless his holy name.” 


Eliza Picard, 

aged 24, died the 7th of May 1817. 

What tho’ in death’s embrace her body lies 
tier blameless spirit to its Maker flies, 

To taste those joys which heaven alone can give 
And in the presence of her Saviour live. 

Catherine Jones, aged 36. 

Departed this life on the 14th of November 1821. 

Her meek, her blameless soul has wing’d its way 
To meet her God in everlasting day ; 

.n realms of bliss, in endless joy to move, 
Cheer’d by a Saviour’s all redeeming love. 


Sacred to the Memory of Captain John Mills, 
vho for 14 years commanded the H. C.’s Yacht, 
the ‘ Charlotte,’ born in London the 2nd Nov. 
1734, and died on the 13th August 1814, 
aged 69 years, 9 months and 11 days. 

•Sweet shades of departed worth Farewell, 

To bereft of thee, we still love to dwell 
-!)n thy fomk memory, the theme we ne’er can forget 
Until life’s ebb is o’er, until our sun is set. 
Inscribed by the widow and two sons. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Shearman, Esq. 
who departed this life 1st December 1815, 
aged 53 years. 

He was for many years, Register in the Revenue 
Board Office, a worthy, benevolent, humane, phi- 
lantropic character, sincerely beloved in life and 
lamented in death by all who knew him. 

Sacred to the Memory of Frederick Joshua, 
second son of Major Waters and Elizabeth his wife, 
who terminated his short career on the 17 th 
June 1823, aged 7 months and 17 days. 

(Sacred to the Memory of Mr. William Youngs, 
late a branch Pilot in the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 2nd of Sept. 1821, 
aged 48 years and 25 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Margaret Cearas, 
wife of Mr. J. Cearns, Branch Pilot, who de- 
parted this life on the 2nd December 1838, 
aged 40 years and 1 month. 

Also an infant son born 25th December 1828, 
died 30th December 1828, aged 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mrs. Elizabeth Youngs, 

wife of Mr. William Youngs, of the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life April 25th, 1808, 
aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 
wife of Mr. Charles Warden, died 29th Dec. 1825, 
aged 22 years and 28 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Peter Andrew, Junr. 
who departed this life 8th February 1822, 
aged 22 years and 1 month. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Gentloom Aviet, Esq. Junr. 
who departed this life on the 1 3th of 
September A. D. 1836. 

This Monument is erected by his afflicted widow 
in token of her affection and esteem. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Taylor, Jr. 
who departed this life on the 31st July 1834, 
aged 19 years and 2 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Elizabeth Meller , 
who departed this life on the 23d September 
1834, aged 42 years and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Jane Fraser, 
daughter of A. B. and M. A. Fraser, 
who died 2d October 1822, aged 1 year 6 months 
and 22 days. 


Master Frederick Gillanders, 

the infant son of G. R. Gillanders, Esquire, 
Attorney at Law. 

Born 19th March 1833, died 16th Sept. 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Eleanor Cantopher, 

wife of Mr. Robert Cantopher of the Political 
office, born 30th April 1805, Obiit. 22d March 
1829, yEtatis 23 years 10 months and 22 days. 
Excellentissima Sexus. 

As a record of conjugal affection, this tablet is 
inscribed by her grateful and afflicted husband. 

O early snatch’d from all who held her dear 
As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her’s, to earth is seldom giv’n, 

Too good to dwell with us, she 's gone to Heaven. 


Sacred to the Alemory of Mrs. Sarah Mills, 
born 15th November 1790, and departed this life 
8th Alay 1826, aged 35 years, 5 months 
and 23 days. 

She was an affectionate wife, a tender mother, a 
warm friend, a kind mistress and 
a sincere Christian. 

Gentle Reader, if departed worth deserves a tear, 
Stop, and the pious tribute render here. 

Inscribed by her affectionate husband. 


Sacred to theAIemory of Air. H. R. Stout, 
Master in the H. C. Pilot Service, died on the 
6th October 1826, aged 29 years, 5 months 
and 21 days. Also his infant son aged 8 days. 

Airs. Elizabeth Hudson, 

Obiit. October 22d, 1829, aged 35. 



150 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Manuel, 
who departed this life on the 30th October 
1817, aged 15 years. 

This Monument is erected by his Godmother 
Mrs. C. Williams. 


In Memory of George Digby, 

son of John Davison Smith and Caroline his wife, 
who departed this life May 25th, 1827, 
aged 2 years and 3 months. In the same grave 
are deposited the remains of 
Henry, their infant son, 
who died January 28th, 1832 aged 1 month 
and 18 days. 

In the same grave are deposited the remains of 
Chas. Alexander, their infant son, 
who died 2d June 1833, aged 2 mons. and 2 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Thomas Hall, 
infant son of Sarah and Captain John Hall, of the 
Hon’ble Company’s Bombay Marine. Qui Obit 
11th of May A. D. 1817, aged 9 months 5 days. y 


Sleep sweet babe 1 removed from curs’d misfor- 
tunes pow’r, 

Free from the tempest’s blast here rest in peace ; 
Wither’d in its bud, nature’s tend’rest fiow’r, 
Angelic babe, my darling, rest in peace ; 

How few its days, how sure death’s unerring dart, 
(Alas ! soon as the blooming child began,) 

That pierc’d oh its poor little ftutt’ring heart, 
And dash'd a parent’s hope in the growing man. 
Sleep on my babe, for heaven’s all righteous King, 
Hath to lasting summer, chang’d thy short liv’d 
spring. 







Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Hubbard 

died 3d August 1834, aged 27 years. 


Mrs. John Florence, 

died 22d July 1835, aged 38 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Hugh Moor, 
who died 14th Sept. 1834, aged 17 years. 


To the Memory of T. H. ‘Wilkinson, Esq. 
late a Purser of the ship “ Barossa,” died 14th 
July 1824, aged 35 years. 

In Memory of Mr. George Seeberg, 
who died the 27th Oct. MDCCXCIV. 
aged 32 years. 

In Memory of Maria Crawford, 

died 13th Dec. 1832, aged 60 years. 


To the Memory of Mr. John Sheppard, 
died 9th May 1828, aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain R. N. Haram, 
died the 25th Nov. 1819, aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Robert Bunn, 
Late Midshipman of the II. C. S. “ Mangles,” 
and brother to her Commander, aged 14 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. D. Cabell, 
Assistant Assay Master in the H. C. Mint, 
Calcutta, who died on the 31st January 1817, 
aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. P. Templeton, 
Obit 20tli day of January 1817, aged 23 years. 
This Monument has been erected by her friends to 
perpetuate the Memory of her they in life 
respected and in death revere. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. "Wm. Roscoc, 
died 25th Jan. 1832, aged 45 years, 3 months 
and 9 days, 

Sincerely regretted by his affectionate widow. 
’Tis God that lifts our comforts high, 

Or sinks them in the grave, 

He gives, and blessed be His name, 

He takes but what he gave. 


In Memory of Miss Charlotte Hamilton, 

eldest daughter of Mr. H. Hamilton, Surveyor, 
Madras Establishment, who departed this life on 
the 13th of November 1824, aged 2 years, 

4 months and 19 days. 


“ .Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
God, and he took them up in his arms, put his 
hands upon them, and blessed them.” — St. Mark, 
x. 14, 16. v. 


In Memory of Mrs. M. Conran, 
who died 7th September 1824, aged 18 years 
and 10 months. 


Mrs. Ann Harris, 

died 8th December 1824, aged 22 years. 


In Memory of Margaret, 
wife of J. W. Roberts, H. C. Marine, died 7th 
August 1837, aged 28 years. 

Within this silent tomb, 

A wife, a mother sleeps, 

In whose calm breast, 

Peaceful virtue dwelt. 

Ardour of affection, humble views of self, and 
faith in God. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. D. J. Munyard, 
H. C. Pilot Service, who departed this life | I 
October 26th, 1827, aged 34 years. 

Also Jane, his wife, died 15 days after, aged 35 years 
In death they were not divided. 


Sacred to the Memory of Henry Sevestre, 
who died 8th Nov. 1833, aged 14 yrs. 25 days, j > £ 

P. Delash. 

Obit 10th April 1804, JE t. 25 years. 

The tribute of a friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret ‘Wright, 

Widow of the late Mr. James Wright, who 
departed this life on the 5th August 1833, 
aged 48 years and 3 months. 


Lucy Eleanora Priest, 

Obit 21st January 1832. 

Round Heaven’s high throne myriads of ange 
throng, 

Another angel comes, each wafts the sound, 
Then to the Almighty soar’d in grateful song, 
And “ Hallelujahs” through the vast expans 
rebound. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain ‘W. B. Davidson, 
who died on the 21st October 1827, 
aged 30 years. 




k 






SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Adelaide Jane, 
the infant daughter of J. Revely of Penang, 
January 1837. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. William Sealy, 
who died the 23d April 1820, aged 22 years. 


Beneath lay the remains of 
Captain Charles Dew, 
of the country service, who died on the 22d 
Nov. 1824, aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eliza Jane Wilkinson, 

wife of the late Conductor Wilkinson, who died 
on the 28th Dec. 1827, aged 60 years. 


In Memory of Mrs. Mary Locken, 
wife of Mr. R. Locken, II. C. Marine, born 15th 
March 1802, died 4th March 1829. 

Also sons of the above, Richard James, 
born 23d Dec. 1819, died 4th June 1821. 

Aud Joseph Henry, 
born 20th July 1821, died 10th June 1824. 


To the Memory of G. A. Horne, 
died 12thMarch 1830, aged 4 yrs. 1 month, 8 days. 


Underneath are deposited the remains of 
Mrs. Ann Shepherd, 
who died 28th January 1818, in the fortieth 
year of her age. 

To her Memory this pillar is erected by her very 
affectionate husband, the Rev. Henry Shepherd, 
Senior Chaplain at this Presidency. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Mary Anne Emmer, 

daughter of the late John Bentley, Esq. born 26th 
Feb. 1797, died lltli Dec. 1827. 

This Monument has been erected by 
Mrs. AnneBentley, as a tribute of sincere mater- 
nal affection to the memory of the deceased. 


151 

Also Eliza, wife of John William Inglis, Esq. 
died 7th August 1839, aged 32 years. 


In Memory of 
Henry Atkins Phillips, 

infant son of Mr. Henry Phillips, 
died 11th Sept. 1826, aged 2 years, 7 months 
and 4 days. . 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


T his last tribute of affection is consecrated 
by her husband. 

To the Memory of Elizabeth Harwood, 
who resigned this life on the 4th of March 1815, 
jEtat 27 years. 

No laurels crown her weeping urn, 

Nor wisdom’s pride proclaim her fame, 

Yet virtue’s lamp holds out to burn, 

And sheds sweet fragrance o’er her name. 
Unstrain’d by follies of the great, 

From scenes of envy far remov’d, 

She knew no malice, knew no hate, 

By all esteemed, by all beloved. 

Connubial love inspir’d her heart, 

Of each endearing gift possess’t, 

Her only care was to impart, 

The charms with which her mind was blest. 
Sleep, then, fair virtue’s daughter, here, 
Until the final trump shall sound, 

Thy God for thee shall soon appear, 

And raise thy form with radiance crown’d. 

Sacred to the Memory of Robert Gibson, 
of Denmark Hill, Surry, who departed this life 
6th February 1823. 

Born in the parish of Slains, Aberdeenshire, 
North Britain, A. D. 1759. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Richard Pauling, 
who died 20th October 1822, aged 39 years. 


Emily Corrie, 

daughter of the Reverend D. Corrie, died the 
16th of June 1815, aged 6 months and 18 days. 


To the Memory of Mr. 'William Myers, 
born 12th of July 1758, died the 19th of 
January 1817. 

11 For we know that if our earthly house of this 
tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of 
God, an house not made with hands eternal in the 
heavens.” — 2d Cor. v. ch. 1 ver. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

George Twin, child of 

George and Emilia Barton, died 19th Nov. 1822, 
aged 16 months and 6 days. 


George W’ alter Smith, 

Obit. 25th April 1831, iEt. 8 months 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain David Miller, 
late Commander of the H. C. C. Ship 
“ Coldstream,” died 16th Jan. 1829, aged 42 yrs. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
John Bethune Inglis, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 25th April 1821, 
aged 39 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Pauling-, 
relict of the late Richard Pauling, who departed 
this life on the 22d March 1824, aged 28 years. 


Memoriae Sacrum Gibson, 

Obit September 1st, Anno Domino 1813, 
Aitatis suae 24. 

Also to the Memory of 
George Thomas Gibson, 

who departed this life the 5th of Dec. 1826, 
aged 43 years. 


Mr. John Gee, born 27th of August 1791, 
died 30th of March 1830, aged 38 years 7 months. 


Michael Slader, died 29th March 1830, 
aged 51 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Muster T. V. Soady, 
died 22nd March 1830, aged 10 years 4 months 
and 20 days. 

‘ ‘ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. C. A. Maither, 
who daparted this life on the 17th March 1826, 
aged 26 years and 7 months. 

This tomb is erected by her most affectionate 
friend, Mrs. E. Taylor. 


152 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Mr. Janies Garrod, 

died 16th May 1830, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. N. Carter, 
son of the Rev. W. Carter, Rector of Ashted 
Surry, late of the Hon’ble C.'s Bengal Marine, 
who was unfortunately washed overboard from 
the floating light vessel Torch, in the dreadful 
gale of the Sand Heads on the 27th May 1823. 

He was a pious Christian, a true friend and affec- 
tionate son. All who knew him loved him and 
sincerely lament his loss. Aged 21 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. IVIary Maun, 
died on the 18th November 1827, aged 80 years, 
1 month and 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Charles Fleming Y/alker, 

late chief officer of the Ship “ Bombay Mer- 
chant,” died 22nd July 1819, aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Susan Young, 
daughter of W. Young, Esq. of Batavia, 
who departed this life on the 25th May 1823, 
aged 9 years. 


Also Miss Christiana Young, 

who departed this life on the 5th March 1826, 
aged 14 years. 

Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord, even 
so says the spirit, for from henceforth they rest 
from their labours. 


i Sacred to the Memory of 

Sarah, wife of Mr. R. Sansum, 
died 15th October 1821, aged 30 years. 
A sincere Christian. 

The memory of the just shall be blessed. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Issabella Sarah Joice, 
who departed this life on the 21st Oct. 1836, 
aged 17 years, 


Sacred to the Memory of 
M iss Issabella Crosswell, 
died 11th Jan. 1823, aged 11 years and 8 months. 


In Memory of Mrs. Mary Ann Scott, 
died 23rd May 1831, 
aged 17 years, 6 months and 23 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs, J. Roche, wife of Captain J. Roche, 
died 30th Nov. 1833, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Jane Ann, daughter of N. and J. Paliologus, 
w r ho died 30th November 1833, 
aged 4 years, 3 months and 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Peter Pennitz, 
who departed this life on the 23rd of May 1823, 
aged 62 years. 


In Memory of Mr. Charles Browen, 

died 1st Jan. 1830, aged 36 years. 

Highly esteemed and sincerely regretted. 

Alfred Gillanders, 

Ob. 25th Feb. 1836, JEt. 5 yrs. 3 ms. and 16 dys. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. J. G. Conran, 

son of the late Major Henry Conran, 
who departed this life on the ISth March 1829, 
aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Jalla, wife of Mr. Paul Jalla, 
who departed this life on the 3rd May 1829, 
aged 22 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss J. M. Conran, 

daughter of the late Major Henry Conran, 
who departed this life on the 23rd Sept. 1829, 
aged 36 years. 


HENRY CONRAN, ESQ. — ( Late a Major in his Britannic Majesty's Service.) 

This Gentleman entered at an early age into the service of his country, and was sent with his regi- 
ment during the glorious War of 1755-6 to America, where he had the honor to serve under the im- 
mortal Wolf; and was present in 1759, at the death of that Hero, in the battle fought on the hemhths 
of Abraham, near Quebec ; he served subsequently under Lord Townshed, and assisted in the reduction 
of the Capital, and province of Canada at the close of the war he returned to Europe, and after some 
time retired from the army on half pay. — Major Conran came to India by way of Aleppo, and the greal 
desert, about the year 1780, in charge of a packet from the Court of Directors to the Bengal Government 
which service he performed with expedition and success. Mr. Hastings, the then Governor General 
appointed him an Aid-de-Camp, and Private Secretary, in which situation he remained, till tin 
return of Mr. Hastings to Europe, in 1785, since that time Major Conran generally lived in' Calcutta 
much esteemed by his friends and acquaintance. He had a paralytic stroke about two years before hi; 
death which deprived him almost entirely of the use of speech, and his right arm was also so mucl 
affected, that he was unable to write ; nevertheless he continued cheerful and in good spirits, enjoyitq 
with unimpaired delight, till within two days of his death, the rational amusements of reading "am 
speculating on the events of the day. lie died at Calcutta, on Friday evening, the 15th of May 1810 
at the advanced age of 72 years. 

(The following Inscription is taken from his Monument in the North Ground :) 

Sacred to the Memory of Major Henry Conran, 
who departed this life on the 15th of May 1810, aged 72 years. 

This stone is placed to his Memory by a beloved and sincere friend. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


153 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Scott, 

• who departed this life on the 12th January 1821, 
aged 46 years. 

To the Memory of James Rattray. 

He was born on the 5th May 1776, and closed an 
honorable and useful life as second Judge of the 
'Provincial Court of Dacca on the 13th Feb. 1818. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Keymer, 
of the H. C. Marine, 

who departed this life 24th June 1819 aged 34 yrs. 
This Monument is erected as a lasting 
testimony of his virtues by his affectionate 
brother, James Keymer. 

Adieu, my friend, a long and sad farewell ; 

No thought can utter, nor no tongue can tell, 

The pangs I feel at the dear word farewell. 



wife of Mr. James Keymer, Junior, 
of the Hon’ble Company’s Bengal Marine, 
who departed this life on the 1st October 1822, 
aged 23 years, 1 month and 11 days, 
after a few days illness which she bore with 
Christian patience and fortitude. Her amiable 
and virtuous disposition and good temper, 
rendered her dear to her relations and friends, 
and an irreparable loss to her afflicted and 
disconsolate husband and parents. 

This Monument is ereeted by her mother as a 
record of her devoted attachment, and as a token 
of affectionate remembrance of her 
exemplary worth. 

‘ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away.” 


In Memory ofWilliam Henry, 
nfant son of Mr. G. H. Keymer, H. C. Marine, 
died 16th July 1828, aged 1 year, 9 months 
and 14 days. — Job. 1st chap. 21 v. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah J3e Xianougerede, 
rife of Mr. L. DeLanougerede, who departed this 
life Tuesday 26th Sept. 1826, aged 27 years, 

11 months and 10 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of the still-born infant of 
Gysbert Van Voorst, and of Louisa Elizabeth 
his wife, 21st May 1830. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me for of 
.uch is the kingdom of heaven. And he took 
them up in his arms, put his hand upon them and 
olessed them.” — Matt. x. 14 — 15. 


Sacred to the Memory of Xiavinia Adeline, 
eldest daughter of Mr. J. R. and Mrs. M. J. 
>amp, born 11th Oct. 1817, died 28th Dec. 1821. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of God.” 

And her sister, Matilda Nancy, 
born 19th Nov. 1819, died 27th April 1827, 
both sincerely and deeply regretted by all. 


Also of their mother, 

-Matilda Jane Camp, who died 9th April 1842 
aged 45 years, 2 months and 2 days. 


The infant son of Stephen Parker, born 5th 
October 1834, died 26th May 1835. 


In Memory of Mrs. E. Barwell, 
who died on the 9th .Tune 1826, aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Georgiana, 
the daughter of George Powney Thompson, Esq. 
of the Civil Service, and Harriet his wife, who 
departed this life 26th May 1838, aged 10 months. 


To the Memory of Mr. Charles Bowbear, 
Obit. 5th May 1824, aged 28 yrs. and 9 mos. 
” Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, 
for the end of that man is peace.” 

In Memory of Mr. C. D. Bakker, 
who died 7th May 1827, aged 19 years. 

This tomb is erected by his mother. 


James Grant Yates, 

born 28th Nov. 1823, died 19th May 1821. 

Here lies the body of James Moore Hunter, 
who died 10th June 1816, aged 21 years, 
to whose memory this tribute of respect and 
attachment is erected by his friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Samuel Massingham, 
born at Holt, in Norfolk, departed this life 29th 
April 1824, aged 37 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James Perrier, Junior, 
son of James Ferrier, Esq. of Juanpore, who 
departed this life the 28th April 1827, aged six 
years, four months and ten days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master John D’Oyly, 

who departed this life on the 29th April 1824, 
aged 4 years and 6 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Mills, 
who died Jan. 25th 1826, aged 29 yrs. and 7 mos. 

With gentle manners and with modest worth, 
Meekly he spent his destin’d course on earth, 
Beloved, and most by those who knew him best, 
Deep were his kindness on their hearts im- 
press’d ; 

The dutious son, fond father and kind friend, 
Are each deplor’d in his untimely end. 


Sacred to the Memory of Master Peter Mills, 
who died February 9th 1822, aged 6 years, 

9 months 9 days. 

Thou dearest child, my once delight, 
Where art thou gone ? now left my sight. ; 
I hope in heaven an angel bright, 

To live with Christ by day and night. 

Yet still thy absence I deplore, 

Until my soul to heaven shall soar. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Peter Mills, 
who died the 16th February 1818, in the 56th 
year of his age. 

The unaffected simplicity of his heart, joined to a 
life of virtue and piety, must ever make his wife, 
his children and his friends lament his loss, 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Abraham James, 
Printer, son of Major Abraham James, Obit 11th ' 
November 1828, at the age of 32. 

By nature form’d for every social part, 

Mild were his manners and sincere his heart. 
This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
wife, Louisa James. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


m 

Sacred to the Memory of James Stewart, Esq. j 
who departed this life on the 17th June 1828. 

Beneath this humble stone now rests enshrin’d, 
Alas ! what once enclosed the purest mind, 

Yet whilst he leaves us for his kindred skies, 

See from the expiring flame a Phoenix rise, 

By the same hand severally kind was given, 

To us a man, and a saint to Heaven. 

Adieu, bless’d shade, alas too early fled, 

Who knew thee living but laments thee dead ; 

A soul so calm, so free from every stain, 

So tried by torture and unmov’d by pain ; 

Without a groan with agonies he strove, 

Heav’n wondering snatch’d him to the joys above 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Abraham James, 
who departed this life on the 4th August, 1834, 
aged 17 years, 11 months and 29 days. 

Here lies the tenderest son, brother, friend ; 

His life with goodness mark’d, with grief his 
end ; 

His mind was calm, O may his soul have rest ; 
He gave to ev’ry Christian virtue scope, 

And what his practice was is now bis hope. 


This Monument was erected by Mr. and Mrs. 
Moris, 

To the Memory of Master Jno. Thos. Smith, 
who departed this life on the 12th April 1814, 
aged 2 years and 7 days. 


Here lies the remains of Benjamin Turner, 
For many years an Attorney of the Supreme 
Court of Judicature of this Presidency, and one of 
the oldest British inhabitants of this place. A man 
who to high professional character and 
attainments, united a primitive simplicity of 
manners, and an unbounded benevolence of heart, 
discharged the duties of civil and social life 
with exemplary propriety and fidelity, and in the 
several relations of husband, father, friend, and 
fellow-citizen was uniformly actuated by princi- 
ples of the purest rectitude, by the warmest 
and most generous emotions of the soul. Respect- 
ed by the community in which he dwelt, beloved 
by his friends, reverenced by a numerous family, 
he closed an honorable and useful career on 
the 7th day of July 1819, in the 6Gth year 
of his age, 

after enduring with unshaken fortitude, and with 
the meekness and resignation which becomes a 
Christian, the torments of a protracted and 
excruciating disease. 

Here also is deposited the body of 
Benjamin Turner, Junior, 
his second son and successor in busiiiess, the 
early partner of his tomb. A man of the most 
upright and honourable principles, cut off by the 
ravages of a cruel disease on the 12th day of 
April 1821, in the 25th year of his age, 
affording a memorable warning, that ‘ ‘ in the 
midst of life we are in death.” 

In testimony of his worth and of her affection, 
this stone is inscribed by his afflicted widow', M. T. 


To the Memory of William Hollings, Esq. 

Obit 10th October 1815, aged 45. 

This last melancholy and affectionate tribute is 
paid by his wife Sophia. He w r as distinguished 
during life for his virtues, and an enlightened and 
benevolent mind. 


Sacred to the Memory of Airs. S. .(lolling*, 
who expired on the 10th August 1831, 
aged 50 years. 

Deep and sincere was the grief which her loss 
occasioned ; she was a faithful wife, an affec- 
tionate mother and a truly benevolent woman. 

Long will the memory of her virtues be cherished 
by her afflicted family, by whom this Monu- 
ment has been erected as a tribute of affection, 
and as a proof that they were not unmindful 
of all she had endured for their sake. 

Mr. John Grieff, 'Ml 

died 11th May 1808, aged 39 years. £ 

_ • - V %. 

Mrs. Catherine Grieff, J 

died 10th May 1816, aged 32 years. 

This Monument is erected by their affectionate 

son, W. G. Gr ieff.. . / 0. * I 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. J. H- Grant, 
w'ho died on the 7th Feb. 1837, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Arthur Owen Leicester, 

bora Nov. 30th 1810, died May 23d, 1827. 


In Alemory of O. A. Thomas, 

died 15th May, 1833, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Alemory of 
Charlotte Frances Breen, 
w'ho departed this life on the 6th April 1333, 
aged 2 months and 27 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Anne Catherine, >1 
wfife of Mr. John Goldsmith, who died on the H 
7th April 1824, aged 21 years, 8 months 
and 25 days. 

May her soul rest in peace. 

This humble testimony of their esteem has been d 
erected by a few friends, 

To the Memory of Edward Murphy, Esq. 

Died 8th March 1832, aged 20 yrs. and 9 mos. U 


Mr. Samuel Stone, 

Died 4th June 1846, aged 24 years. 


In Memory or Martha Elizabeth, 

daughter of John and Elizabeth Gash, died llth 
June 1836, aged 9 months and 22 days. 

Also to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Gash, 
wife of Mr. John Gash, who departed this life on 
the 6th June 1838, aged 34 years. 


Miss E. M. Gash, died 5th June 1846, 
aged 8 years. 

To the Memory of Mr. Charles Buckland, 
died 4th March 1836, aged 52 years, one month 
and 4 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Airs. E. M. Gee, 
bora llth April 1808, died 30th Nov. 1835. 


Charles, son of Wm. Alathew’s, Esq. 
of Juanpore, bora 6th December 1817, and dice 
24th April 1827. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Airs. Margaret Sophia Reid, 
relict of the late Capt. Hugh Atkins Reid, 
who departed this life at Calcutta on the 28th 
June 1833. aged 59 years. 


lb 

£ 


lie 


at 

ua 


(Va 

a 


1 i 

it 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


155 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Young, 
who departed this life 22d April 1823, 
aged 40 years. 

Here lies the body of Mrs. Ann Ridge, 
who departed this life on the 31st Dec. 1828, 
aged 68 years. 

This Monument is erected by her son as a tes- 
timony of his affection to a good mother. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Ireland, 
born 25th Dec. 1819, died 29th Aug. 1833, 
deeply and sincerely regretted. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliiiab&th, 
wife of Mr. James Montgomery, ship builder 
at Sulkeah, who departed this life on the 18th 
Sept. 1820, aged 25 years. 

And also two of her children, who died young. 


Here lies the infant son of Daniel and Amelia 
Cordozo, Obit. 13th July 1827. 

O fairest flower, no sooner blown but blasted. 


Sacred to the Memory of blaster S'. R. H. Smith, 
born 18th January 1823, and departed this 
life 12th May 1826. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Paul Kellner, Esq. 

formerly a Lieutenant in the Wirtemberg Regt.. 
who departed this life on the 29th Dec. 1822, 
aged 55 years and 6 months. 


In Memory of Master George May, 
son of Capt. John Frederick May, 
died 31st March 1834, aged 7 years and 10 mos. 


Roger Shine, Obit. 30th May 1831. 


In Memory of Catherine, 
born 11th and died 16th Nov. 1823. 

And Robert, born 1st and died 10th Nov. 1824, 
children of John and Catherine Payne, Jr. 


Also of Mr. John Payne, Sr. 
died 16th May 1826, aged 53 years. 

And of his son John Payne, Jr. 
who died 20th Dec. 1833, aged 34 years, 11 mos. 
and 26 days. 

Inscribed by his afflicted mother. 

Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Forbes, 
son of Major General John Forbes, 
swho departed this life at Sooksaugur on the 16th 
day of November, A, D. 1823, aged 45 years, 

4 months and 20 days, leaving his afflicted 
rvife, Fanny Forbes and children to deplore his loss, 
who erected this Monument as a tribute of es- 
teem and regard to a most pious, affectionate 
and fond beloved husband. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
lessed be the name of the Lord.” 


To the Memory of Mr. C N. Phillips, 
late surgeon of the Ship “ Victory,” who was 
drowned on the 12th of May 1836. 

In Memory of Mrs. Jessy Randolph, 
the dearly beloved wife of Henry Randoph, of 
hittagong. She died January 19th, 1837, aged 29 
years, 9 months and 27 days, 
leaving three infant children and a disconsolate 
husband to deplore their loss. 

‘ Though He slay me, yet will I trust in Him.” — 
Job xiii. — 15. 


Mr. N. Davies, died 29th July 1836, 
aged 36 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. B. H. Daunt, 
who died 15th May 1834, aged 28 years. 
Erected by his affectionate widow. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary, 
wife of Mr. John Collins, who departed this life 
the 12th March 1822, aged 36 years, 

x 2 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Smith, 
of Terri. Dept, son of Samuel Smith. 

Long time with grief surely 

And disappoint’! was I sore oppress’d, 

At last kind death has eas’d me, 

And I comfortably lay here at rest. 

Died 19th Dec. 1820, aged 19yrs. 11 ms. 1/ ds. 


Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Salter, 
Shipwright, who died 2d September 1824, 
aged 29 years, 8 months and 8 days. 


Here lies the infant son of H. T. Travers, Esq. 
Obit. 21st February 1805. 


Miss Maria Anne Douglas, 

eldest daughter of J. R. and M. E. Douglas, 
died 10th June 1833, aged 16 years, 

10 months and 8 days. 

Here lies beneath the earthly sod, 

A flower which pleas’d both man and God ; 
With dying lips she thus did call, 

Jesus my life, my love, my all. 

Mrs. Maria Elizabeth Douglas, 

wife of Mr. J. R. Douglas, died 26th Dec. 1819, 
aged 20 years, 4 months and 9 days. 

To the Memory of Mr. James Reynolds, 
Obit. 16th Sept. 1817, iEtat 17 years. 

Here lies beneath this monumental stone 
A youth to fortune and to fame unknown, 
Afflictions sore long time I bore, 

Which wore my strength away, 

And made me long for endless rest 
That never will decay. 


Mary Anne Francis, daughter of 
the Honorable Andrew and Rachel Ramsay, 
is enterred here. Born 7th June 1820, ’ 
died 18th January 1822. 


In Memory of Master R C* Dixon, 
infant son of Mr. J. Dixon, H. C. Marine, 
born 29th July and died 31st July 1822. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant John Anderson, R. N. 
Commander of the Ship, “ Katharine Stewart 
Forbes,” died 8th September 1834, 
aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Mary Susan Gomes, 
who departed this life on the 12th Dec. 1825 
aged 3 years, 7 months and 13 days. 
And her sister, Sarah Ann, died 12th 
Oct. 1828, aged 2 years. 


156 


SOUTH PARK STREET BUR 1AL GROUND, 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Gomes, the wife of Mr. 
Domingo Gomes, who departed this life 28th 
Sept. 1817, aged 37 years, 
leaving a beloved husband and eight children 
to lament their loss. 

“ Be not slothful but followers of them who 
through faith and patience inherit the promise." — 
Heb. vi. 12. 

Life how short, eternity how long. 

In the cold earth Elizabeth, rest, secure, 

Nor fear those ills which once thou didst endure ; 
No pain, nor sickness here can reach thy bones, 
Then sleep in hope within these sculptur’d stones. 
Once shalt thou rise to see thy Saviour’s face, 

And share the bounties of his promised grace, 
How lov’d, how valu’d once avails thee not ; 

To whom related, or by whom begot, 

A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 

’Tis all thou art and all the proud shall be. 

She died a few hours after the birth of her 
fourteenth child, September 28th, 1817, 
in the 37th year of her age. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Robinson, 
son of Thomas Robinson, Commander of the 
Ship “ Intrepid" of Hull, died 6th Nov. 1833, 
aged 14 years, 6 months and 8 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Mathew Smith, of Howrah, 
who departed this life 11th Nov. 1822, aged 54. 


In Memory of James Moffat, 

Surgeon of the “ Phoenix," East Indiaman, 
who departed this life October 31, A. D. 1788, 
aged 55 years. 


Also of Mr. John Moffat, brother to the above, 
who died A. D. 1791, aged 56 years. 

This humble tomb is erected by William Moffat, 
son of the abovenamed James Moffat, who com- 
mandedthe “Phoenix" at this port in the year 1800. 


Sacred to the Memory of Richard Brooks, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 10th Nov. 1822, 
aged 28 years and 4 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Helen Marian Ingle, infant daughter of 
Lieut. H. Ingle, 2nd Bn. 15th R. N. I. 
Obit. 3 August 1823, zEtat 6 months 17 day. 


Sacred to the Memory of Marianne, 
daughter of the late Lieut. -Colonel Muller, 
who died on the lltk August 1833, 
in the 38th year of her age. 


Mrs. Louisa Peat, 

wife of W. Peat, Master Pilot, who departed 
this life 8th January 1833, 
aged 23 years, 5 months and 20 days. 

To the Memory of'Captain William Peat, 

(A friend of the poor,) who departed this life be- 
tween Diamond Harbour and Kedgeree, on board ' 
the Steamer “ Forbes," on the 17th of June, 

A. D. 1837, and enterred at the latter place, 
aged 41 years, 

leaving four disconsolate children to bemoan their j 
irreparable loss. 

“ He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto 
the Lord, and that which he hath given will he pay j 
him again." — Prov. xix. 17. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Joseph Matthews, 

who died 8th Nov. 1822, aged 50 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Matthews, 

who died 23d March 1833, aged 75 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Harriet McKenny, 

who departed this life 4th August 1824, 
aged 13 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Anne Martha Wall, 

who died 4th of August 1833, aged 7 years 
and 7 days. 

Also, Harriet Jane "Wall, 

died 23d July 1834, aged 2 years, and 8 months. 
And George William Wall, 
Volunteer H. C. B. Marine, who was drowned 
19th October 1837, while learning to swim, 
aged 14 years, 8 months and 17 days. 

His unassuming manners and mild disposition 
endeared him to all who knew him, particularly 
his disconsolate parents, who are left to 
bewail his loss. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord." 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Robert Swinly, 
late Branch Pilot H. C. Bengal Marine, 
who departed this life on the 11th January 1824, 
aged 90 years. 


Also Mrs, Ann Swinly, his wife, 
who departed this life on the 21st July 1832, 
aged 90 years. 

Erected by T. Scallan. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Louisa Scallan, 
who departed this life 6th February 1810, 
aged 24 years. 

Likewise her five children. 

“ Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall 
see God.” — Mat. c. 5. v. 8. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

George Crump, Esq. 

who died on the 9th of Dec. 1824, aged 54 years, 
3 months and 9 days. 

Here lies the tenderest husband, father, friend ; 
His life with goodness marked, with grief his end ; 
His mind was calm, Oh ! may his soul have rest, 
And he who others bless’d, himself he bless’d. 

He gave to every Christian virtue scope, 

And what his practice was is now his hope. 

As a grateful tribute to his memory, this Monu- 
ment is erected by his affectionate widow 
and children. 


Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. S. Crump, 
who departed this life on the 25th July 1832, 
aged 15 years and 2 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Hunter, 
who departed this life 23d January 1830, 
aged 40 years. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


157 


Also in Memory of Harriett, 
his wife, who died 3d Feb. 1834, aged 29 years 
and 3 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Higgs, 
who departed this life 24th March 1832, 
aged 42 years. 

Also in Memory of Harriett, 
his wife, who died 24th Oct. 1828, aged 24 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mary Thomas Jessop, 
the beloved wife of George Jessop, Esq. 
who departed this life 8tlx June 1834, aged 29 yrs. 
2 months and 22 days. 

Also of George Edward Jessop, 

second son of George and Mary Jessop, 
who departed this life 28th April 1827, aged 
4 months and 4 days. 


To the Memory of Thomas Bruce, 
infant son of T. B. Swinhoe, Esq. 
bom on the 22d August, died on the 
21st September 1828. 


Augusta Eliza, 

infant daughter of Thomas Bruce Swinhoe, 
Attorney at Law, born 11th Aug. 1819, 
died 10th March 1820. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Robert, son of Robert Swinhoe, Esq. born on the 
16th May 1830, died on the 3rd June 1831. 


Caroline Sarah, 

Daughter of Robert Swinhoe, Esq. born 18th day 
of November 1831, died 2d day of Oct. 1832. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Roxburgh, 
who died 17th September 1823, aged 46 years. 

This Monument, as a tribute of affection, is 
erected by his disconsolate widow, Catherine 
Roxburgh. 


To the Memory of T. P. Gennoe, 
who died 9th September 1832, aged 39 years : 
and his daughter, Sarah li. Gennoe, born 16th 
September 1830, died 19th September 1834, 
aged 4 years and 3 day. 


In Memory of 

Miss Ellen Catherine Gennoe, 

who died 1st October 1835, aged 6 years, 
8 months 15 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. E. M. R. Richmond, 

who departed this life on the 8 th February 1837, 
aged 18 years, 1 month and 13 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Anna Margaret Helen Cook, 

Daughter of the late J. R. Cook, Esq. Indigo 
Planter, who departed this life on the 29th April 
1837, aged 14 years, 2 months and 16 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


To the Memory of Mr. James Maund 
died 28th July 1825, aged 16 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Henry Guinand, Esq. 
of Pultah, who died 18th of April 1790, 
aged 30 years. 


Also of his son, 

Lieut. Robert Samuel Guinand, 

of the H. C. Artillery, who died 15th ot October 
1810, aged 22 years. 

Death with bis dart did pierce my heart, 

Whilst I was in my prime, 

My friends most dear your grief forbear, 

’Twas God’s appointed time. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza Alfred, 
died 14th Aug. 1827, aged 12 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. David Churcher, 
who departed this life the 28th of August 1824, 
aged 27 years. 

Sincere in friendship and in dealings just, 

In every action equal to the trust ; 

Such was the man whom God to us had given, 
So soon to merit and to enter heaven. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. H. F. Churcher, 
who departed this life on the 31st October 1833, 
aged 28 years, 9 months and 2 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Here lies also the remains of the infant son and 
daughter of Henry Francis and Eleanor 
Churcher ; the former departed this life on the 
18th December 1825, and the latter on the 
1st June 1830. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 

Death came w r ith friendly care, 

The opening buds to heaven convey’d, 

And bade them blossom there. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr, S. Fallon, 
Mate in the H. C. Pilot Service, who died 22d 
September 1823, aged 28 years. 

He has left a disconsolate widow and 2 children. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Abraham Bailey, Esq. 
late of Jessore, Indigo Planter, who departed this 
life on the 5th September 1822, aged 46 years. 
Also to the Memory o! Elizabeth, his wife, 
who survived him only 3 months and 
19 days, aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Maria Wattell 
who died 11th January 1822, aged 32 years. ’ 
I rest in hope. 


’ George William, son of Digby William and 
Elizabeth Shuttleworth, aged 8 months. 


To the Memory of John Parsons, Esq. 
who departed this life the 3rd day of Aug. 1824 
aged 39 years. 


In Memory of the infant son of Major Fast, bom 
12th and died 13th July 1823. 


Sacred to the Memory of Samuel Greeuwav 
born 29th October 1802, died 27th July 1 HI 1 
the eldest son of Samuel and Rose Anne Green 
way. He was a child of great promise. 


158 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Mrs. Amelia Horn, 

the widow of Captain John Horn, died 5th Dec. 
1818, aged 41 years. 


Here are enterred the mortal remains of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, 
who died the 26th September 1819, aged 51 yrs. 
This Monument was erected by her eldest son, 
W. R. Jones. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. A. K. Pennington, 
who departed this life on the 6th December 1824, 
aged 33 years ; and on the 8th, 
Rebecca KL. Pennington, 
aged 5 years and 2 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master R. R. G. Pennington, 

who departed this life on the 10th of Feb. 1823, 
aged 6 years, 3 months and 5 days. 


Mary Elizabeth, 

daughter of Thomas and Sarah Waterman, born 
20th May 1822, died 2d August 1823. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Penrose, 
son of C. B. Francis, Esq. Surgeon, died 16th 
January 1834, aged 13 months and 11 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Master J. W. Johnson, 
who departed this life 24th of September 1822, 
aged 17 years, 1 month and 24 days. 

This stone is put up by his affectionate mother, 
and relations. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Swinden, 
late superintendent of the Government Park at 
Barrackpore, who departed this life 23rd Feb. 
1819, aged 31 years, 

deservedly and sincerely regretted by all who had 
the pleasure of his acquaintance. 

The husband, father, friend sincere, 

In death’s cold embrace lies buried here, 
Untimely nipt in the bloom of life, 

Leaving two children and loving wife, 

Who in deep distress sheds affliction’s tear, 
For then - husband, father, friend, sincere. 

As a tribute of regard to the Memory of her late 
husband, this stone is placed by his disconsolate 
widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph Weldon, 
late Branch Pilot in the Hon’ble Company’s 
Marine, who departed this life the 25th January 
1815, aged 50 years, 
laving beloved, in all relations true, 
Exposed to follies but inclined to few ; 
Reader — reflect and copy if you can, 

The social virtues of this worthy man. 


Sacred to the Memory of the late 
Captain Robert Seek, 
died 22d July 1821, aged 64 years and 2 days. 
Boreas’ blast and Neptunes’ waves have tossed 
me to and fro, 

But to an anchor I am come and safely here below, 
And at an anchor 1 do ride with many in the fleet, 
And once again we shall set sail our Lord and 
Christ to meet. 

Also to the Memory of Mr. Robert Reck, 
son of the late Captain Robert Beek, died 27th 
October 1822, aged 16 yrs, 5 mos. and 23 days. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth Mary, 
daughter of Mr. II. T. Metcalfe, Obit 7th Sept. 
1813, /Et. 4 years, 1 month and 18 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


A. A. and Mam’s 

infant daughter, buried 11th December 1837. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
M aster Richard Smith, 

who departed this life on the 24th July 1821, 
aged 9 years, 8 months and 14 days. 


Master Chas. Potenger, 

died 23rd August 1821, aged 9 years. 

This stone thy parents’ love would shew, 
This verse their grief would bring to view, 
Thy parents’ love, their deep distress, 

Nor stone can shew nor words express. 

Sacred to the Memory of Doctor John Chear. 


Sacred to the Memory of Emma Rose, 
daughter of A. H. and Eliza Smith, who departed 
this life on the 3d of April 1815, 
aged 2 years, 5 months and 11 days. 


Here lies the remains of Henry Moore, 
who departed tins life 12th of June 1823, 
the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Moore. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
"William Reckford Gordon, 

A Senior Merchant in the Sendee of the Hon’ble 
East India Company, who departed this life on 
the 7th day of November in the year of our Lord 
Christ one thousand and eight hundred and 
seventeen, in the thirtieth year of his age. 

To the Memory of Mr Joseph I ves. 
Deputy Register in the General Department., 
who departed this life 30th of July 1827, 
aged 52 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Peter Davidson, Esq. 

late of Bhaugulpore, (originally of Findhorn, 
Morayshire,) who died in Calcutta on the 29th 
July 1821, aged 32 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Alexander Bruce, 
who died the 29tli Sept. 1816, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sophia Caroline, 
the beloved and only child of Henry James and 
Marie Emelie Frederick, died 23d Sept. 
1835, aged 1 year, 6 months and 17 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Caroline 
the fourth beloved child of Henry James and 
Marie Emelie Frederick, died 6th Feb. 1841, 
aged 4 months and 15 days. 


This tomb was erected by Lieut. Wm. Forster, 
in memory of his brother Ensn. James Forster, 
who died the 30th of Augt. 1779, aged 26 years. 
Also his son Frederic Stuckley Forster, 
who was born the 22d of July 1776, 
and died the 16th of July 1780. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. H. E Reid, 
the wife of Mr. Js. Reid, H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 28th July 1833, 
aged 17 years, 3 months and 14 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


159 


Sacred to the Memory of W. H. Briabane, 
who departed this life on the 28t;h Oct. 1818. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. A. C. Forshaw, 
(late Master in the H. C. Bengal Marine,) 
died 13th May 1833, aged 33 years. 

7 months 22 days. 

“ Know this also that the Lord hatli chosen to 
himself the man that is godly.” 

Sacred to the Memory of Isabella, 
wife of T. W. Sumners, who departed this life 
the 26th of August 1818, aged 18 years, 

1 month and 21 days. 

Also of her infant child, aged 8 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Edward, 
who departed this life on the 31st May 1824, 
aged 8 months. 

And 'William Edmeades, 
who followed his brother on the 1st July 1824, 
aged 6 years. 

Sons of David and Anne Shearman. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Beneath this Monument are deposited the 
mortal remains of 
Sir John Hadley D’Oyly, 
of Shottisham in the county of Norfolk, 

6th Baronet, who departed this world on the 
5th day of Jan. 1818, aged 64, 
deeply deplored by his surviving family. He was 
truly exemplary in all the relations of life, 
and above all distinguished as a pious 
and sincere Christian. 


In Memory of Elizabeth, 

daughter of Mr. J. Dyer, H. C. Marine, 
born 5th March and died 22d July 1828. 


Sacred lo the Memory of George Hill, 
son of David Hill, Esq. of the Madras Civil 
Service, died the 25th of Nov. 1819, 
aged fourteen months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Julia Cook, 
who departed this life on the 6th March 1825, 
aged 7 months and 8 days. 


To the Memory of Miss E. R. Andrews, 
who departed this life 5th Oct. 1833, aged 14 yrs. 
and 25 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. Andrews, 
wife of the late Mr. T. Andrews, Post Master at 
Diamond Harbour, who departed this life on 
the 18tli July 1820, aged 45 years. 


Also to the Memory of 
the late Mrs. E. Youngs, 
wife of Mr. N. Youngs, and daughter of 
T. and E. Andrews, 

who departed this life on the 10th April 1821, 
aged 27 years. 


Also to the Memory of 
the late Mr. T. Andrews, 

Deputy Harbour Master at Calcutta, and son of 
T. and E. Andrews, who departed this life 
on the 10th Sept. 1821, aged 29 years 
and 11 months. 


Here lies interred the still-born daughter of 
R. Alexander, Esq. 11th July 1822. 


In the north grave of this Monument repose 
the remains of Mrs. Sophia Crahley, 
born 24th Feb. 1808, died 17th March 1833, 
aged 25 years 22 days. 

Possessed of every virtue that adorned the 
wife and the Christian, she wms excelled 
but by few in the practice of either of those virtues. 

Her early loss will ever be deeply lamented 
as her memory will be deservedly cherished, by 
her afflicted husband, who pays this small 
hut grateful tribute to her departed w orth. 

“ Watch therefore for ye know not what hour 
your Lord doth come.” 


1 

1 


In Memory of Henry, 

The infant son of Mr. Henry Tyler, of Calcutta. 

Nat. 8th Jan. 1819, Obit. 18th Aug. 1819. 
Relentless death hath nipt this early bloom, 

That cheered paternal hopes, maternal love, 

Yet anguished feelings look beyond the tomb 
And faith beholds him soar to realms above. 

Thus parents weep and sorrowing, drop the tear, 
For Henry’s lov’d remains lie buried here ; 

So young, so good, so truly gentle, mild, 

That nature own’d him for her fairest child. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Hollings, 
who departed this life on the 6th Jan. 1807. 
She lived respected and died lamented. 


Here lie interred the remains of 

Mr. David Ogilvy, 

of the Madras Medical Establishment, and son of 
the Rev. Dr. Skene Ogilvy of Aberdeen. 

He was a young man of a kind, affectionate dis - 
position, and of the most correct and honorable 
principles. He departed this life on the 31st 
day of Oct. 1814, at the early age of 
twenty-one. 

Sacred to the affectionate Memory of Sophia, 
wife of T. M. Howe, died 9th October 1818, 
aged 23 years, 3 months 9 days. 

Oft fond remembrance with the silent tear 
Will to the mind renew past scenes of life, 

And wringing anguish echo to the ear, 

The tender mother, fond and virtuous wife. 


To the Memory of Hugh H. Parks, Esq. 
who died the 14th of Nov. 1811, aged 43 years. 


Here resteth the remains of J. W. Lish, 
who died the 15th November 1830, 
aged 17 years 11 months. 

This stone is erected in token of sisterly affection, 
by Mrs. H. Holmes. 


To the Memory of 
Captain Frederick Mouat, 
of the country service, Obit. 2d Nov. 1826. 


In Memory of Miss E. 1V2. Stacey, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Stacey, died 24th April 1827, 
aged 5 years, 2 months 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R. W. ’’tVaddy 
Register and Accountant, Marine Board Office/ 
Obit. 12th Jan. 1833, aged 32 years, 

10 months and 24 days. 

This tablet is placed by his afflicted widow, Phoe.be. 


160 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Mary Jane Allen, 2nd daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Smyth, born the 29th Nov. 1800, 
died the 6th April 1819, aged 18 years, 

4 months and 7 days. 

A child reposes underneath this sod, 

A child to memory dear — and dear to God ; 
Rejoice ! yet shed the sympathetic tear, 

Mary Sophia lies buried here. 

Daughter of Henry and Maria Humphreys, 
died 21st. April 1829, aged 2 years, 7 months 
and 24 days, 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Humphreys, beloved wife of 
Mr. Henry Humphreys, of the H. C. Marine, 
who departed this life on the 4th December 1837, 
aged 31 years, 11 months and 14 days. 


John F. Crossley, aged 18 days. 


Here lie the remains of 

a dear infant, the daughter of R. DeCourcy, Esq. 
who died on the 30th May 1822. 


To the Memory of Robert, 
son of Captain Anstruther, 6th Lt. Cavy. 
who departed this life on the 24th Dec. 1824, 
aged eight months. 


To the Memory of Oliver, 
son of Henry and Elizabeth Young, who died 
May 10th, 1818, aged 6 months and 2 days. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of John Coverdale, 
Post Master at Kedgeree, Obit. 29th July 1815, 
aged 36 years. 

Ennobled by the virtues of his mind, 

Constant to goodness and in death resigned , 

Who placed true practice in a wise retreat, 
Privately pious and unknown tho’ great ; 

Sure in silent sabbath of the grave 
To taste that tranquil peace he always gave. 

O ! early lost in virtues fairest prime, 

Thy pieties supplied life’s want of time, 

No death is sudden to a soul prepared, 

When God’s own hour brings always God’s re- 
ward. 

Thy death, (and such, O Reader, wish thy own) 
Was free from terrors, and without a groan ; 

Thy spirit to himself th’ Almighty drew, 

Mild as His sun exhales the ascending dew. 

This Monument is erected to his dear Memory 
by his unhappy widow. 


To the Memory of 'William Jefferies, 

Obit. 28th Sept. 1823, ^Etat 3 months 27 days. 
Also Turton Joseph, 

Obit. 2nd October 1823, zEtat 4 months. 
The twin sons of John Jefferies and Henrietta 
Hooper. 


Sacred to the Memory of Sarah, 
wife of T. G. Gunter, of the Town Hall. 
Obit. 20th January 1822, /Etat 36 years. 

As a wife, mother, daughter and sister, she was 
exemplary, and her loss will long be felt by 
her sorrowing family. Her virtues could not be 
surpassed, as such her memory will ever last. In 
remembrance of those virtues this Monument is 
erected by her husband. Also of their infant, 
aged 2 months. 


This stone is placed over the remain of 
John English, who died on the 13th July 1818, 
in the 36th year of his age, universally regretted 

Saccred to the Memory of Sarah Rosalie, wife of 
James Robinson, Esq. She died July 1 9th 1818, 
aged 34 years, and in the same grave are buried 
the remains of James Robinson, Esq. 
Assistant Surgeon on this Establishment, 
and Superintendent of the Insane Hospital. 

He died June 22nd 1819, aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Harriet Besborough Stafford, 

daughter of Lieut. -General Hugh Stafford, 
who departed this life on the 29th April 1817, 
aged 1 year, 6 months and 28 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Capt. Henry Oake, 
of the 29th Regt. of B. N. I. died 20th Aug. 1818, 
aged 43 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Charlotte Reynolds, 

who departed this life 10th September 1817, 
aged 10 months and 14 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain John Ramsay, 

late Barrack-Master of Fort William, who 
departed this life the 20th August 1818, 
aged 38 years. 

Peace — everlasting peace to him. 

Here lies the body of Edward TVhitehead, 

of Philadelphia, who died on the 13th June 1818, 
aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Julia Ann Catherine, 
wife of Captain George Swiney, of the Regiment 
of Bengal Artillery, who departed this life the 
22d of April 1818, aged 23, 
sincerely and deeply lamented by his family and 
friends. Likewise the body of her infant son, 
George Kemsworth, aged 9 months and 
15 days, who died 16th May 1818. 


To the Memory of 

Alexander Gordon Caulfield Esq. 
whose premature death occasioned as deep and 
universal sorrow, as his personal worth, great 
talents and happy manners had inspired respect 
and conciliated affection. He was drowned in 
crossing the river opposite this city in company 
with his intimate friend, T. Abraham, Esq. on the 
evening of the 28th March 1818, aged 42 years. 


To the Memory of Thomas Abraham, 
of the Civil Service, whose public and private 
worth was familiar to every soul who knew him. 
A long course of useful official labours had estab- 
lished his reputation for indefatigable zeal, and 
the simplest and purest integrity, whilst his 
private life was an unbroken series of benevolent 
sacrifices for the welfare of his family and connec- 
tions, and of the indigent and unfortunate in 
general. He was drowned in crossing the river 
opposite this city, on the evening of the 28th 
March 1818, aged 52 years. 


Snored to the Memory of Robert Eeny. Esq. 
of the Bengal Medical Establishment, who died 
21st March 1813, aged 4 7 years. 


i 

t 

* 


ri 

A 

II 

fti 

h 
J 
j a 





SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Major James Gordon, j 
Deputy Adjutant General to the Bengal Army, J 
who after a lingering illness departed this life on 
l the 12th of June 1817, in the 35th year of his age. 

Blest with an enlightened and a virtuous mind, 
Major Gordon in every situation displayed those 
qualities and professional talents which had 
.early raised him to distinction, and had the fairest 
prospect at no distant period of enjoying in 
his native land, the well earned reward of a life 
jspent in the performance of his duties, but it was 
otherwise decreed, and his early fate affords 
another lesson of the utter vanity of all human 
views that do not look beyond the presentstate, for 
his friends can now only dwell with pleasure on 
those circumstances of his life which led them to 
hope he has exchanged the chequered scenes of 
transitory existence for the joys of eternal bliss. 

Sacred to the Memory of Sarah Catherine, 
the daughter of Lieut. V. Jacob, who departed 
irhis life April 5th 1821, aged 1 yr. and 3 months. 

’’William C. R. Jacob, 

•died 18th July 1827, aged 6 months and 18 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sir John Royds, Knight, 
who for more than 20 years held the high office of 
one of the Judges of his Majesty’s Supreme 
Court of Justice at Fort William in Bengal, during 
which period he conscientiously discharged his 
important duties with honor to himself and with 
advantage to the public, while he benefited and 
adorned the society in which he lived by the 
benevolence of his disposition and the accomplish, 
ments of a scholar and a gentleman. Died on 
the 2 1th September 1817, aged 65 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James William Grant, 
infant son of James William and Margaret Grant, 
born in Calcutta, March 24th, 1822, 
died June 13th, 1822, aged 3 months, 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Charles Barnard, 
horn 15th Aug. 1817, died 4th May 1818. 
Grandson of Brig. Genl. Philip D. A'vergne, 
whose remains are adjacently interred. 

Sacred to the Memory of Philip D'Avergne, 
Biigadier General on the Bengal Establishment, 
who departed this life the 31st day of 
March 1818, aged 55 years. 


To the Memory of James Jameson, Esq. 
Surgeon, Secretary to the Medical Board, 
who died 20th January 1823, aged 35, 
universally respected for his talents and acquire- 
ments, as well as esteemed for every social virtue. 
Here lie the loving husband’s dear remains, 
The tender father and the generous friend. 


Here lies the body of 
Miss Georgiana Tweedale Macleod, 
l third daughter of John Macleod, Esq. of Colbecks, 
who departed this life on the 10th of 
April 1818, aged 19, 

deeply regretted by all who knew her amiable 
qualities. This Monument has been 
erected in testimony of her affection for the 
departed saint by her cousin, 

Jane Elizabeth D Oyly. 
r 


In Memory of a beloved child, 
Charles Palmer, 

the infant son of William Davis, Esq. died 2 1 si 
Sept. 1822, aged 1 year and 5 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert George Hunter Grant, 

died 10th May 1821, aged 2 years and 10 mo3. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charles Child, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 9th of July 1817, 
aged 99 years and 10 months. 

Also Mrs. Elizabeth Child, 

Obit. 31st July 1822, aged 63 years and 8 mos. 

Sacred to the Memory of Andrew Kelso, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 28th of June 1817, 
aged 40 years. 

Erected to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Field, 
who died 3rd October 1817, aged 37 years. 


Mrs. Isabella Evans, 

who departed this life on the 20th Sept. 1835, 
aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
John Ernestus Webster, 

Capt. 22d Regt. N. I. who departed this life 
Jan. 20th, 1822, aged 35 years. 


John A. G. Jameson, 

son of James and Frances Jameson, died 13th 
March 1822, aged 11 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Samuel Isangmaid, Esq. 
who departed this life at Doorgapore, on the 1 0th 
of April 1821, aged 42 years. 


To the Memory of 
Ensign H, Russell, 20th N. I. 
died 10th November 1835. 

Erected by his brother officers, as a lasting 
tribute of their regard. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward FitzGerald, 

late Capt. in TI. M. 87th Regt. died llth 
Dec. 1821, aged 46 years. 

This stone is erected as a token of regard by his 
brother officers. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Walter Cavanagh, 
late Capt. in H. M. 87th Regt. died 18th 
May 1822, aged 39 years. 

This stone is erected as a token of regard by his 
brother officers. 


In Memory of Tboma* Ronald Campbell, 
son of Mr. John Campbell of Riccarton, 
who died on the 14th February 1821, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Harry Brown, 
(Head Tide-waiter, Calcutta Custom House.)’ 
who departed this life on the 31st Dec. 1836, 
aged 77 years and 2 months. 

Sincerely regretted by a large family 
and numerous friends. 

Also his two sons, James, 
died 6th Oct. 1819, aged 14 yrs. 9 ms. A 2 davs 
William, died 4th May 1822, 
aged 33 years, 1 month and 4 days. 


162 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Matilda Brown, 
wife of Mr. Thomas Brown, who departed 
this life on the 2d December 1833, 
aged 22 years, 9 months and 20 days. 

Also her three sons, Thos. Henry, 
died 5th September 1827, aged 8 mos. & 5 days. 

Samuel George, died 13th May 1830, 
aged 5 months and 24 days. 

Thos. Alexander, died 17th April 1835, 
aged 2 years, 11 months and 10 days. 


This Monument is erected by an afflicted sister 
to the memory of an only and beloved 
brother, George Benjamine Keene, 

departed this life on board the “ Sophia” Pilot 
Schooner, March 2 / th, 1819, aged 31 years. 

“ Jesus saith unto her, thy brother shall 
rise again. — John 11. v. 23. 


In Memory of James Toussaint, Esq. 
died 1st September, 1836, aged 21 years. 


Mr. X>. Kossaclt, Master Pilot, 
in the Honorable Company’s Service, 
died 15th September 1802, aged 40 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Robert Baird, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 30th May 1821, 
aged 30 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss H. M. Cropley, 
who departed this life on the 23d of May 1821, 
aged 1 year, 7 months and 14 days. 

Also of Mary, wile of Edward Cropley, 
who died 22d Dec. 1827, aged 45 years. 

Also to the Memory of Miss C. C. Cropley, 
who died on the river off the village of 
Gourepore Matta, near Berhamjmre, 

Nov. 12th, 1831. aged 20 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Matilda, 
daughter of Christopher and Caroline Matilda 
Blake, died 30th of May 1837, 
aged 2 years, 1 month and 14 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Also in Memory of Charles Belph, 
son of Charles Lifford and Charlotte Maria Smartt, 
died 2d Dec. 1841, aged G years and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Aug-ustus Pelly, Esq. 
Lieut. R. N. who died on the 28th July 1820, 
aged 26 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Lieut. P. J. Demoor, 
of 11. M. 17th Regiment, who departed this 
life on the 29th Sept. 1820, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mathew Pickering, 
late of His Majesty’s 17th Regt. died at 
Fort William, 3d Oct. 1820, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant Henry Lewellin, 

of li. M. 24th Regiment Light Dragoons, 
Obit. 11th October 1820, 
aged 38 years, 9 months and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. "W. M. Thomson, H. M. 17th Regt. 
whodeparted this life April 5th, 1819, aged 34 yrs. 
This Monument is erected as a tribute of 
esteem by his brother officers. 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Lambert, Esq. 
son of the late Anthony Lambert, Esq. 
formerly a merchant in this city, who departed 
this life on the 8th July 1819, aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Melton Jones, t 
Harbour Master at the Port of Calcutta, 
i w ho departed this life on the25th day of April 1819, 8 
aged 41 years and 5 months. 

Peace to thy shades, adieu departed w r orth, 

Alas ! here merit moulders into earth. 


To the Memory of Jane, 
daughter of Thos. B. and Mary Scott, 
died 5th May 1819, aged 7 years and 3 months. 
Also Peter, died 13th December 1824, 
aged 9 months and 5 days. 




Sacred to the Memory of Miss Isabella Thomas, 
who departed this life on the 15th of Nov. 1818, 
aged 16 years. 

John Lamb, died 10th May 1820, aged 28 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Joseph Thomson, Esq. 
of Kells, County of Meath, and late of Booglah 
Factory, who departed this life 16th Dec. 1821, 
aged 46 years. 

This is inscribed by his affectionate and 
once happy wife, Catherine. 

’Tis religion can give 
Sweetest pleasures while we live, 

’Tis religion must supply 
Solid comfort wffien we die. 


Sacred to the Memory of Catherine, 
relict of the late Joseph Thomson, Esq. 
ot Booglah Factory, Furreedpore, who departed 
this life at Calcutta on the 2nd of September 1847, 
aged 54 years and 10 months. 

Deeply and sincerely regretted. This Monument is 
erected to her Memory by her affectionate children. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. J. W. Sarel, 
Chief Officer of the Ship Golconda, who departed 
this life on the 7th August 1822, aged 25 years. 


Here lieth the infant daughter of 
R. M. Thomas, Esq. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” 


To the Memory of Miss Rliza Rowe, 
who departed this life on the 14th June 1821, 
aged 3 years and 6 months. 

Sacred to the Memory ofLieut. A. Stewart, 

H. M. 17th Regt. who departed this life 
March 22d, 1819, aged 35 years. 

This Monument is erected as a token of regard i 
by his brother officers. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Meiseibaek 
who departed this life on the 17th July 1834, 
aged 48 years and 9 months. 

This Monument was erected by her affectionate 
sons, R. S. and W. M. Meiselback. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Thomas Kelly, 
Master in the H. C. M. died May 25th, 1822,’ 
aged 32 years and 6 months. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


163 


•Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Ann Kelly, 
who died 11th July 1836, aged 34 years, 

2 months and 9 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Emilie Augusta, 
the affectionate wife of E. White, 
died 12th December 1836, aged 29 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Adams, 
who departed this mortal life the 3rd Sept. 1836, 
aged 34 years. In testimony of whose worth, 
his Monument is erected by her affectionate hus- 
band, James Smith Adams. 


;flcred to the Memory of Miss Adelaide Berrie, 
who departed this life on the 18th of Dec. 1801, 
aged 5 years aud 11 months. 

Also to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Berrie, 
who departed this life on the 1st of July 1833, 
aged 80 years. 

As a small tribute of respect to the Memory of 
departed worth this stone has been placed by 
her daughter, Emma Hubbard. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Henry Coming Ayscough Browne, 

:on of Major Thomas Browne, of Cannonsleigh 
Abbey, Devonshire, who died on the 10th Oct. 
1818, aged 17 years and 7 months. 


Mrs. Helen Aldwell, died 15th Feb. 1821, 
aged 34 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

George Alexander Watson, 

died 7th August 1822, aged 21 months. 


Sacred to departed worth. 

Here lies the remains of John Imlay, 
died 5th June 1822, aged 39 years 3 months. 
In him were united in an eminent degree all the 
virtues of a true Christian ; a tender and 
affectionate husband. His afflicted widow and 
four children wall ever have to lament 
his loss. Ann Imlay. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Anne Isabella Imlay, 

died 21st Sept. 1831, aged 16 years. 

The hand that formed her knew her worth, and 
■ook her amongst His own in heaven. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph ^fifren, 
late Light-house keeper, at Kedgeree, 
died Jan. 12th, 1820, aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Brown, 
ho died on the 17th Dec. 1834, yEtat 36 years. 
Erected by a few of his friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. E. Squire, 
who died 25th June 1835, aged 36 years, 5 mos. 
and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Adelaide Charity, 
infant daughter of Lieut. Richard and Mrs. 
Angelo, 34th Regt. N. I. died 19th Dec. 1832, 
aged 9 months and 25 days. 


In Memory of Lieut. "W. H, Whittle, R. N. 
who departed this life on the 5th June 1822, 
aged 32 years. 

y 2 


In Memory of Mr. Alexander Harper, 
brother of Mr. William Harper of Cornhill, 
London, who departed this life 8th Dec. 1825, 
aged 35 years. 


To the Memory of 
Lieut. Alfred Leonard "Willis, 

32d Regt. N. I. Obit. 1st May 1832, 
yEtat 27 years. 

This stone is erected by his bereaved widow, 
Maria Willis. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Dunn, 
who departed this life on the 27th June 1822, 
aged 35 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Daniel Kinsman, 

born at Falmouth in Nov. 1799, died at Calcutta 
on the 19th June 1837. 

This stone is erected by his affectionate brother, 
Thomas Kinsman. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Archibald, of Dundee, 
late Accountant H. C. New Mint, Obit. 14th 
May 1832, iEtat 29 years and 8 months. 

An honest man, whose gen’rous heart could feel, 
The pang or joy of others’ woe or weal. 

This Monument has been erected by his friends, 
to whom he was affectionately endeared. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. R, J. Jeffreys, 
youngest son of the late Rev. H. Jeffreys, 
Rector of Ilford, Essex, who died on the 
15th Sept. 1834, in the 23d year of his age, 
deeply regretted. 


In Memory of Benjamin DeMayne, 

who died Feb. 8th 1819, aged 31 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann "Wardlow, 
who died 8th May 1835, aged 35 years, 4 months 
and 12 days. 


Life how short eternity how long. 

Sacred to the Memory of Chaidotte Bruce, 
Obit. 23d May 1825, iEtat 25 years, 5 months 
and 17 days. 

Her most deeply afflicted husband, to whom she 
never was the cause of grief, except by her 
premature death, and who is left with five children 
to lament his irreparable loss, has erected this 
tablet sacred to her virtues and to his sorrow. 


In Memory of Jane Radcliffe, 
who departed this life 29th January 1819, 
aged 22 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Ham, 
who departed this life on the 19th of Jan. 1819, 
aged 80 years. 


Sncred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Legli, 
the beloved wife of Mr. W. Legli, who departed 
this life on the 13th April 1831, aged 18 years. 


In Memory of "William, the beloved son ot 
William and Louisa Legh, died 2d June 1836, 
aged 2 years, 3 months and 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Lewis Karaey, 
late Head Clerk of the Police Office, 
who departed this life on the 14th March 1828, 
aged 46 years, 4 months and 20 days. 


IS4 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Isabella Elizabeth Kerr, Alias M oira, 

A Native Christian, who was early brought to the 
knowledge of the truth and enabled to sow 
the seeds of practical piety in the minds 
of her children. These, in committing her dear 
remains to the earth on this spot, record their 
gratitude to God for the comforts and privileges 
she enjoyed during an extended pilgrimage 
of near 70 years, and for the remarkable serenity 
of mind experienced by her in the hour of 
dissolution. Obit. 6th August 1832. 

“ Thy prayers and thine alms are come up for 
a memorial before God.” — Acts, Chap. xv. 4. 


In Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Kerr, 
wife of Mr. John Kerr, Asst, in the Mily Audr. 

Genl’s. Office, died 2d April 1837, 
leaving a disconsolate husband and ten children. 
The unaffected simplicity of her heart, joined 
to a life of virtue, must ever make her 
husband and her children feel and her friends 
lament their irreparable loss. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. John Augustus Kerr, 
who departed this life on the 5th April 1847, 
aged 27 years, 9 months and 28 days, 
Afflictions so long time he bore, 

Physicians strove in vain, 

Till God did please that death should come, 
And ease him of his pain. 

This Tablet is placed by his afflicted widow r 
as a Memorial of that goodness of heart, 
benevolence of disposition, and amiability of 
temper which endeared him to all his relations 
and secured to him the affection of a large 
circle of friends. 

1 ' There the wicked cease from troubling, and 
there the weary are at rest.” — Job iii. 17. 


James Lewis Jackson, 

died 17th April 1825, aged 25 yrs. and 7 mos. 


Sacred to the Memory of John Driver, 
late of Babookholly, Indigo Planter, who 
departed this life on the 25th day of April 
A. D. 1822, aged 47 years 8 months. 
Regretted by his friends and relations, and sin- 
cerely lamented by his widow and children. 


Monsr. Dimitri Robertson, 

died 23d Dec. 1837, aged 30 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. G. J. Verboon, 
who departed this life on the 5th March 
1831, aged 56 years. 

A tender parent, a sincere friend, 

Lov’d in his life and lamented in his end. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
wife, Juliana Verboon. 


In Memory of Mrs. Mary Ogg, 
died 9th Dec. 1837, aged 40 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. T. J. Shaw, 
who departed this life on the 30th Jan. 
1816, aged 18 years and 5 months. 

“ Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.” 


Here lies the body of Capt. David D. Mill, 
of Philadelphia, who died on the 
4th June 1818, aged 31 years. 


In Memory of the infant and youngest son of 
Samuel Hampton, Esq. 
born 3d of Dec. 1818, died 12th of July 1819, 
aged 7 months and 9 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles Jacob, 
the beloved son of Robert and Rachel 
Arrowsmith, (II. C. Marine,) died 24th May 
1835, aged 3 years, 5 months and 28 days. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away ; 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


In Memory of Mr. Thomas Gurr, Master Pilot, 
who was lost by the wreck of the Ship 
Raj Ranee on the eastern reef, on the 1 st of Augt. 
1838, aged 45 years, 4 months and 12 days. 
He was a loving and an affectionate husband. 
My Saviour shall my soul restore, 

And raise me from my dark abode, 

My flesh and soul shall part no more, 

But dwell for ever near my God. 

This tablet is inscribed by his disconsolate 
wife, Maria Gurr. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. 'William Spence, 
Master Pilot, who departed this life on the 
27th of July 1838, aged 40 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a tender father 
and a sincere friend ; leaving a disconsolate 
w r ife and seven children to lament 
their irreparable loss. 

Go home my friends, and cease your tears, 

I must lie here till Christ appears, 

Repent in time, while time you have, 

There’s no repentance in the grave. 


To the Memory of Jane Spence, 
daughter of Mr. W. Spence, H. C. Marine, 
died 22d Feb. 1832, aged 8 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Andrew Goldsmith, 
and Clara Goldsmith, son and mother. 
The former, who died on the 7th July 1837, 
aged 26 years, 3 months and 14 days. 

And the latter, who died on the 
31st May 1838, aged 65 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Thomas Hutt, 
died 17th Jan. 1826, aged about 36 years. 


To the Memory of J. F. O. Hand, 
who departed this life 26th April 1833. 
in the 33rd year of his age. 


Mrs. M. R. Hand, 

died 17th December 1838, aged 32 years. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed he the name of the Lord. Amen.” 


Mrs. C. Hand, died 9th July 1834, aged 29 years. 

Mr. S. R. Harvey, died 25th Jan. 1835, 
aged 20 years, 9 months and 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Miss M. A. h. Harvey 
who departed this life on the 1 7 th of March 1845, 
aged 34 years, 5 months and 4 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Henry Baker, 
late 3rd officer of the H. C. ship “ Coldstream,’ 
who departed this life on the 4th Nov. 1815, 
■riitatis 27. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


165 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Jolm Popliam Watson, 
ofH.M. 75th Regt. of Foot, who departed this 
life the 8th June 1804, aged 31 years. 

In the same tomb are enterred the remains of his 
kinsman, Ensign Edw Anth. Hull, a youth 
of the sweetest disposition and fairest promise, 
who died on the ‘23rd December 1817, 
iEt. 16 years and 4 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of Isabella, wife of 
the late G. Daniel, of the H. E. I. C. Marine, 
died 5th March 1831, aged 72 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas, the lady of 
Mr. John Thomas, died 25th May 1825, 
aged 32 years, 2 months and 21 days, 
leaving a disconsolate husband and six children 
with a numerous circle of friends to bewail her 
irreparable loss. She was beloved and respected 
by all her friends and acquaintances. 

Sacred to the Memory of Miss Eliza Deverell, 
died the 12th April 1819, aged 7 years. 


The family Monument of William Smith, 
of the Political Office. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Margaret Statham, wife of 
Mr. H. G. Statham, who departed this life on the 
5th August 1832, aged 25 years. 

Also her infant child died on the 10th Jan. 1831, 
aged 1 month and 10 days. 


And in Memory of 
Margaret Isabella Statham, 

born 18th April 1832, died 31st March 1833. 


Miss L. A. M. Hart, 

died 13th July 1828, aged 3 months and 20 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Hastings Lane, who departed this life 
on the 10th Jan. 1826, aged 20 yrs. aud 8 mos. 
This Monument is raised by his most affectionate 
mother, lamenting the premature death of a 
most beloved son. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Catherine Greene, 
whose exemplary discharge of her several duties 
to her God, to her family and to society, 
eminently entitled her to respect in this world, 
and it is humbly and devoutly hoped has secured 
to her eternal life and bliss, where sickness, pain 
and sorrow cannot enter. She died on the 20th 
of January 1811, aged 34 years. 


M. O’Neale, 

departed this life on the 13th July 1827, 
aged 42 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Miss Eliza Allan, 
daughter of the late Mr. S. C. Allan, of the 
Revenue Board Office, died 25th Nov. 1826, 
aged 15 years, 5 months and 18 days. 

Also of her uncle, Mr. James O’Neale, 
who lies interred in the same tomb, died 16th 
January 1827, aged 27 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mr. S. C. Allan, 
Obit. 31st Jan. 1826, iEt. 39 years. 
Requiescat in pace. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sarah Ann Burridge, 

daughter of Joseph and Catharine Burridge, 
who departed this life on the 14th Dec. 1825, 
aged 5 years, 10 months and 8 days. 

Also James Peter Burridge, 
son of J. and C. Burridge, who departed this 
life on the 26th July 1826, aged 20 days. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Catherine Burridge, 
who died on the 23d of Nov. 1830, 
aged 27 years, 7 months and 14 days. 

Also Sacred to the Memory of 
Joseph Burridge, Master in the H. C. B. Marine, 
w'ho departed this life on the 27th June 1832. 
on board the H. C. Vessel “ Experimental,” 
on his return from Ghazeepore, aged 38 years. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Mary Laine, Sr. 
died Aug. 18th, 1820, aged 47 years. 

In Memory of John Thomas Lane, 

•who departed this life 9th October 1826, 
aged 20 years, 4 months. 

This Monument is raised by an afflicted mother, 
bereaved of the only two sons she w r a.s blest with. 

“ I shall go to them, but they shall not return 
to me.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. James Horatio Howe, 
w'ho departed this life on the 17th July 1832, 
aged 21 years and 7 months. 

“ Affection’s last sad tribute.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. A. Peterson, 
who died 5th of Sept. 1829, aged 39 years 
and 6 months. 

This inscription is inscribed by his affectionate 
wife, E. Peterson. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret "Williams, 
who departed this life on the 9th March 1828, 
aged 22 years. 

Reader, pause and reflect for a while, 

This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 

With sickness I w r as sore opprest, 

Kind death has eas’d me, I lie here at rest. 
This tomb is erected by her most sincere and 
affectionate friend, B. H. 


E. H. M. 16th July 1819. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James "William Higgins, H. C. S. 

died 23d Aug. 1845, aged 18 years and 3 months. 
Son of J. W. Higgins, Branch Pilot, who was 
drowned in the Hurricane of 1833, with all 
hands, off Saugor Point in charge of 
ship “ Sultan.” 


In Memory of Thomas Martin, 

was drowned 25th May 1813, aged 28 years, 
5 months and 1 1 days. 

Also T. Martin, his son, died 30th May 1827, 
aged 18 years, 5 months and 27 days. 


Also to the Memory of James Howell, 
who died Sept. 13th, 1833, aged 33 years, 
3 months and 7 days. 


166 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory Miss Mary ’Woodin, 
died 25th Sept. 1837, aged 42 years, 8 months 
and 25 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Hannah Brough, 
who died on the 29th of July 1821, aged 49 yrs. 
Erected by Miss William in token of regard. 

Charlotte Sophia Lund, 

born 14th Jan. 1809, died 1st August 1821. 


Sacred to the Memory of Bella Penelope, 
the infant daughter of John Adrian and Mary 
Ann Ryper, who departed this life on the 13th 
of June 1831, aged 10 months and 20 days. 


Here lieth the mortal remains of 
Miss Mary Anne Ryper, 
who departed this life on the 24th of Nov. 1832, 
aged 30 years, 2 months and 16 days. 
Snatch’d by untimely death reposeth here 
A virtuous wife, a friend and parent dear ; 

Her children’s sorrow and her husband’s grief 
This stone may speak ; but nought can give 
relief ; 

With her this tomb may perish in decay, 

But death alone can wipe their tears away. 

This Monument is erected by her affectionate 
husband, J. A. R. 


Eliza Matilda Smith, 

daughter of Cors. and Elizabeth Smith, Nat. 12th 
Feb. 1816, Obit. 21st May 1819. 


Harriet Stewart Bayley, 

the infant daughter of W. B. Bayley, Esq. 
born December 23d, 1817, died June 6th, 1819. 


Frederick Ruddell Jackson, 

son of Capt. James Nesbitt Jackson, died 13th 
Aug. 1823, aged 2 years and 7 months. 

Maria, the infant daughter of 
Alexander Colvin, Esq. born 25th, died 31st 
of December 1823. 

Likewise an infant son, born and died 13th of 
June 1825. Likewise Maria, his infant 
daughter, born and died 28th of Aug. 1838. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Peter Emanuel Kramer, 

son of the late Adjutant Kramer of the Dutch 
Company’s Service, Chinsurah, who departed this 
life July 23d, 1804, aged 15 years. 


To the Memory of the infant son of 

Charles Buller, 

born August 26th, 1811, died October 9th, 
aged 44 days. 


Here lies the mortal remains of a dear infant, 
the daughter of R. DeCourcy, Esq. 
who died on the 30th May 1822. 


Sacred to the Memory of Theodore Henry, 
the infant son of Theodore and Maria Dickens, 
born Feb. 14th, died Oct. 14th 1828. 


M ary Frances Vincentia, 

the daughter of George and Pulcherie Money, 
born Nov. 5th, 1817, died Feb. 20th, 1820. 


In Memory of Mbs Mary Ann Tyler, . 
died 24th April 1821, aged 8 mos. and 19 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Horatio Augustus, 
died 19th Dec. 1830, aged 4 mos. and 19 days. 
Ebenezer, died 16th July 1832, 
aged 8 months and 17 days. 
Rebecca, died 29th August 1835, 
aged 1 month 13 days ; 

David, died 1 8th of Dec. 1838, aged 2 days. 
Children of Joseph and Alary Richardson. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary, the wife of 
Mr. Joseph Richardson, who slept in Jesus the 
27th of December 1838, 
aged 38 years and 11 days. 

When sorrow weeps o’er virtue’s sacred dust, 

Our tears become us and our grief is just ; 

Such are the tears he sheds who grateful pays 
This last sad tribute of his love and praise ; 

Who mourns the best of wives and friends com- 
bin’d, 

Where female softness meet a manly mind ; 
Mourns but not murmurs, weeps but not despairs, 
Feels as a man but as a Christian bears. 


Sacred to the Memory of John, 

5th son of Mr. Joseph Richardson, died 30th 
April 1839, aged 15 years, 3 months and 27 days, 
deservedly regretted by his surviving parent. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. James Greene, of the Bengal Artillery, 
born 18th of April 1805, Hied of the 
Arracan Fever on the 5th October 1825. 

His gallant conduct at Arracan gained him the 
respect of his corps, and his amiable 
manners endeared him to his relations and friends. 


Edward Abbott, 

Obit. 27th July 1829, ^Etat. 5 days. 
And his mother, Lucy Maria, wife of 
William Henry Abbott of Calcutta, Esquire, 
born 4th April 1799, died 30th April 1835, 
aged 36 years. 


Also Charles, son of the said 
W. H. Abbott, and Lucy Maria his wife, 
born 9th June 1825, died 2d April 1845, 
aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Amelia, 
infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morrell, 
born on the 19th and died on the 
25th of April 1833. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Edward Robert Maldan Hudson, 

the dearly loved child of Nathaniel and Margaret 
Hudson, who departed this life on the 29th 
June 1821, aged 4 years, 9 months and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of William, 
the infant son of Captain W. J. Crawley, 
who departed this life September 20th, 1833, 
aged 1 month and 16 days. 

This Monument has been erected by his affec- 
tionate mother, Elizabeth Crawley. 


At the instance of Captain Thos. Larkins, 
and to the Memory of Thomas Poynting, Esq. 
Commander of tlie Ship “ Resolution,” in the 
service of the United Company of Merchants of 
England trading to the East Indies, w'.io 
most bravely defended the “ Resolutio i.” 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


167 


Sacred to the Memory of John Stark, 
who departed this life on the 13th October 1838, 
aged 34 years, 9 months and 3 days, 
leaving a widow and eight children. 

“ I was dumb ; I opened not my mouth because 
thou didst it.’* — Ps. 39. v. 9. 


In Memory ofWilliara Hig'gins, 
of Snowland, Kent, late Commander of the 
Steamer “ Forbes,” who died 
8th August 1841, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Harriet Botelho, 
the beloved wife of Mr. Robert Botelho, 
who departed this life on the 6th of Nov. 1840, 
aged 23 years, 9 months and 22 days. 

Mr. Robert Botelho, 

who departed this life on the 6th of Aug. 1841, 
aged 25 years, 7 months and 26 days. 

Caroline, 

the beloved wife of Mr. Francis Botelho, 
who departed this life 14th Dec. 1841, aged 22 yrs. 
Oh ! early snatch’d from all who held her dear ; 
As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her’s to earth is seldom giv’n, 

Too good to dwell with us, she’s gone to heaven. 

Robert, the infant son of Mr. Robert Botelho, 
who departed this life 17th March 1844, 
aged 3 years, 4 months and 29 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Horton, 
wdio departed this life on the 9th April 1840, 
aged 37 years and 3 months. 

“ Blessed are those who die in the Lord, from 
I hencefore, yea saith the Spirit, for they rest from 
I their labours.” 


Also Sacred to the Memory of 
my beloved son-in-law, W. N. Dodd, 
who departed this life on the 29th August 1840, 
aged 26 years and 7 months. 


Sacred to the Memory cf Mr. John Owens, 
who died 23rd March 1840, aged 49 years. 
This stone is placed by his affectionate wife. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. William Hodges, 
who departed this life on the 13th Nov. 1842, 
aged 37 years and 9 months, deeply regretted. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Amelia Christiana Mackintosh, 
born 15th December 1839, died 26th June 1844, 
aged 5 years, 6 months and 12 days. 

’Tis to the infant dead, 

The blessed word is giv’n 

Their Angels live ! the Saviour said, 

Round the bright throne in Heuv’n. 

No storms these stainless flow’rs shall tear, 

The snow drops never wither there. 


In Memory of 'William Conner "Walker, 

Midshipman of the Merchant Ship 
Owen Glendower,” who was unfortunately 
drowned 22nd Nov. 1840, aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Thomas Palmer, 

son of Henry and Elvira Louisa Palmer, 
died 30th May 1841, aged 8 months and 10 days. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me and 
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
God.” 

Also in Memory of his grandmother, 

Mrs. Charlotte Champenois, 

died 21st January 1842, aged 47 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James George 'Wadsworth Ceronio, 

who departed this life on the 5th Aug. 1839, 
aged 30 years and 15 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Air. John Otto, 
son of the late Captain Rowley Otto, 
who departed this life on the 9th Dec. 1839, 
aged 41 years. 

This Monument is erected by his mother, 
Bebee Khanum. 


Here lies Mrs. Elizabeth Ridley, 

wife of Air. John Ridley, senr. died August 1808. 

Miss Caroline Ridley, 

daughter of Mr. John Ridley, senr. 
died 6th September 1833. 


Miss Emelia Ridley, 

daughter of Mr. John Ridley Junr. 
died 25th July 1842. 


Airs. Charlotte Frances Ridley, 

wife of Air. John Ridley, junr. 
died 11th November 1844, 
aged 24 years, 8 months and 28 days. 

Sacred to the Alemory of 
Air. John Caird, Liveiy Stable Keeper, 
died 19 th January 1841, 
aged 40 years, 2 months and 10 days. 

Life how short, eternity how long. 

Sacred to the Alemory of Alfred, 
the beloved son of Mr. J. A. and Airs. C. Ryper, 
died 6th March 1844, aged 2 ms. and 5 dys. 
Sleep on sweet child and take thy rest, 

God calls first those whom he loves best. 


Sacred to the Alemory of Elizabeth, 
the beloved wife of Mr. Alexander Dozey, junr. 
who departed this life on the 23d March 1844, 
aged 23 years, 3 months and 7 days. 

O ! early snatch’d from all who held her dear, 
As friend, wife, mother, she was matchless here ; 
Virtue like her’s to earth is seldom given, 

Too good to dwell with us, she’s gone to heaven. 


Sacred to the Alemory of Air. A. Dozey, Senr. 
who departed this life on the 1st July 1845, 
aged 52 years, 5 months and 12 days. 
Reader ! pause and reflect for a while, 

This is the sure place to rest from toil ; 

With sickness I was sore opprest, 

Kind death has eas’d me, I lie here at rest. 


Ici repose Pauline Thonon, 

Decedee la 30 Mars 1842, son Arne este Avec 
dien priez pour ceux qui survivent. 


L 




168 SOUTH TARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Alexander Frederick Ryper, 

died 16th April 1839, aged 1 year, 

10 months and 17 days. 

Bright as the star that sparkles in the west, 
Pure as the dew-drop on the lily’s breast, 
He came awhile to tremble and to shine, 
Then rose like incense to the eternal shrine. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
H enry 'William Kahn, 

died 22d April 1841, aged 3 years, 
10 months and 4 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Gustaphe Emanuel Kuhn, 
who departed this life on the 27tli Oct. 1841, 
aged 8 years, 8 months and 14 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Adeline Kuhn, 
who departed this life on the 17th June 1846, 
aged 17 years and 2 months. 

Sacred to the Memory of D. F. Rodrigues, Esq. 
who departed this life 25th May 1841, 
aged 48 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Manuel Payne, 
who departed this life 27th Feb. 1844, 
aged 38 years, 7 months and 6 days. 


And his wife, Elizabeth Payne, 

who departed this life 20th May 1844, 
aged 32 years, 2 months and 8 days. 


Mr Henry Phillips, 

died 24th Aug. 1841, aged 38 years. 

This is inscribed by his brother, Francis Botelho. 

Sacred to the Memory of Joseph Hatton, 
who departed this life on the 3d Sept. 1839, 
aged 8 years and 2 days. 

Elizabeth Morley, 

who departed this life 13th Feb. 1840, 
aged 5 years, 9 months and 8 days. 

Also to the Memory of Henry Hatton, 
who departed this life on the 6th Nov. 1840, 
aged 40 years. 

Father of the above. 

This Monument is erected by his affectionate 
widow. 


Also Mrs. Eugenia Danclas, 

who departed this life 4th Dec. 1841, aged 40yrs. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Samuel Cook, Engineer, H. C. S. 
who died 9th May 1840, aged 26 years, 11 mos. 
and 22 days. 

How t fleeting and transitory is life, and how sure 
and certain is death. 


In Memory of Mrs. E. Leard, 
died 31st May 1841, aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Charles Maclean Pratt, 

died 7th July 1840, aged 59 years. 
“ Thy will be done.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Hind, 
died 11th Feb. 1811, aged 13 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Susan Cecilia, 
wife of Mr. F. Fantom, and daughter of the late 
Mr. J. Mills, who departed this life on the 9th 
November 1842, aged 26 years, 5 months 
and 27 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Sophia, the dearly beloved wife of 
Captain H. A. Boscawen, 54th Regt. B. N. I. 
and the dutiful and affectionate daughter of the 
late Sophia and W. C. Hollings, Esq. 

It pleased God to take her unto himself on the 
15th day of Feb. 1842, in the 32d year of her age, 
after a painful illness of a few hours. 

This Monument is erected to her Memory by her 
sorrowing husband, as a tribute of fond and 
devoted attachment. 

“Be merciful to me, O God, be merciful unto 
me, for my soultrusteth in thee, yea in the shadow 
of thy wings, will I make my refuge until these 
calamities be overpast.” — Ps. 57. v. 1. 

“ For I know that thou wilt bring me to death 
and to the house appointed for all living.” — Job 
30. v. 23. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. P. G. Robertson, 

71st Regt. N. I. and second in command of the 
Kotah Contingent, who was killed at Bissulpore, 
on the Bonass, the 12th February 1844, by the 
accidental discharge of his rifle. 

This tablet is erected by an affectionate wife, 
brother and sister as a token of love towards a 
deeply lamented husband and brother. 


In Memory of 

John Hutcheson Fergusson, 

youngest son of William Fergusson, Inspector 
General of Hospitals II. M. Sendee, who died 22d 
November 1832, aged 22 years. 

This stone is erected by his affectionate brothers 
William and James Fergusson. 


Sacred to the Memory of Eliza, wife of 
Mr. Edward Davy Fabian, Seinor Branch Pilot, 
who departed this life on the 2d August 1843, 
aged 44 years and 10 months. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. George Mafliu, 
of the H. C. Marine, who died 3rd June 1834, 
aged 29 years. 

Good Christians on me cast an eye, 

As you are now, so once was I, 

As I am now, so you must be, 

So then prepare to follow me. 

Erected by Mr. E. D. Fabian. 


Sacred to the Memory of Abraham Perse 
the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Fabian, 
who died 2d May 1845, aged S months 
and 17 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. R. T. Arrowsmith, 

died 1st May 1840, aged 33 years, 3 months 
ancl 25 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


IC9 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Frederick Fabian, 

who departed this life on the Oth Aug. 1845, 
aged 22 years, 1 1 months and 22 days. 

This tablet is erected by his affectionate brother, 
A. Fabian. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Georgiana Eliza Sage, 
who died on the 7th May 1840, aged 3 years, 

6 months and 11 days. 

This tablet is erected by her afflicted mother. 
Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from 
me, nevertheless not my will but thine be done. 


Sacred to the Memory of the infant daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Turner, born 23d Nov. 
1844, died 16th Jan. 1845. 


In Memory oflOupre Francis John, 

iiy child of Lieut. G. W. Bishop, 71st Regt. N. I. 
died 4th July 1840, aged 0 months and 22 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Major ‘W. Baillie, 
of the Engineers, who departed this life on 
the 6th June 1799, aged 46 years. 

Also Mrs. A. M. Baillie, relict of the above, 
who died on the 27th April 1840, aged 67 years. 
This tablet is erected by their three children. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Cullen, Esq. 

eminently distinguished for a most ardent 
attachment to his family, as a son and brother, 
In the kind affections of the heart, endearing, 
the friend and the companion, equalled 
by few. In the upright integrity of character, 
distinguishing the merchant and the man, 
surpassed by none, and by all who cultivated his 
acquaintance and knew his worth, 
Esteemed and beloved. He died 14th June 1841, 
aged 45 years and 6 months. 


A tribute of affection to the Memory of 
L. F. Bourkey, who died at sea 
on the 21st June 1840, aged 29 years. 

Also his only child, Sophia BJora, 
who died at Calcutta on the 25th Dec. 
1842, aged 3 years, 3 months and 15 days. 


Louisa, the beloved wife of 
dev. R. B. Boswell, Chaplain, B. S., and daughter 
of Sir A. Dunbar of Northfield, Baronet. 

Born at Duffers house, Morayshire, 24th Aug. 1812. 
Relying on the only Saviour of truth, 
washed in His atoning blood, 
she had peace with God. 

If thou our Saviour still art nigh, 

Cheerful we live and cheerful we die ; 

Secure when human comforts flee, 

To find ten thousand worlds in thee. 


Sacred to the Memory of Margaret Jemima, 

' the beloved child of Charles and Harriet Lyall, 
who departed this life the 21st March 1840, 
aged 1 year, 9 months and 24 days. 

41 Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. John Bagnall, 
who died 6th April 1844, 
aged 25 years, 7 months and 20 days. 


In Memory of Edward D’Oyly Harwell, Esq. 
Barrister at Law, who died November Oth, 1840, 
aged 30 years, 7 months and 1 7 days. 

“ I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me 
write, blessed are tlie dead which die in the Lord 
from henceforth, yea, saitli the spirit, that they 
may rest from their labours.” 

Also in Memory of 
Edward Henry Colquhoun, 
the infant son of Edward D’Oyly Barwell, Esq. 

and Anna Maria Louisa his wife, 
died April 27th, 1840, aged 1 year and 3 days. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of Heaven.” 

This tribute to his Memory was erected by 
his affectionate widow. 


Sacred to the Memory of Frances Mary, 
the beloved wife of Lieut. Fredck. B. Wardroper, 
B. N. I. who died on the 14th Dec. 1841, 
deeply lamented by a bereaved husband. 

Also to the Memory of her beloved brother, 
Francis Howard 'White, 

Obit. 26th November 1830, iEtat 21. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Louisa Gordon, 
died June 4th, 1834, aged 37 years. 

An affectionate wife and a tender mother ; and of 
George Johnston Phillips, born 8th July 1813, 
who was drowned at Sulkeah on the 8 th 
December 1836, aged 23 years and 5 months. 

“ Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O 
Lord.” 

Also of John George Phillips, Junr. 
born 30th June 1824, and died 5th April 1841. 
aged 16 years, 9 months and 5 days. 

‘ ‘ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of John Smith, Esq. 
formerly of Chowgutcha, Jessore, 
died 7th Feb. 1844, aged 20 years. 


In Memory of Sophia Emelia, 

infant daughter of Frederick and Maria Millett, 
died 14th October 1841, aged 5 days. 


Here lieth the mortal remains of 
Alexander Fraser, Esq. Born at Ruthven 4th 
Aug. 1805, died at Calcutta 20th August 1835. 
Also George Walker 'Wilson Fraser, Esq. 
who departed this life the 26th November 1843. 
Sons of George Fraser, Esq. of Manchester. 


To the Memory of Ensign H. Bussell, 

26th Regt. N. I. died 10th November 1833. 
Erected by his brother officers as a lasting tribute 
of their regard. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Anne Imlay, 
widow of the late Mr. John Imlay, who departed 
this life on the 20th July 1843, aged 47 years, 

1 month and 17 days. 

This tablet over the remains of a beloved parent 
is consecrated to departed worth, as affection’s 
last tribute, by her sorrowing family. 


z 


170 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


In Memory of Thomas Coni-an, 

died 8th Dec. 1840, aged 9 yrs. 2 mos. and 20 days. 
Erected by his affectionate mother. 

Sacred to the Memory of Charles Remfry, Esq. 
died on the 11th May 1841, aged 23 years, 

1 month and 11 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Jamesina Remfry, wife of 
Henry Ramfry, Esq. Attorney at Law, who departed 
this life on the 1st July 1844, aged 18 years, 

7 months and 24 days. 


In Memory of Mr. Isaac Myers, 
of the IL C. Bengal Marine, died 10th Jany. 1821, 
aged 70 years, 8 months and 26 days. 

This tablet is erected by his son, R. Myers. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James Edwin Gouldin, who departed this life 
on the 16th March 1840, aged 12 years, 7 months 
and 7 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Cearns, 
Branch Pilot H. C. S. who died Feb. 21st 1844, 
aged 49 years and 6 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Matthews, 
who died 23rd March 1838, aged 75 years. 


In Memory of Alexander Heriewood, 

the beloved son of Mr. Joseph and the late 
Mrs. J. L. Bowers, who died 9th February 1840, 
aged 21 years, 1 month and 27 days. 

Sacred to the Memory of Harriet, fourth daughter 
of the late Lieut. -Col. T. Featherstone, 
died 12th August 1840, aged 32 years. 
Farewell, but not for ever. 

“ I was dumb, I opened not my mouth because 
thou didst it.” 


Here lieth Samuel Chollett Hornett, 

born 7th January 1807, died 19th January 1839. 

Blessed are they who have fallen asleep in Jesus ; 
who are sheltered in His bosom from every blast ; 
whose warfare is accomplished and who have reach- 
ed the heaven of unceasing rest. 


In Memory of Charlotte Sara, infant child of 
Lewis Dacosta, died 25th August 1843, 
aged 17 months. 


In Memory of Charlotte Mary, 

the faithful wife of Captain H. M. Potter, 
died 10th April 1839, aged 24 years and 8 months. 
Also of his infant daughter, aged 9 months 
and 2 days. 


Here lieth the remains of two infant children of 
Edward Hamilton and Georgiana Currie, 
who died at sea on the 27th August 1837, 
aged 8 months and 3 days. 

And Edward, who died at Chowringhee 
19th Aug. 1839, aged 12 months and 20 days. 
In the same grave lie the remains of John, 
third son of Edward and Georgiana Currie, 
born 1st September 1839, died 5th April 1840. 


To the Memory of Maria, 
wife of Arthur Johnson, Esq. died 8th July 1818, 
aged 32 years. 


Here reposeth the mortal remains of 
Mr. Coote W. McNeelance, 

Assistant to Messrs. Holmes & Co. who departed 
this life on the 2d Nov. 1844, aged 31 years 
and 6 months. 

Erected by his office-mates and workmen of the 
Establishment, as a mark of their 
esteem and respect. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
James Addison "Webster, 

who departed this life 10th Sept. 1817, aged 79 yrs. 

Boreas’ blasts and Neptune’s waveshave tossed me 
to and fro, 

But to an anchor I am come and safely here 
below ; 

At an anchor T do ride with many in the fleet, 
And once again we shall set sail our Lord and 
Christ to meet. 


Here lieth the body of 
William Hole Wicholetts, Esq. 
Assistant Surgeon on this establishment, 
who departed this life 9th day of March 1816, 
aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Frederick Richardson, 
who departed this life on the 2d Dec. 1819, 
aged 5 days. 

Also of Christopher Harton Richardson, 

removed from this world after long and severe 
illness, on the 13th July 1823, aged 5 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Richardson, Esq. 
parent of these two little boys, who expired on 
the 19th Nov. 1823, aged 50 years. 

As a husband, father and friend, a worthy and 
honorable member of society, he will ever be 
deeply regretted by all who knew him in 
these endearing and valuable characters. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Alline Maria Miller, 

who departed this life on the 11th of Dec. 1819, 
aged 23 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Kirby, 
the wife of G. D. B. Kirby, who departed thii 
life Sept. 1st, 1836, aged 31 years, 5 months 
and 13 days. 

Also to their two dear infants, 

Mary Emma, 

aged 1 year, 6 months and 27 days, 
died Aug. 30th 1836. 

William George, 
died Aug. 24th, 1836, aged 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. James Murray, 

late of the H. C. Marine, who departed this lifi 
on the 16th day of Oct. 1819, aged 34 years, 
6 months and 12 days. 

This Monument is erected as a lasting testimor 
of his many virtues, by his affectionate brother 
Thomas Murray. 

From all the various ills below, 

Safe doth my brother sleep ; 

His heart no greater pangs shall know, 
His eyes no more shall weep. 




. 

U 


<• 

? 

V 

tit 


I. 


t £ 

tah 

(101 


,a\ 


. 8 ' 


i 

* 

at 

la 


ii 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


171 


To the Memory ol Alexander Robertson, 

Member of the firm of Davidson, Robertson &Co. 

who died 15th January 1822, aged 42 years. 

He possessed in an eminent degree an intelligent 
active mind, with the utmost candour, 
generosity and sincerity of heart. 

He was beloved and esteemed by an extensive 
; circle of friends, who deeply lament his loss. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Curtis, 
who departed this life on the 29th Dec. 1829, 
aged 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Joseph Greenway, Esq. 
departed this life 25th November 1819, 
aged 38 years 10 months. 
lErected by his wife, A. E. Greenway, in testimony 
of his departed worth. 


Here rest the remains of George 'W'oodward, 
late Comdr. of the ship “ Bengal,” of Liverpool, 
who died on the 14th Nov. 1819, aged 29 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Richard Welsh, 

1st officer of the country ship “ Eliza,” 

Obit, the 31st March 1813, iEtat 23 years. 
The death of this young man was occasioned by 
a fatal explosion of three barrels of gunpowder, 
mear Moyapore, on Friday the 19th March 1813. 
T. E. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Thomas Cottrell, Senr. 
twenty-five years an inhabitant of Calcutta, 
who departed this life on the 30th day of 
Nov. 1823, aged 63 years. 

This Monument is erected by his only and affec- 
rtionate son as a tribute of respect to his Memory. 

In Memory of Ensign Js. Underwood, 

H. M. 47th Regiment, died April 14th, 1819, 
aged 45 years. 


R. D. S. 

A tribute to departed worth, 
July 1st, 1819. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

■ Mrs. Mary Sophia Napier, 

who departed this life on the 23d of June 1818, 
aged 28 years. 


• Sacred to the Memory of Mr. James Edwards, 
who departed this life on the 6 th 
day of October 1818, aged 33 years. 

•This Monument is erected by his affectionate wife 
as a lasting tribute to his many virtues. 

When living beloved ; to all relations true, 
Exposed to follies, but inclined to few ; 
Reader, reflect and copy if you can 
The social virtues of this worthy man. 

Sacred to the Memory of William Hastie, 
who departed this life on the 30th of 
November 1818, aged 41 years. 


In Memory of Mr. A. Ilorsburgb, 
died 23d July 1833, aged 31 years. 

z 2 


Here are deposited the remains of 
Gregory Jackson, Esq. 
many years Company’s Agent for loading 
and unloading the Honorable Company's Ships 
at Kedgeree, born the 10th April Anno 
Domini 1765, and departed this life the 5th 
July 1815, aged 56 years. 

He was an affectionate husband, a fond father 
and sincere friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of Alexander Robertson, 
late Cooper and Wine merchant in Calcutta, 
fifth son of Thomas Robertson, Merchant, 
in Peterhead, Scotland, who died the 31st of 
Dec. 1807, aged 41 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
V/illiam Henry Dove, 

the infant son of Robert and Ellen Maling, 
born 8th June 1836, died 9th June 1837. 
Raised by his distressed parents. 


Sacred to the Memory of Joseph Hodges, 
eldest son of Captain Joseph Hodges, 
of the Country Service, who departed this life 
on the 12th Jan. 1827, aged 33 yrs. 5 mos. 

Also of Sarah Elizabeth Greig, 

daughter of Capt. Jasepb Hodges, 
and wife of the late Capt. John Greig, 
who died 1st March 1827, aged 26 yrs. 2 mo 3 . 
This Monument is erected as a token of 
affection and regret by their afflicted parents. 


Mrs. Elizabeth Howard, widow 
of Mr. William Howard, 
who departed this life on the 6th Sept. 1825, 
aged 77 years 8 months. 

Resting in peace in the hope of a blessed 
resurrection. 

Also sacred to the Memory of 
Robert Howard, Esq. who departed this life 
on the 6th Jan. 1831, aged 41 years, 

8 months and 9 days. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth.” 


To the Memory of Mary Anne, 
wife of Wm. Linton, Esq. born 14th Oct. 1806 , 
married 21st Feb. 1825 ; died 4th Jan. 1847. 
And of James Henry, 
born 22d Dec. 1827 ; died 4th Dec. 1828. 
Roza, born 2d June 1838 ; died 19th June 1839. 
Henry Parker, born 11th Dec. 1840 , 
died 10th June 1842. 

George, born 15th December 1844, 
died 8th Dec. 1845, children of the above 
Wm. Linton and Alary Anne, his wife. 

Tn Memory also ol William Einfcon, 
horn 19th Nov. 1819, died 19th April 1823. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Caroline Foierell, wife of Mr. J. Poicrell, 
who departed this life on the 2nd Aug. 1839, 

I aged 20 years, 9 months and 29 days. 

She was exemplary in her conduct as a wife and 
mother, and her loss will be long felt by her 
! relatives and friends, to whom she was endeared by 
her kindness of heart and amiability of disposition 
Here also lies the remains of her infant daughter 
Charlotte Josephine JPoiercll, ’ 
who died on the 25th Feb. 1840, aged 3 years 
9 months and 24 days. 


172 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


In Memory of Maria E. K. Howard, 

daughter of Robert and Maria Howard, who 
died 17th May 1840, aged 24 years. 


And of her nephew James Perkins Sturgis, 

son of Henry P. and Mary G. Sturgis, 
who died 8tli Sept. 1840, aged 11 months. 

In years they differed, in purity and 
innocence they were alike. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


The infant son of Captain P. M. Hay. 
28th Regiment Native Infantry, died the 30th 
of June 1820, aged 9 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mary Ellen Money, 
died 24th Sept. 1846, aged 5 days. 


To the Memory of Mary Agnes, daughter of 
D. Carmichael Smyth and Anne his wife, 
born 27th Nov. 1827, died 21st Nov. 1829. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Mary Sherwood, 
wife of Lieut. -Col. J. D. Sherwood, 
who departed this life on the 
22d of August 1819, aged 49 years. 

An affectionate wife, a tender mother and 
a sincere friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Helen Mackenzie Moore, infant daughter of 
John and Anne Isabella Moore, 
born 26th August, died 19th Sept. 1825. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 

Death came with friendly care, 

The infant bud to heaven convey’d, 

And bade it blossom there. 

Also to the Memory of Master C. J. C. Moore, 
died 29th March 1833, aged 10 mos. and 7 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Jackman, 
who departed this life on the 
11th December 1830, aged 59 years. 


And in Memory of 

Amelia Rhoda Ann Sheills, born 20th Sept. 
1828, died 10th May 1832. 


Also to the Memory of Mr. Edward Sheills, 
late an Asst, in the Surveying Department, 
Obit. 20th April 1837, aged 29 years. 


In Memory of Miss Catherine Cooney, 

died 12th June 1837, aged 27 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Hannah Preston, 
who departed this life on the 19th Nov. 1836, 
beloved and lamented, aged 20 years. 

“ In the midst of life we are in death.” 


To the Memory of Mr. Philip Hunt, 
who died at sea on board the “ Prince of Orange,” 
on the 4th of Jany. 1817, aged 52 years. 

My times of sorrow and of joy, 

Great God are in thy hand ; 

My choicest comforts came from thee, 

And go at thy command. 

Th is feeble tribute of affection is inscribed to his 
memory by his disconsolate widow, Ann Hunt. 


Sacred lo the Memory of Mr. Joseph Roscoe, 
died on the 1 9th of Aug. 1837, aged 43 years. 
” Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Sami. Smith, 
who departed this life on the 1st of May 1826, 
aged 58 years. 


To the Memory of Julia Best Goodall. 
died 29th June 1823, aged 1 year and 7 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Valentine Kimmins, who departed this life 
at Calcutta, on the 29th April 1836, aged 27 yrs. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Joseph Boezalt, 
who died on the 10th Nov. 1825, aged 24 years, 
9 months and 26 days. 

This tomb is erected to his memory by his family. 


To the Memory of the late "Wm. Boezalt, 
the grandson of Mrs. E. Bruce, died on the 1st of 
June 1833, aged 1 year, 7 months and 16 days. 


Henry John, the son of Francis and Anne Palmer, 
born the 23rd June 1836, died the 23rd Feb. 1837, 
AStat 8 months. 

Also Fanny Anna, daughter of the above, 
born 27th August 1843, died 10th June 1847, 
aged 3 years, 9 months and 13 days. 

Also "William Burrows Palmer, their son, 
born 19th June 1839, died 20tli July 1847, 
aged 6 years and 1 month. 


Nicholas Paliologus. 

Sacred to the Memory of John Huges, Senior, 
who departed this life on the 27th March 1830, 
aged 44 years. 

Thos. Bowen, Obit. 28th March 1836, Altai 38. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. Edward Jones, 
son of the late D. Jones, Esq. who departed this 
life on the 9th June A. D. 1833, aged 24 yrs. 

11 months and 13 days. 

This Memorial is erected as a tribute of affection 
by his disconsolate mother. 

Softly his fainting head he lay upon his 
Maker’s breast. 


Sacred to the Memory of Helen, 
wife of Lieut. J. Barclay, of the 4th Bengal Light 
Cavalry, who died at Calcutta on the 10th 
March 1828, aged 22 years. 

This Monument is erected by her husband as a 
record of their devoted attachment and a 
token of affectionate remembrance of that exem- 
plary worth which endeared her to all her 
relations and friends. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Tredway Clarke, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Service, eldest son of Major 
Genl. Tredway Clarke, of the Madras Artillery, 
who departed this life on the 13th Sept. 1823, 
aged 25 years, 4 months and 20 days. 

A man eminently conspicuous for the integrity o 
his principles, the soundness of his heart, 

, and the propriety of his conduct as a husband, 
father and a friend. Most sincerely lamented 
by bis relatives and numerous friends. Also 
Tr edway Sydenham, his infant son, 
Obit. 20th November 1823, ALtat 9 months 
and 20 days. 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


173 



Sacred to the Memory of John Angus, Esq. 

2d Commissioner Court of Requests, who died at 
Calcutta on the 6th day of July 1822, in the 
44th year of his age. 


In Memory of Mrs. Anne Milder, 
the beloved wife of Mr. Edward Hilder of Cal- 
cutta, born 25th Feb. 1826, died 7th Sept. 1839. 
i On the same day her infant 'William Menry, 
aged 6 hours. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Daniel Murray, Esq. Merchant, 
who departed this life on the 30th August 1840, 
aged 65 years, 1 month, 15 days. 

Go home my friends and cease your tears, 

I must lie here till Christ appears, 

Repent in time, while time you have, 

There’s no repentance in the grave. 

This Monument is erected by his afflicted wife, 
Mrs. Sally Murray. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
the relict of the late 1). Murray, Esq. 
who died on the 16th Oct. 1845, aged 61 years. 

“ Here the wicked cease from troubling and 
the weary are at rest.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Maria Floyd, 

who died 22d April 1842, JEt. 23 years, 
11 months, 23 days. 


Mrs. E. Grose, died 7th April 1843, 
aged 45 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of 'William Allen, Esq. 

formerly of the H. C. Maritime Service 
and late Inspector of Customs at this port, who 
departed this life on the 27th September 1839, 
in the 49th year of his age. 


In Memory of Charlotte Grace, 

daughter of Geo. Wm. and Maria Scott, 
who died 5th March 1840, aged 9 ms. and 8 days. 

“ When Christ who is my life shall appear, then 
shall I also appear with him in glory.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sophia Matilda Pereira, 

Born 27th Sept. 1822, died 16th Dec. 1842. 

In life beloved and in death lamented. This slab 
is dedicated to her Memory by her friends. 

Sacred to the Memory of Edmund Johnson, 
late Indigo Planter, died 31st October 1831, 
aged 44 years, 5 months and 28 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Miss Oceana M. Blake, 
who was removed to a better world, 
having lived and served God in this ; 
October 6th, A. D. 1839, aged 21 years, 

11 months and 27 days. 

“ Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Horton, 
who departed this life on the 9th April 1840, 
aged 37 years and 3 months. 

“ Blessed are those who die in the Lord.” 


Also sacred to the Memory of 
My beloved son-io-law, 'W. N. Dodd, 
who departed this life on the 29th August 1840, 
aged 26 years and 7 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. James Aiery Horton, 
who departed this life on the 15th May 1846, 
aged 27 years, 4 months and 5 days. 

Never was dust to dust more sadly said, 

Then when thy spotless relics were laid ; 

’Tis vain the efforts to describe thy worth, 

Tears, the sole eloquence of grief, spring forth , 
For ever lost to those who knew thee not, 

By those who knew 7 thee never to be forgot. 

To the Memory of Jane Henrietta Turner, 

Died 6th March 1846, aged 1 year and 7 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mr. George Graham, 
who died 27th February 1837, aged 34 years, 
This stone is placed by his friend, J. Street. 

In Memory of William Connor Walker, 

Midshipman of the Ship “ Owen Glendower,” 
who was unfortunately drowned 22nd Nov. 1840, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry Thomas Palmer, 
son of Henry and Elvira Palmer, died May the 
30th, 1841, aged 8 months and 10 days. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me and for- 
bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God.” 
Also in Memory of his grandmother, 

Mrs. Charlotte Champenois, 
died 21st January 1842, aged 47 years. 


In Memory of Mr. G. Higgins’ two children. 


In Memory of Ann Humphreyes, 

died 26th February 1838, aged 90 years. 
This is erected as a tribute of respect by the 
Legatees of the deceased. 

In Memory of Mr. J. R. Clermont, 
who died 15th November 1846, aged 29 years, 
1 month and 16 days. 

Erected by liis affectionate widow. 


Ci Git. 

Thomas Justin, 

Ne le 8 Juni 1841, decede le meme Jour 
et Jean— Louis Marie Ne le 7 Decembre 1839, 
decede le 10 Juni 1842 les deux enfants de 
Justin Benoit et Marie Boudet. 


L. M. M. April 23rd, 1840. 
The Memento of an infant son, 
Feb. 1836 ; March 18 39. 


In Memory of Miss Madaline Catania, 
who died 7th June 1840, aged 6 years 7 months 
and 11 days. 

Also Miss Catherine Catania, who died 30th 
March 1841, aged 9 years, 4 months and 4 days. 

Mr. N. Davies, died 29th July 1836, 
aged 36 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Francis Gladwin Baillie 
who died 5th July 1840, aged 46 years! 8 months 
and 10 days. 


174 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of Robert B, Harris, 
who departed this life on the 12th Sept. 1840, 
aged 26 years. 

Also to his infant. Catherine Amelia, 
who died on the 18th June 1840, aged 2 months. 

In Memory of William Jackson, 
Boatswain H. M. S. “ Conway,” died 22nd 
February 1840, aged 33 years and 4 months. 
Also Thomas Lawrence, aged 30. 

And John Whitelock, aged 32, 
seamen of the above ship, who died 4th and 
5th February 1840. 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane Spilsbury, 
the wife of Wale Byrne, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 15th April 1844, 
aged 29 years, 5 months and 23 days. 

“ A woman that feareth the Lord she shall be 
praised.” 


Sacred to the Memory of “Walter, 
infant son of H. S. Lane, Esq. of the Civil 
Service, who died 30th October 1832, 
aged 2 months and 13 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Michael Moran, 

2nd son of the late Mr. Patrick Moran of 
Berhampore, died 10th May 1844, aged 22 years, 
4 months and 9 days. 

It pleased the Almighty to take away this affec- 
tionate son and brother, in the morning of his 
days ! A mother, two brothers, and four sisters 
dear, lament his early death ! ! Also a large cir- 
cle of relatives and friends. 

Father, thy gracious hand we own, 

And bow submissive to thy rod, 

That must be wise which thou hast done, 

It must be kind, for Thou art God. 


Here lie the remains of Mary Halliday Byrne, 
born 20th April 1830, died 28th April 1831. 
Slowly we wander o’er a toilsome way, 

Shadows of life and pilgrims of a day. 

Sacred to the Memory of Janet, 
the wife of Mr. Wale Byrne, 
who departed this life on the 23rd June 1837, 
aged 27 years, 6 months and 6 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
■William Jackson, Esq. 

Attorney at Law in this city, who died in Calcutta 
November 15th, 1838, aged 36 years. 


In Memory of Mary Letitia, 

the first child of George and Evelina V. Hill, 
born on the 17th March 1828, and died on the 
8th August following, aged 4 months and 21 days. 
In this grave are also deposited the remains of 
the above named Mrs. Evelina V. Hill, 
who was born 31st December 1805, and died 
at Ballygunge in the suburbs of Calcutta, 
on the 11th January 1844, 
six days after giving birth (5th of the same 
month) to her eleventh child (a boy) who was 
still-born ; leaving her husband in Calcutta 
and six children in England, 
surviving her, “ who call her blessed ;” 
as also of her following children : 
Theodosia Evelina, 

born 30th October 1831, died 1st June 1834. 

John Alexander, 

born 29th June 1835, died 12th December 1839, 
and a still-born female child 26th November 1841. 


To mark the spot where lie interred the 
remains of Mr. Alexander Macqueen, 
who departed this life 13th April 1840, aged 36. 
This tablet is erected by his friends and 
Office-mates. 


R. H. Bain, M. D. died the 19th August 1839, 
aged 33 years and 3 months. 


Here are deposited in an humble hope of joyful 
insurrection through the merits of their Redeemer, 
the remains of Mary Anne Foxhill, 

Obit. 16th December 1820, aged 15 years. 
And of Georgiana Kerr, 
daughter of Robert and Margaret Kerr, born 
29th August 1817, Obit. 15th December 1838, 

“ The Lordknowetli them that are his.” — Tim. 
ii. v. 19. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Ellison, 
died 2nd August 1839, aged 32 years, 8 months 
and 11 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Diana Rochfort D’Oyly, 

the only daughter of the late 
John Hadley D’Oyly, C. S. aged 18 years, 
died on the 4th of January 1840. 

“ It is the Lord, let Him do what seemeth Him 
good.” — 1 Samuel, 3. 18. 


Sacred to the Memory of Barbara, 
third daughter of W. Molloy, Esq. of Rockvalley, 
county Tipperary, Ireland, who died at 
Calcutta, Dec. 17th, 1829, aged 16 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Richard Howe Cockerell, R. N. 

who departed this life on the 7th August 1839, 
aged 40 years and 8 months. 

He was beloved and respected by all who knew 
him, arid his loss is irreparable to her, who 
offers this tribute to his memory. 

Had his life been spared, he would have returned 
to Europe in the early part of the year 1840. 








Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Caroline, 
beloved daughter of Mrs. 1. Wells, 
who died 12th May 1836, aged 2 years, 

11 months and 21 days. 

“The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away> 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Georgiana Arabella, 
infant daughter of II. S. Lane, Esq. of the 
Civil Service, and Georgiana his wife, who died 
23rd July 1846, aged 11 months and 12 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

George Scott Hills, 

who died on the 12th of Dec. 1839, aged 30 yrs. 0 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. Jeremiah “Wright, 
died 30th May 1843, aged 40 years, 4 months 
and 24 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of Francis Purchase, 
and his family. 


da 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


1/5 


Here are deposited tlie revered remains of 

John Statham, 

Master Pilot, H. C. S. a well-known, active and 
zealous officer, born 24th October 1808, 
died 18th September 1811. 

He was universally esteemed for his integrity, 
kindness of disposition and willing to oblige, 
and died deeply and deservedly regretted by his 
relatives, friends and acquaintances, but 
above all by his much afflicted widow, 
who mourns the loss of such an 
incomparable husband. 

Thou art gone to the grave, ’twere wrong to de- 
plore thee, 

Since God was thy ransom, thy guardian, thy 
guide, 

He gave thee, He took thee, He soon will restore 
thee, 

Where death has no sting, since the Saviour has 
died. 

Also his two infant children, who died in early 
infancy. 

Affections last token, 

Also of Mary Anne Statham, 
widow of Mr. John Statham, died 12th Nov. 1842, 
aged 40 years, 5 months and 1 1 days. 


To the Memory of 
George Thomas DeAuguilar, 

Lieutenant-Colonel in the Service of the Hon’ble 
East India Company, died 9th Oct. 1839, 
aged 60 years. 


Antoinette Elisa, 

epouse de Louis Adolphe Richy, nee a Port Louis 
lie de France, le 4 Juillet 1816, decedee a 
Calcutta le 24th Novembre 1839. 


Antoinette Louise, 

epouse de Charles Morel, mere de Antoinette 
Elisa Richy, nee a port Louis, lie de France, 
le 4 Fevrier 1797, decedee a Calcutta le 
24 Mars 1840. 


To Francis Bathie, (of this city,) 
died 9th March 1840, aged 49 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mr. "William Darling, 

who departed this life 7th March 1840, aged 46. 
Requiescat in pace. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Adolphus Muller, Esq. 
of Frankfort, O. M. Merchant, died 10th 
Nov. 1840, aged 58 years. 

Also William Blackall Muller, 
infant son of Adolphus and Mary Muller, 
died 23d February 1835. 


Sacred to the memory of 

Louisa Margaret, 

the beloved wife of Henry Brownlow, Esq. C. S. 
who departed this life on the 28th of Feb. 1840, 
aged 21 years and 6 months. 

“ It is the Lord, let Him do what seemeth Him 

good.” 


II. G. Coles, 

died 22d Jan. 1834, aged 1 yr. 1 month 21 days. 

T. C. C. Howe, 

died 18th Nov. 1842, aged 9 months 9 days. 


£acred to the Memory of H. G. A. Howe, Jr. 
died 15th May 1838, aged 50 years, 

8 months 26 days. 

The dirge is sung, death’s tribute paid. 

Why mourn ye living for the dead ; 
Salvation’s cross secures his bliss, 

May thus he rest in endless peace. 

A brother’s tribute. 


To the Memory of Jessy, 
wife of Charles Monins Hollingberry, died 7th 
May 1835, aged 39 years, 9 months and 23 days. 
Also of Charles Monins Hollingberry, 
died 20th August 1845, aged 69 years, 

1 1 months and 23 days. 

This Monument is erected by their bereaved 
children. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Janthe Alleen Bowes Lyon Dunbar, 

daughter of J. Dunbar, Esq. of the Civil Service, 
died Feb. 11th, 1840, aged 1 year and 2 months. 
“Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Sarah Thompson, 
who departed this life on the 2d April 1847, 
aged 46 years, 9 months and 16 days. 

“ I wait for the Lord ; my soul doth wait ; and 
in his word do I hope.” — Psalm cxxxv. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Lieut. Joseph Charles Sage, 

who departed this life on the 23d of Oct. 1839, 
aged 36 years and 6 months. 
Affection’s last token. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Major "William McQuhae, 
of the Bengal Artillery, who died in Calcutta 
23d October 1824, aged 38 years. 

He was cut off in the prime of life and in the 
fullness of earthly hope, far from his native 
soil, where he had fondly hoped to have 
ended his days. In every relation of life he was 
estimable ; by his courage, his zeal and his 
humanity he dignified the profession of a soldier ; 

and by his generosity of heart, sweetness of 
temper and honorable principle endeared himself 
to a numerous circle of friends. He lived 
beloved and esteemed and died lamented and 
mourned by his afflicted widow and orphans, who 
erected this as a small memorial of 
their lovely affection. 


R. T. Longher, of Pylem, 
Glamorghanshire, South Wales, 
Obit. August 31st, 1800, zEtat 29. 


Sacred to the Memory of Evelina Jane, 
the faithful and beloved wife of James Lamb, 
who departed this life 18th Jan. 1845. 
aged 46 years and 2 months. 

John Lamb, died 10th May 1820, aged 28 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Stephen Read, 
Branch Pilot H. C. B. M. 
departed this life on the 7th September 1845, 
aged 48 years, 4 months and 18 days. 
Reader ! reflect and copy if you can. 

The social virtues of this worthy man. 

This Monument is erected by his disconso- 
late widow. 


170 


SOUTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of Elizabeth Mullins, 

the affectionate and beloved wife of 
C. W. Mullins, Esq. born March 22nd 1817, 
who departed this life January 9th 1843. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Rivers Thomas Howe, died 1st April 1847, 
aged 31 years, 4 months, 20 days. 

And Hugh Torrington Howe, 
died 30th Jan. 1845, aged 27 yrs. 4 mos. 28 dys. 
The mourning throng in sad array 
Muse o’er the grave of those laid low; 

Whilst angels chaunt their solemn lay, 
Affection’s tears in sadness flow. 

Yes ! tears shall flow, the loss be felt, 

Whilst mem’ry holds in sad relief 
My two lov’d sons — oh ! thus bereft, 

What can assuage a father’s grief. 


Sacred to the Memory of Edward Harris, 
who died on the 21st Feb. 1841, aged 62 years. 

Thou art gone to the grave, but ’twere wrong to 
deplore thee, 

Since God was thy ransom, thy guardian, thy 
guide ; 

He gave thee, He took thee, He soon will restore 
thee, 

Where death has no sting, since the Saviour has 
died. 

Erected by his affectionate widow and only 
daughter. 


In Memory of Mary Anne Clarke, 

who died 2d March 1840, aged 26 yrs. and 4 mos. 
Savred to the Memory of Thomas Clarke, Esq. 
late Senior Branch Pilot H. C. Marine, 

Obit. 31st July 1839, aged 52 years. 

As the head of the service to which he belonged, 
he showed to the junior branches of it, a steady 
example of integrity, diligence and attachment 
to its duties, but above all this he was a believer in 
the Lord Jesus Christ, and exemplified his faith 
by works of piety and active benevolence. 
Reader ! follow the footsteps of the upright. 

In Memory of Eliza Margaret, 

daughter of J. B. Breen, and his wife 
Frances Anne, who departed this life on the 
1st June 1839, aged 4 years, 9 months and 7 days. 


VS/illiam Kerr Ewart, Esq. 
born 7th Dec. 1804, died 15th May 1839. 

Here rest the remains of Mary, 
the exemplary wife of Mr. T. Ross of the 
Pilot Service, who finished her earthly career on 
Good Friday, the 17th April, 1840, 
aged 27 years, 11 months and 14 days. 

She was a faithful and affectionate wife, a fond 
and devoted mother, and has left the memorial of 
her virtues deeply engraven on the hearts 
of all by whom she was known. 

“ God will redeem my soul from the power of 
the grave, for he shall receive me.” 

Also Mary Frances, the beloved child of 
Mr. and Mrs. T. Ross, who departed this life 
June 24th, 1839, aged 1 yr. 8 mos. and 14 days. 
“ Of such is the kingdom of heaven.” 


To the Memory of Charles Townsend, 

the beloved son of Thomas and Louisa Ross, 
born 22d March 1846, died 31st Aug. 1847. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Louisa Robs, 
the beloved wife of Mr. T. Ross, H. C. M. 
and grand -daughter of the Rev. John Townsend, 
Founder of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 
whose dissolution took place on the 20th June 
1845, aged 31 years, 11 months and 26 days. 
Her amiable qualities were known to few 
in India, having been but a few months 
in Calcutta, but by her afflicted husband, relations 
and an extensive circle of dear friends 
her loss will be greatly deplored. 


In Memory of Charlotte Jane, 

infant daughter of Frederick James Halliday, 
born 4th May 1838, died 22d March 1839. 

“ Of such is the kingdom of God.” 

In Memory of Fanny Emily, 
the beloved daughter of Major-General 
J. A. Paul MacGregor, and Jane his wife, 
w'ho departed this life on the 
9th May 1839, aged 19 years. 

“ The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Rose Wren, 
who departed this life on the 8th Dec. 1829, 
aged 75 years. 

Also Mrs. Elizabeth Lamb, who died on the 
19th June 1844, aged 69 years. 

“ Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Charles, 
the infant son of H. C. Lefever and Ann 
Georgiana his wife, who died on the 23d Oct. 
1847, aged 8 months and 9 days. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
William Godfrey Smith, 

died 19th July 1839, aged 38 yrs. and 3 mos. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, 

the beloved wife of Mr. S. Peterson, w r ho died 
on the 14th Nov. 1838, aged 42 years. 

Reader, pause and reflect for awhile. 

This is a sure place to rest from toil ; 

With sickness I was sore opprest, 

Kind death has eased me, I lie here at rest. 


Sacred to the Memory of a beloved husband, 
Henry James Chippindall, Esq. 
of the Bengal Civil Service, who departed this life j 
on the 7th July 1839, aged 50 years. 
Jehovah, Tsidkenu, w'as all things to him. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Henry 'William Mitchell, who departed 
this life 26th July 1839, aged 30 years, 5 months 
and 10 days. 

A name that will ever be near and dear to the 
heart of a disconsolate widow who erects this frail; 
Monument as a record of much departed worth, i 
as well as a mark of her own esteem for an 
affectionate husband and a sincere friend, whose j 
suffering in this life, tho’ manifold and great, 
were met with examplary Christian fortitude, j 
“ Behold God is my salvation ; I will trust, and 
not be afraid, for the Lord Jehovah is my strength 
and my song ; he also is become my salvation.” — 
Isaiah xii. v. 2. 


J. J. Llewellyn, Obit. 12th Dec. 1844, 
aged 29 years. 








*i 

?! 


n 

■C 




ih 




e 


id 


nil 


H 






177 


THE NORTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Hugh Gayer Honycornb, Esq. 
died 22nd April 1791, aged 37 years, 1 month 
and 22 days. 

How lov’d, how valu’d once avails thee not, 
To whom related or by whom begot ; 

An heap of dust alone remains of thee, 

’Tis all thou art and all the proud shall be. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Eleonora Honycornb, 

-who departed this life 6th September 1801, A. D. 
aged 33 years, 3 months and 6 days. 

“ Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death 
of his saints.” — Psalm 116. v. 15. 


To the Memory of Thomas Lee, 
who was born at Lancaster, and died on his 
passage from hence to England, on the 14 th day 
of March 1797, aged 38 years. 

This Monument is erected by his afflicted widow. 

1 o the Memory of the late Bernard Hard, 
aged 60 years, who died the 4th of Dec. 1798. 
Erected by his beloved daughter, 

Maria Stacchiney. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Nathaniel Bacon, who was born at 
Ipswich, in Suffolk, on the 25th of Sept. 1734. 
He departed this life on the 29th of Jan. 1799, 
aged 64 years, 4 months and 4 days, 
sincerely regretted by all who had the pleasure of 
knowing him. 

In Memory of Charles Coates, Esq. 
who departed this life the 10th of May 1799, 
aged 36 years. 

In Memory of Mrs. L. ’WToodhouse, 
the wife of Mr. Thos. Woodhouse, in the H. C. 
P. Service, who departed this life Anno Domini 
1799, aged 19 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Robert Matthew, 
late a Master in the H. C.’s Marine, who 
departed this life on the 30th of May 1799, 
aged 33 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Joseph Ferguson, 

:ate of H. M. 78th or Rosshire Regiment of Foot, 
Ob. 27th November 1799, 2Et 25 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Jane Benbow, 
died the 17th of January 1800, aged 8 years, 
4 months and 2 days. 

Peculiar blessings bear the shortest date, 
And wond’rous births early resign to fate, 
They're made by nature of superior mould. 
Of too refin'd a substance to grow old. 


Sacred to the Memory of William Charles, 
son of William and Maria Faithful, 

^’ho departed this life the 19th of October 1800, 
aged 4 years and 5 months. 


Here lies the body of 
Mr. John Charles Bartholomae, 

a ho died on 20th October 1800, aged 59 years. 


Memoriae Sacrum Roaettae Ford, 

Quae obiit die Augusti 22me. A. D. 1800. 
iEtatis suae 37. 

Sacred to virtue in a well spent life, 

Of gentle, unassuming merit shewn, 

In pious memory of a much lov’d wife, 

Her sorrowing husband rears this votive stone 
By each domestic social charm endear’d, 

As wife, as mother, and as friend ador’d ; 

By all the good lamented and rever’d, 

Through faith in Christ here rests Rosetta Ford. 

To the Memory of Thomas Henry Graham, 

son of Thomas Graham, Esq. 

(late a Member of the Supreme Council in Bengal) 
who fell gloriously in an action between the 
Honorable East India Company’s Ship “ Kent,” 
and a French privateer in the mouth of the 
Ganges, on the 7th of October 1800, the day on 
which he completed the sixteenth year of his age. 

Tho’ his terrestrial career was thus short it 
displayed a great and varied excellence, endowed 
with superior talents he cultivated them, with 
unwearied industry and amiable success ; and to 
these literary acquirements which commanded 
respect he added the amiable manners which 
secured the friendship of his associates. The 
premature close of a life so full of promises was 
honored by sincere and general sorrows, and 
his afflicted parent, to whom after a long separa- 
tion he was about to be restored with all the 
accomplishments of a liberal education, and under 
whose eye he was about to commence his 
duties as a Civil Servant on the Honorable 
Company’s Bengal Establishment, hath erected 
this Memorial to perpetuate the remembrance of a 
son so deservedly the object of his affection 
and regret. 


J. W. F. Lumsdeu, 

infant son of John Lumsden, born 19th 
Oct, 1800, died 27th July 1801, aged 9 months 
and 10 days. 


Francis Howard Betts, 

died the 31st of July 1801, aged 12 months 
and 15 days. 


In Memory of 
Captain John Cristall, 

of the “ Nutwell who was unfortunately 
drowned on the 15th day of Aug. 1801, 
aged 38 years. 


“ Memento Mori.” Here lies the body of 
Captain Ambrose BLepling, 
who departed this life September 22d, 1801, 
aged 60 years and 8 months. 

One of the oldest Commanders out of this port, 
a man much respected in his lifetime, and 
now sincerely lamented. 

In deep distress with sorrows round, 

Assist me, or my barks aground ; 

From rocks and shoals and dangers of tire deep 
God has preserved my soul I hope as vet. 


To the Memory of Capt. John Hagjrev 
who died the 10th October 1801, aged 62 years. 


178 


NORTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Maria Jane Farrell, 
who died 26th Sept. 1801, aged 34 years. 
Adieu, Maria, once amiable and accomplished 
woman, the powers of panegyric are weak 
and vain ; thy merits are best recorded in the 
bosoms of thy friends and of him who 
must ever bewail thy loss, yet even the passing 
stranger may find an interest in knowing 
what has been taught by thy example, that at the 
close of a life of piety and virtue death is less 
to be dreaded as an evil than coveted as a blissful 
transition to a happier state of existence. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Capt. Isaac Humphreys, 
who died on the 27th day of October 1801, 
deeply and deservedly lamented by all who knew 
him, as a pious and charitable Christian, a brave 
soldier, a warm and generous friend. — iEt. 49. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Anna Chilves, 
who departed this life May 18th, 1802, 
aged 38 years. 

Long time with sickness I was sore oppress’d, 
Kind death has eas’d me, I lie here at rest. 


Tn Memory of Agnes Jane Scott, 

School Mistress, who departed this life 
May the 29th, 1802, aged 31 years. 

She was a virtuous woman, a loving wife and an j 
excellent mother. 


To the Memory of 
Mrs. Charlotte Sandys, 

who died on the 22d of July 1802, aged 25 years. 

“ I know that my Redeemer liveth.” 

To me, by the Divine mercy, death hath lost its 
sting ; I welcome its arrival in the sure and certain 
hope of present joy and felicity. Such were her 
own words on the day of her death ; whosoever 
thus believeth shall never die. Her children, 
Wm. Digby Sandys, Allan Sandys and Charlotte 
Sandys, shall call her blessed, and her husband, 
(hereby) praiseth her, for she w'as a wdfe from the 
Lord. Her record is on high. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Elias Fergusson, Esq. 
who died on the 20th July 1802, aged 27 years. 
Whose talents, virtues, and generous dispositions, 
(had it pleased God to prolong his life,) 
promised extensive utility. This unavailing but 
sincere tribute of esteem and affection is 
inscribed by his brother, 

John Hutcheson Fergus son. 

No funeral wreaths thy simple grave adorn, 

But thy departure truth and friendship mourn ; 
Short as unequal is life’s passage o’er, 

Though sever’d now', w r e soon shall part no more. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Johnson, 
wife of Captain J. Martin Johnson, 
who died July 24th, 1802. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Jane Lathrop, 
who died on the 15th of August 1802, 
aged 18 years. 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. M. Templeton, 
w ife of Mr. Thos. Templeton, 
who departed this life on the 28th August 1802, 
aged 28 years. 

This Monument is erected by her afflicted hus- 
band in commemoration of her virtues as an 
affectionate wdfe, a tender mother and a taithtul 
friend, during an union of 14 years. 

Sacred to the Memory ol Elizabeth, 
wife of Edward Golding, who departed 
this life on Sunday 19th September 1802, 
aged 18 years and 11 months. 

In .Memory of Mrs. E. Jones, 
who departed this life 5th Oct. 1802, aged 28. 
Also her daughter Mary, 
aged 2 years, 8 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of Philip Huet, 
who departed this life on the 12th Oct. 1802, 
aged 28 years, 2 months and 7 days. 
Reader, below to native dust consign’d, 

A tender husband and a parent kind ; 

A generous friend, whose words by deeds 
prov’d, 

In death lamented, as in life belov’d, 
Unconscious sleeps ! If worth deserve a tear. 
Stop, and the pious tribute render here. 


is were 


In Memory of Dr. John Peter Wade, 
Obit. 14th Oet. 1802, ./Elat 40. 


To the Memory of Colonel Samuel Dyer, 
Quarter Master General on this Establishment, 
who departed this life on the 
13th December 1802, aged 32. 


In Memory of Mr. Cornelius Cooper, 

many years an inhabitant of Calcutta, who 
departed this life on the 11th of April 1803, 
aged 59 years and 1 1 months. 

Also of Mrs. Mary Dunn, only 
daughter of the late Cornelius Cooper, 
who departed this life on the 1st of Jan. 1804, 
aged 22 years and 7 months. 


To the Memory of Mrs. A. Frushard, 
here interred ; born at Hackney, died at 
Calcutta, 23d April 1803. 

Wife of James Frushard, Esq. of this Presidency 
daughter of Thomas Jones, Esq. Head of 
the Receiver General’s Office of the 
Custom House, London, and Mary his wife, 
whose loyal and virtuous conduct she 
faithfully copied during her whole life. She 
rendered herself universally respected 
and beloved hv her pre-eminent benevolence of 
character, and by the most unfeigned delight 
in the constant exercise of pious affections, 
for she loved her God, and was 
desirous of living to his glory in humble 
hope that her endeavours to practise holiness 
would be accepted by Him through the 
alone merits of her Redeemer. 

“ Blessed are the merciful for they shall ohtaii 
mercy.” — Matt. v. 7. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master ^William Richardson, 
who departed this life September 8th, 1802. 
aged 15 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of James Coombes, 
late a Master on the Pilot Establishment, 
who departed this life on the 6th July 1803, 
-Et. 37 years and 4 months. 


a 

HI 


NORTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


179 



Erected to the Memory of Mr. John Newman, 
who departed this life the 18th June 1803, 
aged 65 years. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Sarah Aungier, 
who departed this life July 2d, 1803, 
aged 22 years and 6 months. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

William Patrick Cooke Bradshaw, 

died 21st July 1803, aged 32 years. 

When living beloved in all relations true, 
Exposed to follies, but subdued by few ; 
Reader, reflect, and copy if you can, 

The social virtues of this worthy man. 

Sacred to the Memory of Lieut. James Reddy, 
Royal Navy, who departed this life 
2d Aug. 1803, TEtat 47 years. 

Richard Fuennes Procter, 

^son of G. Jas. Procter, Esq. Surgeon H. M. 22nd 
Regt. Inf. and of Elizabeth Anne his wife. 
:Born January 25th, 1802, died August 31st 1803. 

•Sacred to the Memory of Martha Jane Adams, 
who departed this life on the 28th Sept. 1807, 
aged 3 years, 10 months and 14 days. 

; Sleep soft in death, and wait the Almighty’s will, 
Then rise unchanged and be an Angel still. 

To the Memory of Captain George Roraaine, 
who departed this life on the 3rd Oct. 1803, 
aged 56 years. 


A lonely wretched father lost to all earthly joy, 
'erects this Monument to the mourned Memory of 
his first and favorite child, Maria Bathurst. 
Born on the 5th of Aug. 1786, died the 28th of 
"Dec. 1803, aged 17 years, 4 months and 23 days. 

Ah me, of faith and piety to God, of love 
*and gratitude to her parents, of friendship, charity 
good will to all ; how sweet a blossom, how 
untimely nipt in health, the gay, the careless, the 
supremely happy in sickness ; the mild, the pen- 
sive; she patiently resign’d through every vicissi- 
tude of pleasure and of pain ; engagingly and 
interestingly attractive, her smiles blended cheer- 
fulness with sensibility, her manners elegant 
and graceful, accorded with the purity and eleva- 
tion of her mind. 

You who from sympathy or sorrow, 

Shall roam these mansions of the sainted dead, 
Pause to lament Maria’s early bier, 

With patient grief that loves the lingering tear 
Forgive you must to virtues of a friend, 

And weep if pity has a tear to lend. 

Then yonder thus ere nature sunk to rest, 
When her departing breath her joy express’d, 
When her last look, ere thought and feeling 
fled, 

A mingled gleam of hope and triumph shed. 
What to her soul its glad assurance gave ; 

Its hope in death, its triumph o’er the grave ; 
The £weet remembrance of each spotless day, 
Hush’d all her doubts and shew’d to heaven 
the way ; 

This truth confess’d, pray humbly at his shrin e 
That her eternal raptures may be thine. 


To the Memory of" 

Master John Benson, who died 27th Sept, 1804‘ 
aged 3 years and 4 months. 


In the joyful hope of resurrection, 

Here lieth the body of Edward Shouldharn, 
who was born at Dublin on the 12th Feb. 1745, O.S. 

and departed this life on the 18th April 
1804, N. S. aged 59 years, 2 months and 18 days. 
His character throughout life was marked with 
the strictest integrity and unaffected humanity 
and benevolence ; he was an affectionate parent 
and husband and a sincere friend. 


Sacred to the Memory of the late 
Mary Ann Grueber Sealy, wife of 
John Nathl. Sealy, who departed this life on the 
26th Sept. 1804, in the 28th year of her age. 


To the Memory of Mrs. Mary Lewis, 
who departed this life Oct. 24th, 1804, aged 30 yrs. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Serjeant Robert HCabberly, 
late of the Town Guard, who departed' this life 
the5thNov. 1804, aged37 yrs. 9mos. and 26 dys, 
leaving a widow and three children to lament 
his death. 

Long time with sickness, 1 was sore oppress’d, 
Kind death has eas’d me, I lay here at rest. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
George Augustus Chick, ely Plowden, 

: of the Civil Service on the Bengal Establishment, 
who departed this life Friday the 16th Nov. 
in the year of our Lord 1804, aged 18 years. 

“ We brought nothing into this world and it is 
certain we can carry nothing out. 
i The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, 
blessed be the name of the Lord.” 


Sacred to the Memory of Mrs. Ann Barnfield, 
Obit. 2nd Dec. 1804, yEtat 29 years. 

Know ye, who to this mournful shrine draw near, 
Here lies the wife belov’d, the mother dear ; 

Here rests a woman good without pretence, 

Blest with plain reason, and with solid sense : 

Her unaffected and composed mind, 

M as meek, was humble, patient and resigned. 

“ Blessed are the poor in spirit ; blessed are 
the meek.” — Matthew, chap. 5. v. 3. 


Elizabeth Dunbar Robertson, 

the daughter of Roderick and Anna Robertson, 
horn the 31st July 1804, died the 23d March 1806. 

“ Suffer little children to come unto me and 
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of 
God.” 


Hie Sepullus Jacet Hippolitus Foignand, 
Natus die 29th Augusti Anno Domini 1761, 
Obit, die 19th Maii 1805. 

Ad lenitatem quam erga uxorem, 

Ad amorem quem erga liberos, 

Ad liberalitatem quam erga socios, 

Ad urbanitatem quam erga omnes, 
llle habuit, nihil potest accedere. 

Hoc marvor uxore multum moerens, 
Fosuit die Junii 9 Anno Domini 1805. 


To the Memory of St. John Moore, Esq. 
who departed this life. Sept. 2nd, 1805, aged 19 yrs. 

Sacred to the Memory of 
Captain Henry Knight ESrskine, 

| 53d Regt, of Foot, who died on the 3rd Sept. 1805, 


180 


NORTH PARK STREET BURIAL GROUND. 


To the Memory of 
Captain William Parramore, 

this Monument is erected by his faithful friends. 
Alas, poor Parry, the rewards are come, 

For heaven best knows the deeds thou’st done ; 
Feeling thy loss, we thus our tribute pay, 

Oh, sad remembrance of thy parting day ; 

Yet, all cheering thought, thou’rt blest above, 
Tho’ on earth bemoan’d, in heaven belov’d. 

Obit. 3rd June 1805, aged 42 years. 

Thou wert a friend to all save thyself, the only 
exception. 

Sacred to the Memory of Mary Buchanan, 
wife of the Reverend Claudius Buchanan, 
who died at sea, near the Island of St. Helena, 
on her return to England on the 18th day of June 
1805. Long before she proceeded on her 
voyage to her native country she had bent her 
thoughts, on “ another country,” that is, an 
heavenly, and had attained to that blessed state of 
mind of which our Saviour spoke when he said 
“ Mary hath chosen that good part, which shall j 
not be taken away from her.” 

She died in the 25th year of her age. 


Here lie the remains of Thomas Keene, 
born December 1757, died August the 14th 1803. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Master Nathl. St. Geo. Hume, 

who departed this life on the 12th Sept. 1805, 
aged 1 year and 7 days. 

To the Memory of Charles Bothman, Esq. 
who departed this life on the 23rd September 1805, 
aged 48 years. 


To the Memory of 

Lieut.-Col. James Achilles Kirkpatrick, 

of the Honorable East India Company’s 
Military Establishment of Fort St. George, 
who after filling the distinguished station of 
Resident at the Court of Hyderabad upwards of j 
nine years, and successfully conducting during 
that period various important negociations, 
died at Calcutta 15th Oct. 1805, aged 41 years. 
This Monument is erected by his afflicted 
father and brothers. 


Sacred to the Memory of 
Mrs. Hamilton Barraud, an affectionate wife, 
a tender mother and sincere friend. 

“ Haste my belov’d, and fetch my soul, 

Up to thy blessed abode ; 

Fly, for my spirit longs to see 
My Saviour and my God.” 

Died on Wednesday the 23d October 1805, 
aged 23 years. 


Here lieth the body of 
Mr. William VJfaite, 

Blacksmith, late of Clive street, a man well 
known in this settlement for his private 
and public virtues : as a friend to all and enemy 
to none ; who upon every occasion chose 
rather to give up than to exact a 
right by an appeal to the law. 

He departed this life on the 12th Nov. 1805, 
aged 48 years. 

Why on this mouldering tomb express his praise, 
Whose name can build what time can never raise. 


Sacred to the Memory of 

Mr. Thomas Bcig, 

mate in the H. C. Marine, who departed this life 
Dec. 10th, 180